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Posts Tagged ‘Pride Newsmagazine’

”Honouring our past, celebrating our present, reaffirming our future” (Originally Published in Pride Newsmagazine)

In Culture, Events, Writing (all kinds) on August 30, 2016 at 3:00 AM

The Canadian Hispanic Day Parade (CHDP) is run by a non-profit organization created to share with all Canadians and new immigrants, Latin language, food, culture, and sense of celebration. Their main objective is to promote the cultural heritage of the Latin American people residing in Canada. On Sunday August 21st, 2005, the CHDP, held their 5th Annual Canadian Hispanic Day Parade beginning at the Jane and Sheppard Mall and ending at the John Booth Arena located at Jane and Shoreham.

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The Future of Guyanese and Canada Business Links (Originally Published in Pride Newsmagazine)

In Culture, Events, Writing (all kinds) on July 21, 2016 at 3:00 AM

Business People Gather at the Guyanese Luncheon

Business People Gather at the Guyanese Luncheon

The links between Guyana and Canada for business were strengthened on Friday, June 24th at a luncheon held at the Elite Banquet Hall.

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Putting Visible Minorities into the Mainstream Workforce (Originally Published in Pride Newsmagazine)

In Culture, Media Writing, Writing (all kinds) on May 6, 2016 at 3:00 AM

The proof of their success is in the runner-up of The Apprentice. Kwame Jackson is a graduate of the Inroads program. He did internships every summer while he was in school to learn his expert corporate skills.

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Urban Women at Toronto Street Festival Review (Originally Published in Pride Newsmagazine)

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on July 2, 2014 at 3:00 AM

In Culture, Events, Music, Writing (all kinds) on March 25, 2009 at 02:29

Juno-nominated Jully Black kicked off the presence of the African-Canadian women performing at the Toronto Street Festival on July 8th to 10th. Black rocked the big crowd at Yonge & Dundas with jazzy R&B sounds.

To add that club feel, Black even had her own DJ who is featured on City-TV’s “Ed the Sock.” But, it was Black’s voice, singing live, not like Ashley Simpson, which kept it real. Read the rest of this entry »

Hushing People to Try on Clothes (originally published in Pride Newsmagazine)

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on June 8, 2014 at 3:00 AM

In Beauty, Business, Writing (all kinds) on December 24, 2008 at 02:49

Owner of Hush Boutique, Stephen Phillips stands by his creations

He was one of those people who answer his phone, but you get put on hold a lot because he has so many calls coming in. After three tries, I was finally able to set-up an interview with African-Canadian Stephen Phillips.

Who’s he? You may ask that now, but just watch this young man and you may not be asking that much longer. Read the rest of this entry »

Creating a Canvas (originally published for Pride Newsmagazine)

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on June 3, 2014 at 3:00 AM

In Beauty, Business, Entertainment, Writing (all kinds) on December 11, 2008 at 03:22

Guess what? That beautiful mane on the head of Miss Universe, Natalie Glebova – it is a weave.

Christos Cox and his team at Urban Textures Salons created the winning look for Miss Universe like any artist creates their canvas.

“I didn’t even know at that time sitting in the salon that she had won Miss Canada,” says Cox. Read the rest of this entry »

Restaurant makeover (originally published for Pride Newsmagazine)

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on May 27, 2014 at 3:00 AM

In Entertainment, Health, Restaurant Reviews, Writing (all kinds) on December 16, 2007 at 20:14

The show “Restaurant Makeover” helps restaurant owners to makeover their businesses. All you need to do is to send in a letter or a call and they decide whether they’re going to take the project on. The show, which airs on the Food Network Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday, matches the money that owners put into the renovations dollar-for-dollar.

Alison Ruthland is owner of First Class Delites at 1156 Weston Rd. She wrote a letter to “Restaurant Makeover” highlighting her situation. Read the rest of this entry »

A sprint to a clothing line (originally published for Pride Newsmagazine)

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on May 26, 2014 at 3:00 AM

In Beauty, Business, Entertainment, Writing (all kinds) on December 16, 2007 at 20:15

he has reached the finish line

A Sprint to a Clothing Line

Published in Pride Magazine – June 29, 2005

Ben Johnson, the fastest man in the world according to a 1988 World Record time of 9.79 seconds, is now in the clothing business.

“I just like good clothing, good fabric, good taste and I think that this type of business is the right thing for me to get involved in,” Johnson says. “I’ve done this many years ago. I’ve done this for 30 years and this isn’t the first time I’ve had my own clothing line. In 1987 I had my own clothing line in Italy and it didn’t really take off because of the public. So I decided to come back 18 years later and do my own stuff.” Read the rest of this entry »

Restaurant makeover (originally published for Pride Newsmagazine)

In Entertainment, Health, Restaurant Reviews, Writing (all kinds) on June 27, 2012 at 3:00 AM
Before "Restaurant Makeover"

Before

After "Restaurant Makeover"

After


Related image

The show “Restaurant Makeover” helps restaurant owners to makeover their businesses. All you need to do is to send in a letter or a call and they decide whether they’re going to take the project on. The show, which airs on the Food Network Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday, matches the money that owners put into the renovations dollar-for-dollar.

Alison Ruthland is the owner of First Class Delites at 1156 Weston Rd. She wrote a letter to “Restaurant Makeover” highlighting her situation.

“We were away from the business for a little while because I had twins in November,” Ruthland says. “One of the twins was born and she immediately went into heart failure. We spent a few months at Sick Kids and my husband was back and forth. So that took up a lot of our time. She was our priority at that moment.”

Ruthland says that because the business got neglected, she took a look at “Restaurant Makeover” and found that it was a great show to fulfill her needs.

“I figured why don’t I give them a call and see what they can do. We wrote in and they responded right away. It’s been a very fast process.”

The show that “Restaurant Makeover” is featuring First Class Delites heavily focuses on Ruthland’s daughter. The Ruthlands have decided to open up another restaurant in name of their daughter called Sydney’s Island Restaurant.

Shaam Makan is the producer of Tricon Films who does “Restaurant Makeover” for the Food Network.

“She [Ruthland] emailed me the story. I went down to visit and as soon as I met the family I knew this is a story I’m going to do,” Makan said.

Ruthland worked with the designer, saying that they wanted a “totally fresh, new look.”

“Apparently, one of the top designers in the city worked on the restaurant,” Ruthland says. “I’m not sure what she’s going to do. Apparently, it’s tables, chairs, ceilings, floors; it’s going to be the whole place. Because when we came to the whole place was demolished. The ceiling was going, the floor was ripped up, the counter, everything. It was a bit of a shock to see the place look like that, but we’re really excited because we know the place is going to look completely different.”

They’re shooting right now for season two and First Class Delites will be featured in November. Makan advises you check out “Restaurant Makeover” at www.foodtv.ca to find out when First Class Delites will be on. The show has had one season.

You’ll have to go down to First Class Delites to see the new and improved restaurant. Also, check out Sydney’s Island Restaurant at 5120 Dixie Rd. in Mississauga that opened recently.

In terms of the recent response to the renovations made at First Class Delites:

“So far we’re getting a great response,” Ruthland says. “We’re getting a lot of new faces. We haven’t changed the menu, but we’ve added some new things on the busier days. Our fish cakes are popular every day.”

The Ruthlands have four children, the twins are seven months old and Sydney is doing much better when doctors had thought she wouldn’t make it home.

Kay McConney (originally published for Pride Newsmagazine)

In Business, Culture, Education, Events, Living, Writing (all kinds) on June 25, 2012 at 3:00 AM

Kay McConneyKay McConney

Image result for Kay McConney - Barbados Consulate

Kay McConney: leaving for other opportunities

Published in Pride Newsmagazine – June 29, 2005

By Donna Kay Kakonge

Kay McConney, the Consul General of Barbados, is leaving her post for other opportunities at the end of July. She has been the longest-running Consul General the consulate has ever had, beginning her diplomatic assignment on May 3rd, 1998.

“I think for me when I came to this job, even though I had not been in the diplomatic core before and was posted to Toronto, it felt natural for me,” McConney says. “I went into a place where in terms of managing relationships which is a huge part of what I do – but, it’s relationships with the private sector, relationships with institutions and partners, relationships with the government agency, relationships with the community people. It was all a business relationship management – and for all of my life I’ve been in one way or another involved in that. So it was very easy for me to make a transition into that.”

McConney started out her career by earning a track-and-field scholarship to the States and studied international relations. She then went on to do her MBA in Belgium in international business.

“I think also the area of international business relations did something that made me very much able to deal with the business community,” McConney said. “When I was in Barbados prior to here, I was involved with private, public sector partnerships. Working with those sectors was something that I was once again very much at home with and I was in collaboration with others.”

McConney says in terms of the challenges of Canada, it was a new environment when she first came, but she saw that if you have the skills, as long as you’re adaptable, you can transfer that in any different situation. “It was a natural fit for me in terms of the experiences I’ve had. It was just another place in time.”

She says there are stories from all different sides to share her experiences as Consul General. There are stories in terms of the coordination of the office. And then there are stories about the external relationships they have with their various publics.

“I would say one external situation that we’ve had to deal with was when Barbados felt we were being challenged by the OECD, the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development – we were able to be demonstrated that people did not need to be concerned about taxation in Barbados. This concerned the international community, as well as Canadian investors. And that was a very exciting time in terms of continuing the kinds of examples of the challenges we have faced.”

McConney also notes the challenges on the internal side of the consulate. “We have got one of the four different departments integrated into one which we called the Barbados Country Team. And those departments are responsible for labour, investment and trade, tourism and foreign affairs – it’s important to integrate all of those.”

She takes special note of the fact achievements she has had as a Consul General were not made alone, but with a team effort.

“We have had some tremendous victories in that regard – not because of me – but because of the team. The truth is that solution has always been working with the team. I have been so privileged to have the kind of team that I’ve had.”

As part of the consulate team, Cheryl Carter is head of the tourism team, Kenneth Campbell is head of our investment team, and Marva Scott is retired from foreign affairs, but worked with McConney for years.

McConney’s last day of her term as Consul General will be on July 31st, 2005.

“I will be going to take a little bit of time off from the diplomatic service before going into other opportunities. Temporarily, I will relinquish the diplomatic service. People will continue to see my passion for Barbados and the Caribbean for whatever I go on to do right now and that’s whether it’s in Canada, or further afield.”

McConney notes she really and truly sees the world as her oyster. “I’m really an international citizen, very proud to be a daughter of Barbados, but a woman of the Caribbean and a citizen of the world. I have lived in the U.S. before, I have lived in Belgium before, I have lived in the Caribbean before, and I have lived in Canada before. In fact, for the last 15 years I have been in this country. So to say that the world is my oyster, I truly believe in that. I am certainly going to follow opportunity wherever that takes me.”

She made her announcement of her departure from the diplomatic core at the 2nd annual Barbados Charity Ball on June 25th, 2005.The theme of the Charity Ball was “Safeguarding the Future.” The money raised went towards youth education and HIV/AIDS. McConney notes the ball was taking care of “body and mind.”

“One of the key things [about the ball] is that we had 15 organizations working together like a united front. And we had a coalition working together like they have never united to work together before. It’s a meeting place for bringing together people. A meeting place for our investors, suppliers, and partners, our consular relations, our community, our government friends from Canada, as well as the Barbados government. It is a meeting place for all those who have interest in Barbados and Canada, and what we can do then is galvanize financial support.”

“I think one of the other things that we are happy about the ball, is that we’re on the path to putting the infrastructure in place for the community to move forward,” says McConney.

Without McConney’s involvement, she says: “I really trust my community to be able to take it forward.”

“We have increased corporate support by 400 percent – that is a phenomenal achievement and it is something that we are here to celebrate tonight… The RBC [Royal Bank of Canada] financial group was critical in our financial support… A special thank you to Canadian business,” Kay McConney said, at the ball. She is hoping that the corporate support increases for the future.

McConney notes the things she is proud of during her time as Consul General.

“We are expanding in the hospitality sector, new opportunities in our labour section, and our relationship with our community is something I feel proud about,” she says. “We launched the first Caribbean Canadian Literary Expo that was in 2003. That is something that I feel especially proud about. Roger McTair was one of the key consultants. It was a fabulous event and hopefully, that is something that will find new life. What it did is to raise the profile of the Caribbean literary artists in Canada. When you can get the Dutch, French, English and Spanish-speaking Caribbean literary artists together – that is bringing together a family of literary people that have a certain feeling.

“When I look back now on my years of Consul General I hope I was the kind that brought people together.”

Urban Women at Toronto Street Festival Review (Originally Published in Pride Newsmagazine)

In Culture, Events, Music, Writing (all kinds) on June 23, 2012 at 3:00 AM

Image result for Sonia Collymore - Canadian Singer

Juno-nominated Jully Black kicked off the presence of the African-Canadian women performing at the Toronto Street Festival on July 8th to 10th. Black rocked the big crowd at Yonge & Dundas with jazzy R&B sounds.

To add that club feel, Black even had her own DJ who is featured on City-TV’s “Ed the Sock.” But, it was Black’s voice, singing live, not like Ashley Simpson, which kept it real.

Her second live song from her new album, “This is me now” merged a twang of reggae with DJ scratching. She segued right into a slower beat that was more like grooving music, singing “To hell with you.” Her fourth song was for her mother.

The song is called “I traveled” and it was a ballad that got the audience snapping. She also got the audience screaming out “love” after she said “peace.” The crowd seemed happy, and on Saturday the 9th a diverse group of Torontonians came out to see Juno Award winner Sonia Collymore at Yonge & Dundas.

Collymore did a fantastic job – putting on a show that I’m sure most people would have paid for. It’s amazing it was free. At one point, she pulled a young man out of the audience on stage with her. Her song “No cash flow” got everyone dancing, including her four Baby Boy dancers. The dancers showed the audience some dancehall moves – getting everyone ready for their afterparty. This song and more is on her new album “WYSIWYG” which means “what you see is what you get.”

Collymore put on a great performance, dressed in a gold bustier with a jean skirt with fringe. The unexpected surprise to her stylish on-stage presence was her comfortable white tennis shoes.

One would need comfortable shoes to catch all the action at the Toronto Street Festival. The venues were being held at sites from Yonge & Dundas to Yonge & Lawrence from the mid-town areas of Yonge & St. Clair and Yonge & Eglinton. The Yonge & Eglinton spot is where Andreena Mill and the Honey Jam Alumni performed on the 10th.

Mill, who was on first and has been compared to Alicia Keys. She is a classically trained pianist. Her sound had a definite funky vibe which was also expressed in the bright yellow jacket and knee socks with stripes she had on.

It was a hot day on Sunday and Mill did a jamming tune to heat up the crowd even more. Mill did a ballad she wrote after a bad relationship. One of the highlights was a song called “Rewind” where she also showed her vocal talent by singing without the band from the beginning. Her debut album will be out in 2006.

After Mill was the Honey Jam Alumni. This was a rare performance of all-female African-Canadian talent. The alumni included Kelly Lee Evans, Jocelyn Mercer, Andrea Lewis, Joy Lapps, Queen Cee, Lori Nuic, Black Pearl, and Motion.

Becoming an Educator: Teaching the next generation of journalists and media Professionals (Published on CABJ.ca)

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Writing (all kinds) on March 18, 2011 at 6:00 AM

Image result for Cartoon character of a black female teacher

It took me five years to teach in Toronto. My first teaching experience was at Carleton University in Ottawa as a Television Teaching Assistant. I later went on to teach in Kampala, Uganda at Makerere University (the oldest African university) and while I was a graduate student at Concordia University.

I had grown up in Toronto, however, once I reached the age of 18, due to work and school, I spent time outside of the city. I returned to Toronto for my longest stay in any one city since the age of 18 in 2001. I returned to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), as well as worked with Canoe.ca, Young People’s Press, the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration, freelance talent work, Media Research Institute, Share Newspaper, Pride Newsmagazine and New Dreamhomes and Condominiums Magazine to name a few. I really wanted to make the transition to teaching, and 40-year veteran of journalism Robert Payne helped me to make that transition.

I went to him for career coaching and he let me know in 2005 that there was a job opening in teaching at Centennial College. I applied for the full-time job and although I did not get it, it opened the door for me to teach my first course in Toronto at Centennial in Magazine Journalism that started January 2006.

This experience springboarded into working at Seneca College, University of Guelph-Humber, Humber College, Trebas Institute, George Brown College and Ryerson University. If I did not have my master’s degree from Concordia University in Montréal, I would not be able to do this work.

The landscape for what a lot of post-secondary institutions are asking of journalism educators is changing. Mike Karapita at Humber College calls it “credentializing.” There is a movement for educators to become more educated, and this is a big reason why I am currently doing my Ph.D. in Education at OISE/University of Toronto. I started May 2010.

The next generation of journalism educators has many challenges ahead of them. It is still a competitive market that grows even more competitive because those that are untrained in the field continue to make strides. Journalism education needs more of an emphasis on how young journalists can be entrepreneurs and successfully run their own freelancing business. This is effective from a tax perspective, as well as a job security perspective. Job security is an elusive thing these days; however young journalists can stay on top of this by working for a variety of employers.

If you would like more information on this topic, you can email Donna Kakonge at dkakonge@gmail.ccom.

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