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Posts Tagged ‘Young People’s Press’

Brantford Boys (Originally Published with Young People’s Press)

In Education, Writing (all kinds) on August 27, 2016 at 3:00 AM

The greatest challenge to Big Brothers of Brantford and District is attracting volunteers, says executive director Pam Blackwood.

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Big Brother Little Brother (Originally Published for Young People’s Press)

In Education, Technology, Writing (all kinds) on August 26, 2016 at 3:00 AM

Charles may not see his Big Brother often, but he talks to him a lot – online that is.

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Amanda and her Big Sister (Originally Published with Young People’s Press)

In Education, Writing (all kinds) on August 25, 2016 at 3:00 AM

A typical preteen girl, Amanda enjoys going to the mall, socializing with her buddies and chatting long distance about life’s trials and tribulations with her Big Sister.

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Brantford Boys (Originally Published with Young People’s Press)

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on July 22, 2014 at 3:00 AM

In Education, Writing (all kinds) on May 26, 2009 at 10:13

The greatest challenge to Big Brothers of Brantford and District is attracting volunteers, says executive director Pam Blackwood.

“It’s hard getting the volunteers to commit,” Blackwood says. “And they’re hesitant to work with the teenagers.”

But the agency may have found a solution in Digital Heroes, a new e-mentoring initiative by Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada (BBBSC). Read the rest of this entry »

Big Brother Little Brother (Originally Published for Young People’s Press)

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on July 21, 2014 at 3:00 AM

In Education, Technology, Writing (all kinds) on May 26, 2009 at 07:03

Charles may not see his Big Brother often, but he talks to him a lot – online that is.

The 13-year-old Barrie youth started to E-mail and chat online with his Big Brother, Darryl Ingham, about sports, humour, video games, family life and his favourite Web sites after the two were matched in a new Big Brother Big Sisters of Canada (BBBSC) program, Digital Heroes.

The program, available through the Big Brothers of Barrie, matches volunteers with Internet access to children, allowing a Big Brother Little Brother relationship to flourish online. Read the rest of this entry »

Amanda and her Big Sister (Originally Published with Young People’s Press)

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on July 20, 2014 at 3:00 AM

In Education, Writing (all kinds) on May 25, 2009 at 17:23

A typical preteen girl, Amanda enjoys going to the mall, socializing with her buddies and chatting long distance about life’s trials and tribulations with her Big Sister.

The Cambridge girl and her Big Sister, Lindsay Serbu, who works in Windsor, have chatted regularly online since being matched in Big Brother Big Sisters of Canada’s (BBBSC) new Digital Heroes program. Read the rest of this entry »

Hamilton Heroes (originally written for Young People’s Press and Big Brothers Big Sisters)

In Education, Technology, travel, Writing (all kinds) on October 22, 2011 at 3:00 AM

Image result for Big Brothers Big Sister

Hamilton Heroes

Don Lawson remembers his Grade 1 teacher.

“When you walked into that teacher’s classroom she made you feel like you were the most special thing she encountered that day.”

Lawson, now the director of marketing at Big Brothers of Burlington and Hamilton-Wentworth, says that’s the effect mentors have children who go to Big Brothers.

“When a child feels liked by an adult, it really helps their self-esteem,” he says, adding that has many positive outcomes, such as children staying in school and keeping out of trouble with the law.

But since Lawson started as executive director of Big Brothers of Barrie and District in 1986, the number of volunteers getting involved with Big Brothers and Big Sisters organizations across Canada has been falling.

Kids in Hamilton and Burlington wait for one to two years to be matched with a volunteer, Lawson says.

The difficulty of quickly matching kids with mentors is why Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada (BBBSC) has “focused on revitalizing the big brother, big sister movement,” Lawson says.

Digital Heroes, an e-mentoring program, being piloted in nine agencies in Ontario, is one way that BBBSC is trying to increase volunteerism.

Lawson attributes much of the decline in volunteers to more rigorous work schedules.

Digital Heroes, however, takes one hour a week of a volunteer’s time, and can be done from home or work.

In traditional matches, the pair gets together weekly for recreational activities. Digital Heroes is modeled after the traditional program, except any interaction takes place over the computer through E-mail or online chats.

Children involved in Digital Heroes receive a free computer and Internet access from AOL Canada.

The e-mentoring program is like having an electronic pen pal, says Lawson, adding that the relationship can be lasting and special.

Most people have preconceived notions of what it means to be a Big Brother or Big Sister relationship, he says.

“When people hear about BBBSC they think of the traditional program,” Lawson says. “People have boxed us into what we can do.”

The Hamilton agency has roughly eight different programs for volunteer mentors to participate in.

Digital Heroes is administered by BBBSC and Frontier College. The program is expected to expand to different parts of Canada in 2003.

Computers for the project were contributed by RBC Financial Group and CIBC and were upgraded by reBoot Canada. The Ontario’s Promise initiative was responsible for launching the project and formed the partnerships.

AOL Canada is the major sponsor of the project. Jon Hamovitch, vice-president of human resources at AOL says Digital Heroes is a true example of what can be accomplished through partnerships.

“This program brings together technology, innovation, and human spirit to benefit children and youth,” Hamovitch says. “I applaud Ontario’s Promise for their ingenuity and determination to make this program a reality.”

In Hamilton and Burlington, one of the highlights of Digital Heroes is taking children off waiting lists and putting them into e-mentoring relationships, Lawson says.

“When it takes a long time for kids to be matched, they get the message ‘I’m not good enough,'” he says. “Hopefully Digital Heroes gives us another way to say ‘You matter.'”

Mentoring Online

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Technology, Writing (all kinds) on July 1, 2011 at 3:00 AM

Digital Heroes Program – Photo Courtesy of Google Images

It was going to end.

Matched through Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada (BBBSC), Andrew, 11, and Parbal Idhu, 23, thought their mentoring relationship was finished.

They had spent two years getting to know each other and becoming friends.

Idhu had spent four years at McMaster University studying biochemistry and had just been accepted to medical school at the University of Toronto. He sold his motorcycle to help pay for school and said goodbye to Andrew.

But now, Idhu and Andrew will keep in touch through the Digital Heroes program, a BBBSC e-mentoring initiative that allows Big Brother and Big Sister relationships to take place online.

Idhu says he is glad he can maintain contact with Andrew so he can continue to give him guidance.

They chat about things like school, Idhu says, and as a Big Brother, he encourages Andrew to do well.

Rebecca Hart, case manager for Big Brothers of Burlington and Hamilton-Wentworth, is also pleased that they can continue their relationship.

“Everyone was sad” when Parbal moved to Toronto, she says.

Andrew gets a computer as part of the program, which will be beneficial to him, Hart says.

Idhu agrees

“He can get on top of things and learn about computers and technology at a young age,” he says.

The Digital Heroes program is a new spin, E-mail, and online chats, on traditional BBBSC one-on-one mentoring relationships.

Digital Heroes is being administered by nine BBBSC agencies in Ontario and Frontier College. The program is expected to expand to different parts of Canada in 2003.

Computers for the project were contributed by RBC Financial Group and CIBC and were upgraded by reBoot Canada. The Ontario’s Promise initiative launched the project and formed the partnerships.

AOL Canada is the major sponsor of the project. Jon Hamovitch, vice-president of human resources at AOL says Digital Heroes is a true example of what can be accomplished through partnerships.

“This program brings together technology, innovation, and human spirit to benefit children and youth,” Hamovitch says. “I applaud Ontario’s Promise for their ingenuity and determination to make this program a reality.”

Karen Hancock, national programs coordinator for BBBSC, says that Digital Heroes will benefit a lot of young people in BBBSC programs, including older youth and rural youth, who often have a hard time being matched with volunteers.

Mentors will also benefit, Hancock says. The program is less constraining for elderly mentors, and for those who don’t have a lot of free time.

Idhu agrees the program is a more convenient alternative to the traditional one-on-one match.

“I think it’s a little easier online,” he says. “A lot more people can get involved this way, and it still gives the Little Brother support.”

Idhu says he values his relationship with Andrew.

“I grew up by myself, without siblings. It makes me appreciate Andrew and hanging out with him.”

Becoming an Educator: Teaching the next generation of journalists and media Professionals (Published on CABJ.ca)

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Writing (all kinds) on March 18, 2011 at 6:00 AM

Image result for Cartoon character of a black female teacher

It took me five years to teach in Toronto. My first teaching experience was at Carleton University in Ottawa as a Television Teaching Assistant. I later went on to teach in Kampala, Uganda at Makerere University (the oldest African university) and while I was a graduate student at Concordia University.

I had grown up in Toronto, however, once I reached the age of 18, due to work and school, I spent time outside of the city. I returned to Toronto for my longest stay in any one city since the age of 18 in 2001. I returned to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), as well as worked with Canoe.ca, Young People’s Press, the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration, freelance talent work, Media Research Institute, Share Newspaper, Pride Newsmagazine and New Dreamhomes and Condominiums Magazine to name a few. I really wanted to make the transition to teaching, and 40-year veteran of journalism Robert Payne helped me to make that transition.

I went to him for career coaching and he let me know in 2005 that there was a job opening in teaching at Centennial College. I applied for the full-time job and although I did not get it, it opened the door for me to teach my first course in Toronto at Centennial in Magazine Journalism that started January 2006.

This experience springboarded into working at Seneca College, University of Guelph-Humber, Humber College, Trebas Institute, George Brown College and Ryerson University. If I did not have my master’s degree from Concordia University in Montréal, I would not be able to do this work.

The landscape for what a lot of post-secondary institutions are asking of journalism educators is changing. Mike Karapita at Humber College calls it “credentializing.” There is a movement for educators to become more educated, and this is a big reason why I am currently doing my Ph.D. in Education at OISE/University of Toronto. I started May 2010.

The next generation of journalism educators has many challenges ahead of them. It is still a competitive market that grows even more competitive because those that are untrained in the field continue to make strides. Journalism education needs more of an emphasis on how young journalists can be entrepreneurs and successfully run their own freelancing business. This is effective from a tax perspective, as well as a job security perspective. Job security is an elusive thing these days; however young journalists can stay on top of this by working for a variety of employers.

If you would like more information on this topic, you can email Donna Kakonge at dkakonge@gmail.ccom.

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