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Posts Tagged ‘Writing’

Comment parler aux gens fous + Plus en vente maintenant

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on January 12, 2018 at 3:00 AM

Trouver le cadeau parfait pour la saison Comment parler aux gens fous et comment écrire Creative Non-fiction à la fois par Donna Kakonge à

http://kakonged.com

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Disponible dans un livre électronique, livre de poche et également relié.

Entrez les codes FELICITAS pour aujourd’hui seulement ou DECBOOKS12 à la caisse sur le site Lulu.com et obtenez 20% de réduction.

New Book Essentials of Writing for Small Business by Teresa Madaleno to be Released in Early October

In Writing (all kinds) on September 11, 2017 at 12:52 PM

It has been a long time coming, but in early October my new book, Essentials of Writing for Small Business will be published. This is a guide for anyone who wants to take on the task of writing their own news releases, proposals, case studies etc., as opposed to hiring a professional writer. Below is an excerpt from the introduction of the book.

‘ Many people may feel that writing is a task that only English majors can perfect but the truth is that you can improve your writing skills with simple adjustments, and we all need to communicate effectively in the business world.

Research shows that people with good writing skills are viewed as more credible and therefore meet with much more success. When you think about it, this makes sense. When we are in school, good writers tend to get high grades. In business, people seem to equate good writing with competence. At work, when you receive a document or email from a colleague that is riddled with grammatical errors and/or typos, do you not think he/she is lazy or less capable? Be honest about how you answer this question. Now, if your career is important to you then consider this: Many of the world’s best CEO’s have advanced creative writing skills. These are skills that they use every day to win people over. Do you want to win people over? If you do, then you need to write in a concise manner and in a thoughtful manner. The structure is also important when writing, whether it is a newsletter, proposal, or any other type of written document.

Essentials of Writing for Small Business is your simple guide to writing everything from short emails, web copy, blogs, or news releases to lengthier copy, such as speeches, white papers, and proposals.’

Soon, I will provide details on the release date and how you can get a copy!

Diaspora Dialogues

In book reviews, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Events, Living, Media Writing, Writing (all kinds) on September 1, 2017 at 3:00 AM
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Friday, July 24, 2009

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In this issue:

Malvern’s triple sensations: Young writers celebrate their fiction, poetry and graphic novel writing

Read the rest of this entry »

2017 Writing Contest Now Open

In Writing (all kinds) on August 24, 2017 at 12:27 PM

MUSICWORKS’ 2017 SONIC GEOGRAPHY WRITING CONTEST IS OPEN

 

Annual juried contest offers top three winners cash prizes and publication

in Canada’s acclaimed magazine about experimental music and sound art.

 

Deadline for entries is October 27, 2017. Winners will be announced in February 2018.

 

For immediate release, TORONTO—Musicworks’ seventh annual Sonic Geography Writing contest is now open to receive entries from anywhere in the world! Musicworks has been exploring experimental music and sound in a triannual magazine since 1978. Its annual juried contests spotlight new literary and musical talent, offering cash prizes and opportunities to be published and heard.

 

Sonic Geography Writing Contest

The elemental music of the Selkirk Mountains. The hiss and harmonics of the London Underground. The soothing, rhythmic swish of a school photocopier. These sounds have inspired some of our past contest winners. Choose any location—urban or rural, indoors or outside, cacophonous or quiet—and describe how sound shapes your experience in prose or poetic writing. Maximum length: 500 words. Accepted file types: PDF only. $25 entry fee includes a one-year subscription to Musicworks magazine; $5 each additional entry (unlimited).

First Prize: $500 cash, piece published in the Spring 2018 issue of Musicworks and online

Second Prize: $200 cash and piece published on musicworks.ca

Third Prize: $100 cash and piece published on musicworks.ca

Entry portal, assessment criteria, prize details, and past winners can be found on our contest landing page!  www.musicworks.ca/contest

Also, check out our Electronic Music Composition Contest

Compose a piece in one of the following experimental genres: Acousmatic, Electroacoustic, Glitch, Intelligent Dance Music, Turntable art, or Video music. Maximum time: 10 minutes. Accepted file types: MP3 or MP4 only

 Musicworks is dedicated to engaging and building new audiences for experimental music. The triannual magazine, which comes with a companion CD, features in-depth articles on Canadian and international composers, improvisers, instrument designers, and artists who work in genres such as radio, electroacoustics, concert music, sound installation, and sound sculpture. With a dynamic website and outreach programs, Musicworks creates an inclusive community within which to exchange and develop ideas and excite curious listeners with adventurous music.

Jessie Rivést
Operations & Circulation Manager

2017 CONTESTS NOW OPEN

416.977.3546 |  musicworks.ca
Musicworks is a non-profit organization supported by financial assistance from the Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, Canadian Heritage, SOCAN Foundation, advertising, paid subscriptions, and donations.

Want the best Canadian writing? Read short fiction

In book reviews, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Events, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Writing (all kinds) on June 30, 2017 at 3:00 AM
Rachel Muenz Writes About the Canadian Giller Prize - Photo Courtesy of Stockexpert.com

Rachel Muenz Writes About the Canadian Giller Prize - Photo Courtesy of Stockexpert.com

By Rachel Muenz

A couple of weeks ago, British Giller judge Victoria Glendinning bashed Canadian writing in the Financial Times of London. She said our stuff is too homogenous and that it’s easy to get grants and be published if you’re Canadian, no matter how bad your writing is.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Love of Writing

In Writing (all kinds) on March 9, 2017 at 5:15 PM

By Saad Zafar

One of my teachers once told me that I should read more in order to be able to write better. Another one of my teachers told me that I should write more in order to be able to write better. I’m neither a voracious reader nor a prolific writer. I do enjoy writing. More so than reading.

There is a profound satisfaction that comes from seeing your written words on a page. And knowing that those words originated from your consciousness and flowed through the ink from your pen onto paper. And those words are a representation of a part of your consciousness.

As enjoyable as reading can be, it really can’t compare to writing. While it is true that writing can be considered more “work” than reading (since writing is more active whereas reading is more of a passive act), there are moments when — if you’ve been writing long enough — that you enter a zone whereby the words flow out of your pen so easily and with such minimal effort that it’s the closest that writing can ever come to be a passive action.

It is in those moments that the intensity of the writer’s satisfaction is at its zenith. They’re rare. But they’re enough of an incentive to make the writer continue to try and seek them out through writing.

Creating Things: Profile of Roger McTair (Originally Published on Impowerage.com)

In book reviews, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Health, Living, Media Writing, Writing (all kinds) on February 13, 2017 at 12:00 PM
Roger McTair Creates Magic - Photo Courtesy of Seneca College's Website

Roger McTair Creates Magic – Photo Courtesy of Seneca College’s Website

Roger McTair is a director, poet, professor and writer who lives in Toronto, Canada. He has had short stories air on CBC Radio and BBC Radio.

He was born in Trinidad and Tobago on October 7, 1943. Not having much to do while growing up galvanized his love of creating things.

Read the rest of this entry »

End Piece: an uplifting experience (Originally Published in Concordia University Alumni Magazine)

In Education, Media Writing, Writing (all kinds) on April 29, 2016 at 3:00 AM

Since I was seven years old I knew I wanted to write. My master’s degree in media studies from Concordia helped me reach that goal — and much more. Read the rest of this entry »

Digital Journals and Numerology Just Published

In book reviews, Business, Creative Writing, Writing (all kinds) on February 25, 2016 at 3:00 AM
Use numerology to express yourself to yourself

Use numerology to express yourself to yourself

This book is meant to emphasize how powerful keeping a journal can be with the aid of numerology. I started writing one at the age of seven and keeping a journal has been a constant for me – more than some friends, some jobs and some family members. I used to get a thrill selecting my journals to write in. Now I have decided to try something new by using the computer that I already spend so much time on and money on to show how powerful keeping any journal…even a digital journal can be. Using the principles of numerology can also help in chronicling your life. It can be bought at http://stores.lulu.com/kakonged.

New Book – Journalism Stories Collection

In book reviews, Business, Writing (all kinds) on February 19, 2016 at 3:00 AM
You can buy journalism stories through my e-store

You can buy journalism stories through my e-store

I have come out with a new book of journalism stories I have written over about a span of five years, most since I have been back from Montreal to Toronto. You can buy Journalism Stories Collection at this website: http://stores.lulu.com/kakonged. I have eight other books I have written there titled, What Happened to the Afro? How to Write Creative Non-fiction, Spiderwoman, My Roxanne, Being Healthy: Selected Works from the Internet, Do Not Know, My Story of Transportation and eSpirituality Chats. You can buy them all.

Commonwealth Short Story Prize 2015 open for entries‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on October 15, 2014 at 3:00 AM

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16 September 2014
Announcement

Romesh Gunesekera, Chair of the 2015 judging panel, with last year’s winner, Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi
2015 Commonwealth Short Story Prize Open for Entry

Writers have two months to enter their short story.

Each year, we select five winning writers from five different Commonwealth regions who share a total prize money of £15,000. The overall winner receives £5,000, one of the highest amounts for an international short story prize open to unpublished writers. Regional winners receive £2,500. Read the rest of this entry »

Get Donna Kakonge’s Books on Discount at Lulu.com – http://lulu.com/spotlight/kakonged

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on September 20, 2014 at 8:53 AM

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“Join the Writers’ Circle” at Indigo Bookstore’s Bay & Bloor Location on Monday, February 17, 2014 from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on February 17, 2014 at 9:46 AM

Please join authors Cynthia Reyes, Teresa Madaleno, Donna Kakonge and poet Sheila Stewart for a discussion around writing at Indigo Bookstore.

Address: 55 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M4W 1A5

Date: Monday, February 17, 2014

Time: 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

All are welcome!

Note: For more information about the authors, please Google the following names:

Teresa Madaleno

Cynthia Reyes

Sheila Stewart

and,

Donna Kakonge

If you’d like to let us know you’ll be there, please RSVP here for free tickets:

https://www.uniiverse.com/jointhewriterscircle

“Join the Writers’ Circle” at Indigo Bookstore’s Bay & Bloor Location on Monday, February 17, 2014 from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on February 16, 2014 at 5:30 PM

Please join authors Cynthia Reyes, Teresa Madaleno, Donna Kakonge and poet Sheila Stewart for a discussion around writing at Indigo Bookstore.

Address: 55 Bloor Street West, Toronto

Date: Monday, February 17, 2014

Time: 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

All are welcome!

Note: For more information about the authors, please Google the following names:

Teresa Madaleno

Cynthia Reyes

Sheila Stewart

and

Donna Kakonge

If you’d like to let us know you’ll be there, please RSVP here for free tickets:

https://www.uniiverse.com/jointhewriterscircle

Synapse: Writing Insight From Gotham

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on May 14, 2013 at 10:18 AM
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When film critic Roger Ebert died April 4, he was lauded for many things – his versatility, longevity, savvy, wit. But one virtue in particular stood out. As Chicago photographer Art Shay put it, “Even with movies he panned, he invariably found something worth going to see in them.”

Take his review of a film that regularly made his “worst films” lists: Adam Sandler’s The Waterboy. Ebert called Sandler’s character “insufferable,” described the plot as an “exhausted wheeze of a sports movie formula,” and gave the film one star.

Nevertheless, he praised the performance of actress Kathy Bates, writing that she “makes her character work as a comic creation, and knows the line between parody and wretched excess.” And he resisted the urge to hurl insults at Sandler. Instead, he wrote, “I suggest he (Sandler) is making a tactical error when he creates a character whose manner and voice has the effect of fingernails on a blackboard, and then expects us to hang in there for a whole movie.”

What Ebert demonstrated in that review and countless others is what the critic Judith Crist called mutual regard, and she included it as one of her four essential elements of any good work of criticism. (The other three are passion, frankness, and specificity.)

Mutual regard, she said, is showing respect for the creator of any work you’re evaluating, as well as respect for your readers.

When Crist talked of mutual regard, you never suspected the notoriously acerbic critic was trying to tell other would-be reviewers, “You kids play nice.” Rather, she cautioned writers to balance their obligation to be honest, even blunt, about a work’s quality with their obligation to acknowledge the effort, and struggle, invested in it by fellow artists.

In her famous review panning the 1963 Elizabeth Taylor-Richard Burton film Cleopatra, Crist identified a litany of its failures: The script: “a mélange of clichés and pompous banalities.” The sets: “Cardboard and paint.” Liz Taylor: “Fishwife.”

But even though the movie was a four-hour epic that she called an “extravagant exercise in tedium,” she still found much to praise: the “lilting speech of Richard Burton;” the “fine performances” in minor roles by Roddy McDowell and Rex Harrison; the costumes that were “nothing short of sensational.”

And she conceded some moviegoers would enjoy the film. “Certainly,” she wrote, “if you want to devote the best part of four hours to looking at Elizabeth Taylor in all her draped and undraped physical splendor, surrounded by elaborate and exotic costumes and sets, all in the loveliest of colors, this is your movie.”

Though we don’t always identify it as such, mutual regard is something Gotham teachers train our students to use. When Gotham students are workshopping something, they must open their comments by identifying one thing that works in the piece they are reviewing. We don’t require this solely to put writers at ease in our classrooms, nor because writers often struggle to identify what works in their own writing, though both of those are true. We require it because mutual regard is essential to editing one’s own work, to reading the work of others, and to becoming a successful writer.

Mutual regard shows that you recognize the inherent merit in creating a work of art. It gives readers a sense of where your standards lie, as it allows them to compare your evaluations of what works against your evaluations of what does not. And it lends you authority, by demonstrating that you have put thought into your evaluations, and weighed things fairly.

We live in an age of ever-more criticism – a cursory search for reviews of Baz Luhrmann’s adaptation of The Great Gatsby, for example, yielded 40,900 results, and that doesn’t count the opinions we’ll hear on Facebook or Twitter or out to dinner with friends. Writers who manage to rise above the noise, as Crist and Ebert did, understand that mutual regard is key, because ultimately it cultivates between writer and reader something crucial – trust.

Cheers,

Kelly Caldwell
Associate Dean of Faculty
Gotham Writers’ Workshop


UPCOMING CLASSES

Late Spring/Summer classes are available either in NYC or online.
You can also take a tour of our online classes.

WRITE-INS

The Write-In is now in Brooklyn! Starting June 1, we’ll be hosting Saturday afternoon Write-Ins at Two Moon Cafe in Park Slope. Now you can have your weekend coffee with a side of writing inspiration. Sign up in advance or drop in.

We’ll still be hosting our Friday night Write-Ins in Manhattan.

SUMMER WRITERS’ WEKEEND
Friday, June 21 through Sunday, June 23

Why stay in the city (or travel here) when you could be at the beach?

Three good reasons:
1. Manhattanhenge
2. Shakespeare in the Park at the Public Theatre.
3. Washington Square Outdoor Art Exhibit.

And now, the Summer Writers’ Weekend!
Register for one class for $125
Two classes for $225
Three classes for $300
(Plus a $25 registration fee covering all classes.)

That sounds as refreshing as an ocean breeze.

Register here.


The Care and Treatment of Sacred Things, Part I
by Kelly Caldwell

It’s usually the first question on the first day of my New York City Memoir workshops: “Can you talk… about drawing from your life experience to write, and discovering that which is sacred and off-limits material?”

Only this time, it came not from a novice student, but through my iPod headphones from a veteran writer and host of the radio show, Writers on Writing (KUCI-FM, Irvine, California). And as Marrie Stone put the question to Molly Gloss, her novelist guest, she fused “sacred” and “off-limits” into a single term, winding the ideas together like the twin strands of DNA.

I expect this concern in my level 1 workshops, from writers eager to tell their stories but unwilling to sacrifice something precious in the process. Hearing it posed by a professional like Stone, though, I knew: Not only fledgling writers believe that when something is sacred to you, writing about it could be sacrilege. (Continue reading.)


This past week we started asking our Facebook fans some writerly questions. Maybe you read them—maybe you even answered some.

THE QUESTION: What’s your favorite guilty pleasure movie?
Our favorite answer was from Sara Johnston: “Independence Day. Will Smith, Jeff Goldblum, Bill Pullman: what’s not to love?” (Yes! And don’t forget Harry Connick, Jr.—kick the tires and light the fires.)

We also loved Rosalie Capri’s response: “Sixteen Candles…auto-mo-bile.”
(We’re sure the actor who played Long Duk Dong would be proud.)

THE QUESTION: Name an author, dead or alive, who you’d like to sit next to on an airplane.
With more than 100 responds, this was a tough one to decide.
Here are our top three:

Jennifer Allen wrote, “William Golding in the window seat and Aldous Huxley in the aisle. I’d gladly suffer the middle seat for that flight.”

“Jane Austen—I really hate her work so I’d be interested for her to try to explain what I’m missing,” wrote Tom Peach.
(Let’s face it: Austen’s Mr. Darcy simply doesn’t exist off the page.)

Janel Blessing added, “Truman Capote. We’d get airplane drunk.”
(That would be an entertaining flight for sure.)

THE QUESTION: What is one book you’ve never been able to finish?
Anna Setti wrote, “Anna Karenina. She got on my nerves.”
(At least Anna’s no Scarlett O’Hara or Amanda Wingfield.)

Want to join the conversation? Like us on Facebook.


Annie Proulx writes literary fiction brilliant enough to win major accolades and accessible enough to win a wide audience. She specializes in short stories, including “Brokeback Mountain.” She didn’t begin writing until her 50s, and as you’ll see, she doesn’t believe in rushing things.

Here’s a peek at what the author of The Shipping News advises:

  1. Proceed slowly and take care.
  2. To ensure that you proceed slowly, write by hand.

Continue reading. 


Are you ready to get Lit?

Gotham is hosting an event at Lit Crawl NYC on Saturday, May 18 in Brooklyn. We’ll be stationed at Ceol, an awesome Irish pub in Cobble Hill (191 Smith Street, between Baltic & Warren Streets) from 6:15-7:00pm.

For those of you who have enjoyed our Write-Ins these past few months, we’ll be doing something similar – only built for a much larger audience.

So come out, drink up, and write.


 


Every two weeks, Gotham’s Brandi Reissenweber answers questions submitted by readers of The Writer magazine. Here are some of the questions that she’s recently answered:

Q: I usually find ideas from real life that would make great short stories. How can I make it fiction instead of just retelling the real event? Answer

Q: Do I really need to bother with a cover letter when submitting my short stories? Answer

Find more Ask The Writer Q&A here

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Self-Publish Your Way Around The World This May – Let Your Words Reach The World!!!

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on April 9, 2013 at 3:51 PM

Spots Going Fast…Sign Up Soon Through The School of Continuing Studies at the University of Toronto!!!

Self-Publishing Around The World: http://2learn.utoronto.ca/uoft/search/publicCourseSearchDetails.do?method=load&cms=true&courseId=25437365

Write About Anything!

Lulu.com – Free Ground Shipping – How To Talk To Crazy People by Donna Kakonge

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on March 19, 2013 at 9:44 AM
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2012 in review

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on December 30, 2012 at 3:57 PM

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

19,000 people fit into the new Barclays Center to see Jay-Z perform. This blog was viewed about 69,000 times in 2012. If it were a concert at the Barclays Center, it would take about 4 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Boxing Day

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on December 26, 2012 at 3:00 AM

http://www.donnakakonge.com/work/dwork.html

Last Day To Get How To Talk To Crazy People Before the 24th – ENTER CODE FELICITAS

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on December 13, 2012 at 10:30 PM

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Get 30% Off How To Talk To Crazy People + How To Write Creative Non-fiction + MORE

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on November 28, 2012 at 3:03 PM

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Taste of Water Book Launch at Supermarket in Kensington – December 2, 2012 at 4:00 p.m.

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on November 27, 2012 at 3:00 AM

Book Launch Invite – Nandita’s dad

How To Talk To Crazy People Book Launch – Great Event!!!

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on November 26, 2012 at 3:00 AM

The book launch at Accents on Eglinton Bookstore at 1790 Eglinton Ave. West at Dufferin in Toronto, Canada was a fantastic event and all of the 21 people in attendance agreed. Everyone received a free .pdf copy of the book in attendance as a holiday gift of thanks. The former publisher of the book was not there. The book is now published by me…Donna Kakonge.

To purchase a paperback copy of the book, please visit: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/kakonged?searchTerms=How+To+Talk+To+Crazy+People

To purchase the book on Amazon Kindle, please visit: http://www.amazon.com/s?_encoding=UTF8&field-author=Donna%20Kakonge&search-alias=digital-text

Book will come out soon on Amazon, iBookstore and on Barnes & Noble.

Thank you to all of those who came out tonight and showed your support by being honest.

Book Review: Mikaya Heart’s My Sweet Wild Dance

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Religion, travel, Writing (all kinds) on June 30, 2012 at 3:00 AM

Rachel Muenz Does a Review of Mikaya Heart\’s My Sweet Dance – Photo Courtesy of Dreamstime.com

Image result for Mikaya Heart My Sweet Wild Dance

By Rachel Muenz

Mikaya Heart’s My Sweet Wild Dance is not an artistic masterpiece, nor is it meant to be. It is, however, a clear, well-written and honest coming of age story that most readers should find interesting at the very least.

Based on Heart’s own life, the book follows the main character Christine as she grows from a confused, frustrated child in Scotland, to a young angry teen and finally, to a spiritually calm middle-aged woman living in California. Through this journey, Christine overcomes gender and class stereotypes, the demands of her parents, childhood sexual abuse and her own negativity by discovering her sexual identity as a lesbian and through travel and spiritualism.

The story begins with something of a warning that though it is a “true story,” it is only Heart’s version of the truth. She says the book is not meant to have a moral but to show Christine’s path through the difficulties of life and to inspire and entertain others. Overall, My Sweet Wild Dance succeeds in that goal.

After the preface, a prologue and the first chapter introduce us to Christine as a self-confident adult before leading into a mostly chronological account of her life from about age five to her 50s. The first half of the book is set in the U.K. and the second half covers Christine’s life in the U.S.

Told in short chapters broken into smaller sections, the book is easy to get through and should appeal to those who like their reading material in small doses. However, the fragmented structure can sometimes be a bit disorienting. There are times, especially in the latter half of the book, where some sections in a chapter don’t quite relate to each other or flow as nicely as they could. The structure isn’t a disaster but some readers may find it too choppy for their liking.

Also, some scenes don’t seem necessary to advance the plot while others leave us wishing Heart had stayed with them longer and fleshed them out a bit more. A good example of one of these beautiful scenes is the stream Christine plays in as a child. Here, Christine learns “what will feel solid when [she] touch[es] it and what (such as the weeds or the illusory water itself) will disappear between [her] fingers like air.” This scene mirrors the contrast of how polite the adult world is supposed to be with how harmful it is to Christine in reality, a major theme in this part of the book.

Yet, often, we don’t get as strong a sense of the people and places in the book as we would like because these scenes begin and end suddenly. Characters and places flash into Christine’s life like sparks and disappear just as quickly. But, as the preface states, the book is about Christine working through and exploring her feelings rather than bringing settings and characters to life. It is Christine’s bravery and gutsiness in facing great difficulty that keeps us reading in spite of her flaws.

Throughout the book, Christine refuses to give in.

She battles through the effects of her father’s bullying to finally stop submitting to men and avoids conforming to her mother’s idea of an upper-class Scottish lady by becoming a hippy, political activist and, later, an agricultural mechanic and kiteboarder. Lastly, she overcomes the grief and anger of her experience with sexually abusive men through a heightened spiritual awareness and through her world travels, the beauty of nature and the love she finds with women.

Heart, like Christine, also shows courage in her use of language in the book.

For the most part, the language is plain and uncensored though it tends to be almost raving during Christine’s spiritual and sexual experiences, matching the emotional intensity of these events. Heart leaves nothing back in describing Christine’s sexual relationships and the sexual abuse she suffers as a child. As a result, the first half of the book and the flashbacks in the second are tough to get through because of the number of upsetting abuse scenes. However, the book is also filled with plenty of humour to lighten things up and Christine’s eventual triumph over this abuse makes up for the pain.

Finally, though readers may also find parts of the book repetitive – Christine’s constant cycle of falling in love with new women and then losing interest is one example – the spiritual growth and power Christine attains is just too interesting to pay much heed to the book’s few problems. As Christine says near the end of the book, “From the perspective of All-that-is, things aren’t so serious. Often they are simply experiences.” Ultimately, My Sweet Wild Dance is a record of both simple and extraordinary spiritual experiences that should leave all but the most cynical of readers uplifted.

My Books Available @ Accents on Eglinton – 1790 Eglinton Avenue West @ Dufferin Street in Toronto, Ontario, Canada

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on March 1, 2012 at 3:43 PM

Image result for Accents on Eglinton Bookstore at Artscape Wychwood Barns in Toronto

Facebook link: http://www.facebook.com/events/452277591496604/

 Accents Bookstore on Eglington at 1790 Eglinton Ave. West is having a Pop-Up Shop on Saturday, December 15th from 1-6pm. The pop up shop will feature art, books, fashion, beauty products and more highlighting the work of diasporic African, Latin, and Caribbean people. We are contacting you to find out if you’re interesting in vending and selling your products at this pop-up shop.

I will be there selling my books, as well as How To Talk To Crazy People.

It is also available at: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/kakonged?searchTerms=How+To+Talk+To+Crazy+People and soon on Amazon.

Also find out more about the event here:

Looking for that special gift for the holidays? Or just want to check out what your local artisans and entrepreneurs are doing?

 

Accents Bookstore on Eglinton Av W (@Dufferin) is having a Pop Up Shop on Saturday, December 15th from 1-6pm. The Pop Up Shop will feature art, books, fashion, beauty products and more highlighting the work of diasporic African, Latin, and Caribbean people.

PLEASE remember to invite your friends, fans, clients, and customers to the event. Post on your facebook page, social media, blog, twitter etc. The Facebook link is provided below. 

http://www.facebook.com/events/452277591496604/
Featuring: 
Cha’coal
Be Classy Boutique

Asikere Afana

Art Card (Prints of original paintings by A.Itwaru & Natasha Ksonzek)
Black Empowerment

Disfiyu (Professional Skin Care)
Donna Kakonge (writer)
Guillermina Castillo
Love Jewelry and Accessories
Luze.Arte
Max International
Reflection Designs

Global Wealth Trade
Thelma Nozzaci (writer)
Tray Arts
Wild Moon Jewelry

Bernard & Andrea Richards (art)

Gregory Frank (drummer)

Cuban Coffee &(Cubita+Serrano+Turquino)+ Music

Children Books
+ more

Special !!!!! Accents’ Gift Cards available!
Saturday, December 15, 2012
1-6pm

Accents Bookstore
1790 Eglinton Ave W
(@ Dufferin)

Phone: 647-352-8558.

CANMARC Real Estate Investment Trust suspends operation of distribution reinvestment plan

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Technology, Writing (all kinds) on January 29, 2012 at 3:00 AM

Image result for CANMARC Real Estate Investment Trust

MONTREAL, Jan. 26, 2012 /CNW Telbec/ – CANMARC Real Estate Investment Trust (“CANMARC”) (TSX: CMQ.UN) announced today that in light of the entering into of the previously announced support agreement among CANMARC and Cominar Real Estate Investment Trust, CANMARC will suspend, effective immediately, the operation of its distribution reinvestment plan (the “DRIP”). As a result, the previously declared distribution of $0.07917 per unit of CANMARC for the month of January 2012 which will be paid on February 15, 2012, to unitholders of record as at January 31, 2012, will not be eligible for reinvestment pursuant to the DRIP.

About CANMARC Real Estate Investment Trust

CANMARC (www.canmarc.ca) is an unincorporated open-ended real estate investment trust established pursuant to a declaration of trust under the laws of the Province of Quebec. Managed internally, CANMARC owns a portfolio of Canadian income-producing commercial properties, consisting of retail and office properties with certain industrial properties. In total, CANMARC properties comprise approximately 9.4 million square feet of commercial gross leasable area and 464 multi-family residential units located in Quebec, Atlantic Canada, Western Canada and Ontario.

Life Rattle – Three Quarters

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Technology, travel, Writing (all kinds) on January 3, 2012 at 3:00 AM

Here is the link for the show on Life Rattle Radio:

http://www.liferattle.ca/radio/show1185.html

World of Words (Originally Written in 2009)

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Technology, travel, Writing (all kinds) on December 23, 2011 at 3:19 PM

Image result for Concordia University

Since I was seven years old I knew I wanted to write – and I knew a master’s degree in Media Studies from Concordia would help.

While I did my master’s degree I had the opportunity to organize my thoughts and improve my writing by doing many essays. My “fait de complet” was a 90-page research paper relating to racial politics. I read the equivalent of five pages of bibliographic material for that paper. My reading comprehension skills improved. Reading philosophers like Heidegger in my media studies classes four times was good training. Taking Iain Cooke’s new technology course gave me marketable skills.

The opportunity to be part of small class discussions and do presentations was all good preparation for getting a job.

My degree at Concordia was a springboard for interesting things.

I’ve been a freelance writer and independent contractor for 11 years professionally – some of that work done during the two years I spent doing my degree.

I keep my calls in the evenings short so I wake at 6 a.m. The night before I start my freelance writing, I get my Yahoo email and MSN Messenger ready. I open a Word document and date it, keeping the document in my Media Research Institute electronic folder.

I work from home in the early mornings and it helps to pay my rent. I’m finished work by the time most people start. This leaves my day free for other writing projects.

The writing I do is for the automotive industry and I am learning a lot. I’m still getting used to having the morning coffee ready.

Writing is hard work and not everyone is making J.K. Rowling’s big bucks.

In my spare time, I’ve written four books and plan to publish them.

The first book I ever wrote was completely done by hand in a notebook. I knew about computers, but there was something intimate about putting pen to paper. I’m hoping to self-publish it with a place out in Vancouver. The first time I self-published was when I had 15 copies of my research paper/thesis printed and sold three of them for $50 in Montreal. I made back my investment and broke even.

I have always wanted to write. All my career decisions have led me to achieve this goal. Recently, I’ve worked with the Ontario provincial government. I worked with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) for more than a decade, with many opportunities to write. I was a journalist fulfilling many different roles. Speaking of roles, I’ve even done acting and landed a commercial with The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care in Ontario. As I read my lines, I dreamt of writing the script.

That’s probably why writers write. There’s so much I do not know – but what I do know is that writers have a brief moment of destiny building with the words they put down or speak. It’s not much different from a carpenter who builds a house or parents who create a child. It’s a powerful thing.

As the cost of living gets higher in a city like Toronto, it becomes harder to really only write. Other sources of income are needed – and if I were to write my complete CV from the time I started delivering newspapers at the age of 10 – it would be 10 times longer than this.

What keeps me writing is the fact it’s a challenge, a friend, and a personal outlet. It’s a challenge – I’m always trying to earn a living. It’s a friend – writing has been my constant companion since I wrote my first story on dinosaurs. It’s an outlet – it keeps my hands busy.

A big part of my identity is tied to being a writer. I have Concordia as one of the many places and people to thank for that.

Help with Academic Writing Style

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Health, Living, Media Writing, Technology, Writing (all kinds) on December 19, 2011 at 12:40 PM

Image result for OWL Purdue

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/

The Meaning of That Word, Love

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Technology, Writing (all kinds) on November 25, 2011 at 3:00 AM

Mikaya Heart is a Minister of Holistic Healing and an author, writing books and articles on subjects as varied as lesbianism, orgasm, politics, and shamanism. My Sweet Wild Dance, which is the story of her personal journey from anger to joy, won a Golden Crown Literary Award. Her latest book is The Ultimate Guide to Orgasm for Women. She is a coach in the art of being fully alive, using shamanic methods to help her clients live in trust and access Universal energy, facilitating positive change in all areas of life. (www.mikayaheart.org)

Image result for Mikaya Heart

By Mikaya Heart

Many of us, women especially, believe that sex is primarily about another person, and that really good sex is about an experience of oneness, which might also be called love, with that other person. We tend to believe that the experience of one-ness is inextricably tied up with our partner. That can get us into a lot of trouble, since assigning the power of creating such a sensation to another person is always false. Any and every perception of reality is to do with the person who is doing the perceiving. You may be able to tune into a completely different experience of reality than the person you are standing or lying next to, and the fact that you feel a great deal of love (or one-ness) is a tribute to you. Love always flows from inside.

Love has little or nothing to do with finding a partner, whether we are married or otherwise. Many of us are terrified of living out our lives alone; we equate feeling loved with having a partner, who, of course, loves us. Yet, what are we talking about when we use this word? Don’t we more often mean compatibility and companionship? Those things are what make a relationship work on a daily basis; love does not. In fact, sometimes we really love someone and need to stay well away from that person because she or he is abusive. No amount of loving will change an abusive person until he or she is ready to change.

Love, when experienced as one-ness, is quite different from compatibility and companionship, and it has nothing to do with any other single person except insofar as someone else’s presence may facilitate our feeling it. But the presence of another person is never required in order to feel love; another person (whether a guru, a lover, a relative, a teacher, a therapist, or a complete stranger) may simply help to open doors, or rather, point to doors that are already open. The ability to recognize an open door and then have the courage to walk through it is your own qualities. Such gifts may feel that they are out of your control because the depth and breadth of awareness necessary in order to feel love is far beyond the capacity of the ordinary brain. When you are in love, you are in touch with some far deeper wisdom than anything the brain can match. And so, it feels greater than the you that is used to feeling small. We, humans, know ourselves to be very tiny and very vulnerable. Without the greater, or vaster, self – sometimes referred to as the soul – we are indeed tiny and vulnerable. We develop an unhealthy ego in order to bolster ourselves out of that place, but when we are in touch with the vaster self that we really are, the ego falls away. It has no place anymore. And then we understand what tremendous strength there is invulnerability.

The greater self, that which we truly are, makes everything possible, and when we are really in touch with it – that is, when we allow that greater energy to flow through us – then we are vast, and we really know love. That energy, that life-force, which we call love, exists outside of time and space and is therefore vast beyond our wildest imaginings. It is impossible for our brains to grasp the reality of existence outside of time and space since they dictate everything about our daily lives.

This is a world of duality: peace and war, summer and winter, good and bad, night and day. Seeing through the limits of the physical eyes and intellectual understanding, we always perceive a thing in relation to its opposite. Through that perception, love cannot occur unless there is also hatred, and good cannot occur unless it is also bad. Within what I am referring to as ‘one-ness,’ these opposites don’t occur. Within one-ness or unity, it is possible to have an experience of love that has nothing to do with hatred. The following words come close to describing it: joy, delight, beauty, peace, bliss, ecstasy. There are a number of ways to get to that place, and an orgasm is one of them. Our tendency to fixate on the person we are with when we have that orgasm is not useful. If we can have that sensation with one person, we can have it with another, and we can have it when we are alone, and we can have it without touching our genitals – although the fact remains that many of us most easily experience it through an orgasm that is sexually induced. Caught up in our daily lives, we find those blissful moments very hard to recapture. Very few of us dwell in that place for more than a few moments or think about it much at all. It would be very beneficial to practice allowing the feeling to last longer.

Clearly, sex can be a very powerful healing force: restorative, clearing, expansive, profound. Because we live within duality, sex can be used to do the opposite of healing: to alienate, destroy, pervert, and hurt people. It is a very powerful force. Many women, especially those who have grown up in cultures where fear of rape is a daily reality, are very aware of this other side of sex. Although society may tell them it’s something they are supposed to enjoy, they are understandably uncertain whether they want to get too involved with it. For some women, sex is a way of getting pregnant, and something they do because they are with someone who wants it. If they don’t enjoy it, they are very unlikely to talk about it because they think there is something wrong with them, and because there is so little support for anyone who has conflicting feelings around sex. A supportive partner can make a huge difference, as the feeling of being loved can enable a woman to be honest about what is going on. It is this feeling of being loved, and not judged, that so many of us are looking for. Genuine love is always unjudgmental and undemanding, and truthfully it is around us all the time. We need to learn how to be in a place where we can embrace that instead of being suspicious and anxious, which creates an atmosphere where the presence of love cannot be felt. We can extend that unconditional love to people we don’t know, and we can receive it from them. We don’t have to be intimate partners. We only have to be willing to offer what we want to receive.

Intimacy with another human being is a very wonderful thing, and if it includes having wonderful sex, then that is doubly wonderful. I find, for myself, that it is very easy to love someone I am intimate with – but that doesn’t mean I feel attached to that person, or have expectations of her, or make commitments to her. As we all know, it is very hard to get involved over time without having expectations. A relationship that lasts is one where there those expectations unfold easily: in other words, where there is companionship and compatibility. How long a relationship lasts, however, is never a measure of its quality. I would measure its quality by how real and honest we can both be, how deeply we can share. In one of my books, I wrote the following: “I want those three little words, I love you, to mean, ‘I see the wholeness of all that you are at this moment, and I accept you without judgment, honoring your unique infinite beauty. In this moment, my heart is joined with yours and I know that we are not separate beings. I support you absolutely in being fully who you are, even if that means that you will go away and I will never see you again.’ “

Expressive Writing Exercise – 5

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Writing (all kinds) on July 27, 2011 at 3:00 AM

 

Image result for DinosaursDinosaurs

I’m onto a new journal. This one has lined paper. I have been a writer since the age of seven. There was a Chinese teacher of mine in grade two who wrote “outstanding” in red pen on my class assignment about dinosaurs. She wanted to get it published. My Dad came to the school to speak to her about it. I waited the rest of the school year, thinking it would get published. Summer came and I still had my story from Mrs. Chen.

I’m now thirty-eight, thirty-nine on August 12, 2011. I have self-published forty-three books. I have a short story in Concordia University’s Headlight Anthology – the first one. That makes forty-four. I signed a contract with Rowman and Littlefield’s group of publishers in the States in August of 2010. They are going to publish three of my books. How to Write Creative Non-fiction, Journalism Stories Collection and The Best of Donna Magazine. I need to get back to the corrections from the spec editor soon. Finding time has been hard. I get ten percent of the profit only if so many are sold. My other books were mainly published with Lulu.com. I have books on Amazon Kindle and Amazon too. I have not ever published the dinosaur story. I do not even know where it is.
I was the one who approached the Rowman and Littlefield Group of Publishers first. It was a suggestion from a psychic who charged me fifteen United States dollars a minute. His name is Nicky Power on the Keen Psychic Chat. It’s been months since I have phoned a psychic. I have been doing Hans Decoz’s free numerology reports since 2007. Numerology does not change like astrology since the planets move.

Diaspora Dialogues – Friday Nights

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Music, Opinion, Technology, travel, Writing (all kinds) on April 28, 2011 at 3:00 AM

Writers Converge at TPL – Photo Courtesy of Google Images

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

April 29: Friday Nights with Diaspora Dialogues

Our Friday Nights series brings you an eclectic sampling of some of our best writers and performers – for free!

Don’t miss this final night of our popular and jam-packed series with the Toronto Public Library’s Keep Toronto Reading festival. Featuring readings by Antanas Sileika (Underground), Jacob McArthur Mooney (Folk), Adebe DeRango Adem (Ex Nihilio) and emerging writer Joyce Wayne; spoken word by Angelica LeMinh; and a short reading from Rebecca Applebaum’s play Complex. Hosted by Dalton Higgins.

WHAT: Friday Nights with Diaspora Dialogues (part of Toronto Public Library’s Keep Toronto Reading)
WHEN: Friday, April 29, 2011, at 7:00 PM
WHERE: Toronto Reference Library, Atrium – 789 Yonge Street (Yonge & Bloor)
COST: Free
CONTACT: Aisling Riordan – aisling@diasporadialogues.com or 416-944-1101 x 363

Biographies

Rebecca Applebaum is a playwright, actor, and musician and was born and bred in Toronto. She earned her M.A. in English from U of T and was a member of fu-GEN Theatre’s seventh Kitchen Playwriting Unit. As an actor, Applebaum works in theatre, film, and television. Recent stage work includes paper SERIES (Cahoots Theatre Company), Harriet’s House (Gailey Road Productions), Project ACT (Mixed Company Theatre), and The Physical Ramifications of Attempted Global Domination (Birdtown and Swanville/ Harbourfront HATCH). She also co-wrote and co-starred in the Next Stage Theatre Festival hit, Don’t Look, and was a member of the 2011 Acting Ensemble for the Women in the Director’s Chair program at the Banff Centre. Applebaum has also worked as a facilitator in theatre for social change with Mixed Company Theatre and Lorraine Kimsa Theatre for Young People and was a member of the indie pop band Europe in Colour.

Adebe DeRango-Adem is a writer whose words travel between Toronto and New York. Her work has been published in various North American sources, such as The Claremont Review, Canadian Literature, CV2, and Descant. Her debut poetry collection, Ex Nihilo (Frontenac House, 2010) was one of ten manuscripts chosen in honour of Frontenac House’s Dektet 2010 competition, using a blind selection process by a jury of leading Canadian writers: Bill Bissett, George Elliott Clarke, and Alice Major. Ex Nihilo was longlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize, the world’s largest prize for writers under 30. She is also the co-editor, alongside Andrea Thompson, of Other Tongues: Mixed-Race Women Speak Out.

Dalton Higgins’ fourth book Fatherhood 4.0: iDad Applications Across Cultures dissects fatherhood through the lens of hip-hop, popular culture, and multiculturalism. A print journalist who’s penned National Magazine Award-winning features, Higgins spends some of his nights and weekends trolling the web for inspiration (when he’s not fielding a zillion public school level questions from his two seedlings, Solomon and Shiloh) and recently was one of 30 Torontonians blogging for the Toronto Star about ways to make the city more liveable.

Angelica LeMinh is an analog girl in a digital world. She’s been an old lady since she was eight, when the folks at the post office used to cower at the sight of her coming to complain about rising stamp prices. It’s because of a book that she learned compassion for the first time, and to date, she still does everything in her power to read and write. She is ecstatic to contribute “The Hip Hop Reading Rainbow”, a book column for Pound Magazine. Her empire bites back at http://www.metrotextual.wordpress.com

Jacob McArthur Mooney is a Nova Scotian now living in Mississauga, Ontario. He is an editor with the always controversial web journal ThievesJargon.com and the founder of The Facebook Review. A graduate of Memorial University of Newfoundland, he is currently an MFA student at the University of Guelph. His work has been widely published, and in 2006 he was shortlisted for the CBC Literary Award in Poetry. The New Layman’s Almanac is his first book.

Antanas Sileika is the author of two novels and one collection of linked short stories, Buying On Time, which was nominated for both the City of Toronto Book Award and the Stephen Leacock Award for Humour. His last novel, Woman in Bronze, was a Globe and Mail Best Book selection. He lives in Toronto, where he is the director for the Humber School for Writers.

Joyce Wayne has just completed her first novel, a historical thriller entitled The Cook’s Temptation. Now she is writing stories, such as the one in TOK 6, about Jewish immigrants in the 1940s and how their sympathies were divided between the old country and Canada. Shortly, she intends to begin a novel about Russian spies operating in Canada at the dawn of the Cold War. Joyce teaches journalism at Sheridan College where she is the head of the Media for Global Professionals program. She sits on the Board of Directors of the college and is a member of the board of the Oakville Arts Council. In the past, Joyce worked as a staff writer at Quill & Quire and as an editor at various Canadian publishing companies.

Diaspora Dialogues is supported by Maytree, Canadian Heritage, Ontario Arts Council, Canada Council for the Arts, the City of Toronto through the Toronto Arts Council, the George Cedric Metcalf Charitable Foundation, Ontario Trillium Foundation, RBC Foundation, and TD Bank Group.

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Diaspora Dialogues
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Toronto, Ontario
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Something to Write About!

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Technology, Writing (all kinds) on August 8, 2010 at 5:00 AM

Jennifer Winters Writes About Writing – Photo Courtesy of Jennifer Winters

Jennifer Winters - August 23, 2010

Written by: Jennifer Winters

Writing can truly be the essence of a new beginning for people.

A reality of seeing the words you write is usually the truth of how you feel. A picture may be worth a thousand words, but for all of those words that you write that is the source of your feelings. It is never too late to journal when it is hard for people to express themselves out loud. Journaling can truly save lives, yes it is an extremely private thing, and usually, the thoughts are for no one to ever read but you. For those that do not have the ability to express their words verbally it must be extremely frustrating, and for those who are able to talk, we take for granted how valuable a pen and paper really is. I remember on every winter vacation that I took with my parents years ago I was to buy a new journal book with every intention of writing in it. I would get to about the 5th day and had stopped. That went on for 10 years, and then I started with writing entries on the computer, and then started with the blogs. Once again I had stopped, and I was trying to figure out why am I stopping the one thing I love. If you have ever felt like an outsider looking in, or never felt apart of it difficult to feel like one could engage in conversation. Anais Nin once wrote, “The role of a writer is not to say what we all can say, but what we are unable to say.” If we didn’t have writing as a tool there would be no music, no great speeches from presidents (some we could do without), yet all done by writing it out first. It is very easy to get lost in writing, and some are way beyond the average Joe. However, that is needless to say we all can’t pick up a pen and paper every day and write what is on our mind even if doesn’t make sense.

Reading Like a Writer by Francine Prose: Book Review

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Health, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Writing (all kinds) on May 1, 2010 at 3:00 AM

Chris Temelkos Writes about Reading Like a Writer – Photo Courtesy of Author Francine Prose

Chris Temelkos - May 1, 2010 - Photo Courtesy of Francine Prose

By Chris Temelkos

Reading Like a Writer by Francine Prose delves into the importance of reading each piece of literature, not only for pleasure but to gain a deeper knowledge of the language and word usage of the author and learn something new about each character and scene with every read.

Prose teaches us how exploring different literature and reading each piece word by word and sentence by sentence can help improve the way we write and open our minds to a more complex approach of reading and writing rules. This book is great for amateur and professional writers alike, Prose’s writing is concise and clear and her arguments are right to the point. However, the book may not be enjoyed by everyone. I found at times I would lose my concentration mid-read due to a lack of excitement, no plot twists or cliffhangers here.

If your looking to improve your writing and reading skills, as well as obtain a deeper appreciation for literature and what it has to offer, then this book is for you. If you’re looking for something to excite and engage you, then you may want to look elsewhere. If this book taught me anything, it was to have patience while reading and writing.

A Wish After Midnight

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, travel, Writing (all kinds) on March 28, 2010 at 9:48 PM

Zetta Elliott is the Author of A Wish Before Midnight – Photo Courtesy of the HappyNappyBookseller.com

 

Zetta Elliott - March 28, 2010

A WISH AFTER MIDNIGHT
By Zetta Elliott

“When we contrast the condition of blacks in the 19th century with that of blacks living in the 21st century, we’re inclined to think the difference is like night and day. But speculative fiction reframes the past, creating a kind of literary lens that enables us to look more closely at the shifting definition of freedom. Have we really crossed the finish line? I think a lot of us still have a long way to go…”

Adapted from the interview with Zetta Elliott on Omnivoracious.com

Inspired by the work of Octavia Butler, the African American science fiction writer, as well as her favorite childhood book, The Secret Garden, debut novelist Zetta Elliott takes readers back to Civil War-era Brooklyn – and the draft riots – in her new book, A WISH AFTER MIDNIGHT (February 16, 2010; $12.95). Provoking the question “What if?”, Elliott’s characters yearn for what is possible in a tumultuous world.

A WISH AFTER MIDNIGHT gives readers a hopeful young heroine, Genna Colon, stuck in the confines of a tough neighborhood in 2001’s inner-city Brooklyn. Frustrated by the drug dealers in her building, her family’s cramped apartment, and her inability to compete with the cute girls at school, Genna finds comfort in her dreams of a better future. Almost every day she escapes to the peaceful haven of the Brooklyn Botanical Garden and tosses coins into the fountain, wishing for a different life, a different home, and a different body. But when Genna flees into the garden late one night after an explosive family fight, her wish goes awry and she finds herself instantly transported back in time to the turbulent months leading up to the notorious New York draft riots. Facing the deadly realities of racism and class structure in Civil War-era Brooklyn, Genna must fight to survive, hold on to her individuality and rise above the hand she has been dealt in two different worlds.

With broad appeal for both teens and adults, A WISH AFTER MIDNIGHT is a thought-provoking journey, offering the chance to re-live history and re-examine our present with a fresh perspective.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Zetta Elliott earned her Ph.D. in American Studies from New York University and has lived in Brooklyn for the past 15 years, where she has become a student of its unique history. She is also a poet and playwright, and her picture book, Bird, was the recipient of a 2009 ALA Notable Children’s Book award. Learn more about her at www.zettaelliott.com or watch the book’s trailer at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SU54KOI05Fs.

ABOUT AMAZONENCORE:

AmazonEncore is an exciting new publisher that serves an important purpose in the world of contemporary literature, bringing attention to exceptional books that have been overlooked by readers or traditional publishers.

###

A WISH AFTER MIDNIGHT

By Zetta Elliott

AmazonEncore; Publication Date: February 16, 2010

Paperback; $12.95; 272 Pages

Zetta Elliott, PhD

writer ~ educator

www.zettaelliott.com

www.zettaelliott.wordpress.com

“Zetta Elliott’s time travel novel A Wish After Midnight is a bit of a revelation…It’s vivid, violent and impressive history.” ~ Colleen Mondor, Bookslut. Learn more about A WISH AFTER MIDNIGHT here.

Zetta Elliott’s first picture book, BIRD, has “unusual depth and raw conviction… [the] child-centered narrative excels.” ~ starred review, Kirkus Reviews. Find out more about BIRD at http://www.leeandlow.com/books/176/hc/bird

Discover other titles by Zetta Elliott at www.zettaelliott.wordpress.com/rosetta-press/

Diapora Dialogues

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Technology, Writing (all kinds) on February 26, 2010 at 8:17 AM

Diapora Dialogues Features Young Writers – Photo Courtesy of Dreamstime.com

Diaspora Dialogue - February 26, 2010

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

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Young Writers from the Edge
Join us this March as high school students in Etobicoke, Danforth-Crescent Town, Jamestown and Malvern present their brand new creative writing at reading events in their neighbourhoods.

In Young Writers from the Edge, Diaspora Dialogues’ youth writing program, students work with professional mentors to develop their writing skills in three different forms, including fiction, drama, poetry, graphic novel, and journalism.

Based on the work developed through these workshops, the youth will present their pieces alongside their mentors at a celebratory reading event. Don’t miss the chance to hear our city’s freshest emerging writers!

For more information, contact Julia at 416-944-1101 x 277 or julia@diasporadialogues.com.

Young Writers from the Etobicoke Edge
Presented in partnership with Lakeshore Arts and Toronto Cultural Services
When: Thursday, March 4th, 2010 – 6 pm
Students from: Father John Redmond CSS and Lakeshore CI
Mentors: Julie Tepperman, Emily Pohl-Weary, Kerri Sakamoto, Isaac Thomas, Melissa Dean
Where: The Assembly Hall – 1 Colonel Samuel Smith Park Drive (SE corner of Kipling Ave and Lake Shore Blvd W)

Young Writers from the Danforth-Crescent Town Edge
Presented in partnership with S Walter Stewart Branch
When: Friday, March 5th, 2010 – 6 pm
Students from: East York CI and Danforth CI
Mentors: Emily Pohl Weary, Catherine Graham, Diana Tso, Lauren Kirshner and Nicholas Keung
Where: S Walter Stewart Branch Library – 170 Memorial Park Avenue (Danforth and Coxwell)

Young Writers from the Jamestown Edge
Presented in partnership with Albion District Branch
When: Saturday, March 6th, 2010 – 6 pm
Students from: North Albion CI, Kipling CI, Thistletown CI, and Monsignor Percy Johnson CHS
Mentors: Andrea Thompson, Andrew Mitrovica, Philip Adams and Greg Beettam
Where: Albion District Branch Library – 1515 Albion Road (Albion and Kipling)

Young Writers from the Malvern Edge
Presented in partnership with Malvern Branch
When: Tuesday, March 9th, 2010 – 6 pm
Students from: Lester B Pearson CI and Blessed Mother Teresa CSS
Mentors: Julie Tepperman, Ibi Kaslik and Tory Woollcott
Where: Malvern Branch Library – 30 Sewells Road (Neilson and Sheppard Ave E)

Diaspora Dialogues is supported by Maytree, Canadian Heritage, Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, the City of Toronto through the Toronto Arts Council, the George Cedric Metcalf Foundation, TO Live With Culture, and the Vital Toronto Fund through the Toronto Community Foundation.

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http://www.diasporadialogues.com
Diaspora Dialogues
170 Bloor Street West, Suite 804
Toronto, Ontario
Canada
M5S 1T9

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Classes at Aangen Centre Canceled

In Beauty, book reviews, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Living, Media Writing, Technology, Writing (all kinds) on February 4, 2010 at 6:13 AM

Writing and Self-Publishing Workshops Still Being Offered Personally by Donna Kakonge – Photo Courtesy of Dreamstime.com

Self-Publishing Workshops

I was planning writing and self-publishing workshops through Aangen Community Centre in Toronto. Those classes have now been canceled. If you would be interested in still receiving instruction from me concerning writing and self-publishing, please email me at dkakonge@sympatico.ca.

From Worldwide Freelance Writer

In book reviews, Business, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Living, Media Writing, Writing (all kinds) on November 25, 2009 at 7:58 PM
Five Ways - Freelance Writing - November 25, 2009
FEATURE ARTICLE
 
Five Ways To Shine As A Professional Writer
 
By Dana Blozis
 
With the growth of social media and marketing techniques like
online article marketing, it seems that everyone is a writer of one
sort or another. In fact, I've read a handful of articles that
assure the reading public that anyone can write. While this may be
technically true, those of us who write for a living know that it
isn't as easy as it sounds. There is much more to the craft than
meets the eye.
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Writing Workshops and Self-Publishing Offered at Aangen Community Centre

In Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Living, Media Writing, Writing (all kinds) on November 19, 2009 at 7:07 PM

Aangen Centre Workshops - November 19, 2009

Hello everyone in Toronto!

Please check out this site and scroll to the bottom for workshops I will be offering to start on February 21st and happening once a month. Here is the link: http://www.aangen.com/workshops.asp. Join in the fun!

Sesame Street Anniversary with Google

In Beauty, Business, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Environment, Events, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Writing (all kinds) on November 9, 2009 at 8:41 AM

Sesame Street - November 9, 2009

Sesame Street - November 9, 2009

I have been thoroughly enjoying the Google themes for the Sesame Street anniversary. Sesame Street was a big part of my childhood with my brother and sister. It is wonderful that it continues on to this day.

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Excerpt from Digital Journals and Numerology

In book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Health, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Technology, Writing (all kinds) on October 18, 2009 at 3:26 AM
Digital Journals and Numerology is One of Donna Kakonge's 31 books - Photo Courtesy of Dreamstime.com

Digital Journals and Numerology is One of Donna Kakonge’s 31 books – Photo Courtesy of Dreamstime.com

 

IntroductionDigital Journals and Numerology

This book is meant to emphasize how powerful keeping a journal can be with the aid of numerology. I started writing one at the age of seven and keeping a journal has been a constant for me – more than some friends, some jobs, and some family members. I used to get a thrill selecting my journals to write in. Now I have decided to try something new by using the computer that I already spend so much time on and money on to show how powerful keeping any journal…even a digital journal can be. Using the principles of numerology can also help in chronicling your life.

To buy this book, please visit http://stores.lulu.com/kakonged.

Canada’s university magazines beat the U.K.’s in word economy

In Culture, Education, Entertainment, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Writing (all kinds) on September 24, 2009 at 6:25 AM
Rachel Muenz Compares the Word Count of Stories Between Countries - Photo Courtesy of Stockexpert.com

Rachel Muenz Compares the Word Count of Stories Between Countries – Photo Courtesy of Stockexpert.com

Rachel Muenz - Writing - September 12, 2009

By Rachel Muenz

Apparently, Canada doesn’t think its university students can handle long articles. Either that or it just uses language more efficiently than its U.K. counterparts.

Based on a random selection of five articles each from five Canadian online publications for students and five from publications in the U.K., Canadian articles are over 120 words shorter than those in the U.K.

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Simple writing is best for everyone

In Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Writing (all kinds) on September 12, 2009 at 3:46 AM
Rachel Muenz Writes About Simple Writing - Photo Courtesy of Stockexpert.com

Rachel Muenz Writes About Simple Writing – Photo Courtesy of Stockexpert.com

Rachel Muenz - Writing - September 12, 2009

By Rachel Muenz

Every English teacher I’ve ever had has always said using plain, clear language is best in any kind of writing. Authors don’t make readers think by language that’s impossible to understand, but by the complex themes and ideas, they write about.

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