The Politics of Hair (Proposal to Ryerson University)


Everybody Does Something to Change Their Appearance for Advancement - Photo Courtesy of Stockexpert.com
Everybody Does Something to Change Their Appearance for Advancement - Photo Courtesy of Stockexpert.com

The politics of black hair shows in books like Tenderheaded to the Princess of Wales plays ‘Da Kink in My Hair and Hairspray to movies like Beauty Shop to songs played on Flow 93.5.

Continue reading “The Politics of Hair (Proposal to Ryerson University)”

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Buy The Politics of Black Hair: An Online Course – Check Out the Pages Section of this Magazine to Find out where you can buy it!



Ancestry.ca

 

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Hair – by Donna Kakonge (published December 1999/January 2000 – Panache Magazine)


In Beauty, Media Writing, Opinion, Technology, Writing (all kinds) on November 2, 2008 at 14:27

Back in the mid-80s, watching Oprah Winfrey’s bouncing and behaving hair was like a dream come true. I never knew that black hair could do that. I rushed to a salon, telling them to duplicate the Oprah ‘do on my head, and they did. The bad part is that just like what once happened to Oprah, my hair fell out. I was left with no hair on my head to duplicate any ‘do. Continue reading “Hair – by Donna Kakonge (published December 1999/January 2000 – Panache Magazine)”

The Politics of Black Hair


The Politics of Black Hair

By Donna Kakonge

OISE/University of Toronto

 

ABSTRACT

 

What is so threatening about natural Black hair? This is something we are still aiming to understand although one of the researchers began the study at Concordia University in Montréal in 1997. The suggestion for studying Black hair came from two naturally Blonde women. We continue to do study in our PhD at OISE/University of Toronto. Back in the mid-1980s, watching Oprah’s bouncing and behaving hair was like a dream come true. We never knew that Black hair could do that. We rushed to a salon, telling them to duplicate the Oprah ‘do on our heads and they did. The bad part is that just like what once happened to Oprah, our hair fell out. We were left with no hair on our heads for a time to duplicate any ‘do. Now we have hair, different from First Lady Michelle Obama, but hair nonetheless. What is so threatening about natural Black hair? Even Michelle Obama must blow dry straight her natural hair to keep her hair so healthy, just like Oprah does.

 

Introduction

 

Nina Simone sings “Black is the Color of My True Love’s Hair,” however that song is first a traditional folk song potentially coming from Scotland (“Black Is the Colour (Of My True Love’s Hair),” 2013) and actually many of us have once thought our true soul mate was a bald man, even if it was Mr. Clean. But the inside love (that’s all of us) do have Black hair. Learning to love ourselves and our hair, however we choose to protect it, colour it, straighten it, weave it, love it, braid it, lock or dread it and ultimately embracing it, is a never-ending project. We have decided to make it our unofficial focus of study at the graduate and PhD level.

One of the researchers sits with some friends at a Montréal university pub in 1997 talking about what she often does – hair. One of them says to Donna, “why don’t you do research on hair?” Donna thinks she is crazy and that she will not ever find information on the topic. She does. Five pages worthy of a reference list for a master’s thesis done in two years.

As many Black women, and some Black men too, we have gone through quite a hair journey. We started off with our natural hair from birth and sitting between our mothers’ or fathers’ knees to get it combed and braided. We dreaded having our hair combed. This could be the reason why many of us do wear dreads and call them as such with Pride. We know more hair came out on the comb than what was actually on my head with the fine-toothed ones. Those combs are not made for curls boys and girls.

We would wear towels to simulate having White girls’ hair. Now, all we use a towel for is to dry the hair on our heads. We have heard that Whoopi Goldberg used to do this too. Many Black women have. When the Jheri curl became popular in the early 1980s, we begged our mothers or fathers or guardians to let us get “the Michael Jackson look.” Our parent/s, guardian/s allowed us to do so and because we hated going to the hair salon, our hair actually grew because we were barely combing it.

We wore the Jheri curl up until high school until we were introduced to relaxers through media. When we saw Janet Jackson in “The Pleasure Principle” video (“The Pleasure Principle (song),” 2013) with her swinging relaxed hair – we thought our pleasure principle relied on a relaxer.

We have all seen some of the friends we have or had, be successful with relaxers. When you have super curly hair from Mother Africa, this can be hard to achieve. Why should it be achieved? For whom? For what? Why? What is so threatening about natural Black hair? Some Black people’s hair is less super curly and can be straightened easily. This tends to be the case for many African-Americans which could explain why United States First Lady Michelle Obama’s hair does look good. So does super curly African hair.

Books by Lonnice Brittenum Bonner that we find while browsing through A Different Booklist or Accents on Eglinton in Toronto or Knowledge Bookstore in Brampton, Ontario inspire us to start using olive oil, jojoba, aloe vera gel and natural oils on our hair. We oil our hair, eat nutritious foods, exercise and ensure that the beauty of our hair is the crown to the beauty of our outer and the envelope to the beauty of our inner. However, the hair can be permanently locked as you may see with some Rastafarians or people who wear their hair in locks, or dreads, with Pride.

This brings us to today where many African people wear a variety of hairstyles, even the straightened ones, weaved ones, coloured ones, dreaded ones, wigged ones, braided ones, twisted ones and bald ones. Anything and everything goes because we are African people. Strong and proud and our hair does not define us – it is point of artistic expression as it is for all of humankind.

 

Donna Kakonge is an author, teacher and writer, law student and PhD Candidate living in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Her official website is: www.donnakakonge.com.


 

References

 

Black Is the Colour (Of My True Love’s Hair). (2013). Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. Online: Wikimedia Foundation Inc. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Is_the_Colour_%28Of_My_True_Love%27s_Hair%29

The Pleasure Principle (song). (2013). Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopaedia. Online: Wikimedia Foundation Inc. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pleasure_Principle_%28song%29

Hairy Chats at Accents on Eglinton – Revised Date – July 21, 2012 at 5:00 p.m.


The Politics of Black Hair Online Course Book

The Politics of Black Hair: An Online Course


The Politics of Black Hair Online Course Book

http://commonground.cgpublisher.com/product/pub.30/prod.3076

Enjoy!

2010 Toronto Natural Hair & Beauty Show


2010 Toronto Natural Hair & Beauty Show
Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre
Sunday Sept. 19, 2010
11AM – 8PM
Brought to you by Toronto Naturals, Naturally Me! & Celebrity Unisex Salon

$15 – General Admission
$10 – Students (Valid ID) & Seniors
Free – Children 12 & Under

Advanced $15 tixs available:
Marsha Patterson – 416.580.5309
Celebrity Unisex Salon – 416.850.4085
Nanni’s Natural Hair Salon & Spa – 416.243.5151

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This year’s show will feature
interactive educational workshops, vendor market place, and live entertainment.

Show Hosted By:
INTELEKT

Live Performances By:

CHATTA
DJANGO
CARIBBEAN DANCE THEATRE
HUMBLE
JAHVID

Hair Showcases By:
NATURAL MYSTIC HAIR SALON
I AM NOT A BARBER
SECRET HAIR SALON
CELEBRITY UNISEX HAIR SALON

Fashion Showcases By:
UNITEES
BEAD 4 HEALTH

Workshops:
THE HEALTHY DIVA – DETOXING YOUR LIFE WITH THE HEALTHY DIVA
WRAP-A-LOC – SISTAH NANDI
TRANSITIONING FROM CHEMICALLY TREATED HAIR TO LOCS OR NATURAL HAIR –
MARIA THOMPSON
HAIRLOCKING 101 – MALAIKA-TAMU COOPER
THE ART OF HEAD WRAPPING – NAZA HASEBENEBI
PROPHET NOBLE DREW ALI AND THE MOORISH DIVINE – CULTURAL EDUCATORS
HISTORY OF BLACK HAIR – ANYA GRANT (IHEARTMYHAIR.COM)
THE HISTORY OF SHEA BUTTER – ANU
DEALING WITH VARIOUS TYPES OF ALOPECIA – DR. NADINE WONG
WHAT IS SISTERLOCKS? – AVALON WILLIAMS
THE POLITICS OF BLACK HAIR – DONNA KAKONGE
2 BARBER WORKSHOPS – DESIGN CUTS – CRAIG “MR. TAPER” LOGAN
MORE TO ADD!

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For SPONSORSHIP information contact:

Stephanie Joseph-Walker
647.206.1543

Marsha Patterson
416.580.5309

sponsorship.TNHBS@gmail.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For VOLUNTEER information please contact:

Avalon Williams
Stephanie Joseph-Walker
volunteers.TNHBS@gmail.com

For GENERAL information please contact:

torontonaturals@gmail.com

http://www.torontonaturals.ca


Stephanie Joseph
Founder/Producer
Toronto Natural Hair & Beauty Show
647.206.1543

Join my social network @ http://torontonaturals.ning.com/

http://www.torontonaturals.ca