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Posts Tagged ‘Canadian Books’

Comment parler aux gens fous + Plus en vente maintenant

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on January 12, 2018 at 3:00 AM

Trouver le cadeau parfait pour la saison Comment parler aux gens fous et comment écrire Creative Non-fiction à la fois par Donna Kakonge à

http://kakonged.com

Laurie Cover - 4

Laurie Cover - 4

Disponible dans un livre électronique, livre de poche et également relié.

Entrez les codes FELICITAS pour aujourd’hui seulement ou DECBOOKS12 à la caisse sur le site Lulu.com et obtenez 20% de réduction.

David Chariandy wins 2017 Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize – Courtesy of the CBC

In Writing (all kinds) on November 17, 2017 at 7:40 PM

Image result for brother by david chariandy

Congratulations David!

New Book: ‘Jackson Rising: The Struggle for Economic Democracy and Black Self-Determination in Jackson, Mississippi’

In Writing (all kinds) on October 24, 2017 at 7:22 PM
Greetings comrade,

I am encouraging you to buy and read this recently published anthology, Jackson Rising: The Struggle for Economic Democracy and Black Self-Determination in Jackson, Mississippi, that’s edited by Kali Akuno and I.

Kali and I are available to launch the book in your community or college or university campus…send the invitation and we will be there! We must develop the transitional programme in organizing the oppressed for the liquidation of capitalism.

 says:

 

“This is an essential book for understanding the vision and strategy of a remarkable social movement in the Deep South. It represents what I’ve found to be a rarity among recent US movements—a combination of revolutionary ambition and strategic rigor—and this deserves to be a model for other activists elsewhere. I had the privilege of reporting on this story firsthand (“The Revolutionary Life and Strange Death of a Radical Black Mayor,” VICE, April 2016), and I still learned a great deal from the texts collected here. Despite many setbacks, including Mayor Chokwe Lumumba’s death in office, the movement articulated here is alive and well, having just succeeded in electing Lumumba’s son to succeed him. This book is therefore not only an invaluable archive but a living document.”

Inline image 1

 says:

“Jackson Rising teaches us that when we commit ourselves to organizing, this cannot be only for a particular issue or for a singular campaign – but that it is long haul work, powered by a vision of freedom. This is also a necessary and important read for any of us who wish to understand how we might use electoral politics to advance progressive agendas that are accountable to the people. The inspiring story of Jackson is deeply radical, historically-rooted, and still in progress. It is also right on time.
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 says:

 
“Jackson Rising is essential reading to learn the lessons of one of the most successful 21st century examples of radical grassroots organizing. Buy the book, share it with your organization, make it required reading in your classes, read it aloud to your friends.”

Unity in Struggle,

 

Ajamu Nangwaya

“From the seeds of culture blossom flowers of resistance and liberation.”
-Amilcar Cabral, (September 12, 1924 – January 20, 1973)

“Revolution is the most dramatic appearance of a conscious people.”

– Walter Rodney

“The responsibility of an artist representing an oppressed people is to make revolution irresistible.”

– Toni Cade Bambara

Co-editor with Dr. Michael Truscello of Why Don’t The Poor Rise Up?: Organizing The Twenty-First Century Resistance (AK Press)

Toronto book launch: “Why Don’t The Poor Rise Up?: Organizing The Twenty-First Century Resistance”

In Writing (all kinds) on September 28, 2017 at 1:04 PM
Greetings comrade,
How are you doing?
Please join me for the launch of the book “Why Don’t The Poor Rise Up?: Organizing The Twenty-First Century Resistance” that I co-edited with Michael Truscello.
It is a timely intervention into the discussion on the question of the failure of the people in the Global South and North to engage in sustained mass revolts against the oppressive economic, social and political conditions that we are experiencing.

We can win but we must organize to effect our liberation. Come out and engage in the reasoning on how we are going to move forward collectively…see the relevant information below.
Why Don’t The Poor Rise Up?: Organizing is the Difference-maker

Join the Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/287235005093834/?active_tab=about

On Saturday evening Ajamu Nangwaya is joining us for Why Don’t The Poor Rise Up?: Organizing is the Difference-maker, the Toronto launch of Why Don’t The Poor Rise Up? Organizing Twenty-First Century Resistance at A Different Booklist to reflect on some of the barriers communities face when resisting violence and oppression. The book brings together perspectives from artists, activists, and academics across the global north and south to reflect on organizing and resistance to capitalism, state violence and lateral violence within community spaces. (More from AK Presshttps://www.akpress.org/why-don-t-the-poor-rise-up.html)

I’ll be talking a bit about my chapter on organizing against racism, bigotry, and violence within the labour movement. It would be awesome to see a few friendly faces around to celebrate with us! 

Inline image 1
 
Join us for the Toronto launch of “Why Don’t The Poor Rise Up: Organizing the Twenty-First Century Resistance.”

Ellie Ade Kur, author of the chapter “Organizing With Solidarity in Mind: Notes on Social Movement Unionism and Critical Equity Work” and Ajamu Nangwaya, a co-editor of the book, will share their perspectives on the book’s themes and the types of actions that are needed to organize and fight for liberation/the good and just society.

WHEN: Saturday, September 30, 2017

TIME: 6:30PM – 9:30PM

WHERE: A Different Booklist Cultural Centre, 779 Bathurst Street, Toronto, ON (one block north of Bloor Street West)

Each of these essays is a sharpened weapon for the battles looming large on the horizon.” —George Ciccariello-Maher, author of Building the Commune

“Combining the most creative thought from the global North and South, Why Don’t the Poor Rise Up? promises to be an indispensable resource for understanding why the new revolutionary movement of the 21st century will emerge from the ranks of the most marginalized by capitalism and colonialism.” —Ajamu Baraka, editor of Black Agenda Report

“Capitalism is not the answer to poverty but rather its cause! This collection presents diverse global and radical perspectives on the poor and poverty while demonstrating concretely how and why the poor do rise up! Importantly, the collection presents strategies for building social movements of the radical Left that are a meaningful alternative to the populist right currently in ascendancy.” —Dr. Anna Kasafi Perkins, Catholic theologian, Kingston, Jamaica

Why don’t the poor rise up? Even mainstream media like the New York Times and The Economist have recently posed this question, uneasily amazed that capitalism hasn’t met with greater resistance. In the context of unparalleled global wealth disparity, ecological catastrophe, and myriad forms of structural oppression, this vibrant collection offers a reassessment of contemporary obstacles to mass mobilization, as well as examples from around the world of poor people overcoming those obstacles in inspiring and instructive new ways. With contributions from Idle No More organizer Alex Wilson, noted Italian autonomist Franco “Bifo” Berardi, Cooperation Jackson organizer Kali Akuno, Cape Town-based anarchists Aragorn Eloff and Anna Selmeczi, and sixteen other scholars and activists from around the world, including a Foreword by Affiong Limene Affiong, Nigerian co-founder of Moyo wa Taifa, a Pan-Afrikan Women’s Solidarity Network, Why Don’t the Poor Rise Up? presents a truly global range of perspectives that explore the question of revolution, its objective and subjective prerequisites, and its increasing likelihood in our time.

 
Unity in Struggle,


Ajamu Nangwaya

“From the seeds of culture blossom flowers of resistance and liberation.”
-Amilcar Cabral, (September 12, 1924 – January 20, 1973)

“Revolution is the most dramatic appearance of a conscious people.”

– Walter Rodney

“The responsibility of an artist representing an oppressed people is to make revolution irresistible.”

– Toni Cade Bambara

My Books for Librarians to Purchase and for You to Borrow From the Library

In Writing (all kinds) on April 18, 2017 at 10:48 AM

Library Services of Canada

Toronto Public Library

MaryAnn Hayatian

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Technology, travel, Writing (all kinds) on February 14, 2015 at 3:00 AM


Bjorn Borg

MaryAnn Hayatian was born and raised in the east coast of Canada.

She’s an author,artist and teacher that has written, designed and published books in genres. Read the rest of this entry »

Flower Press publishes A Gopher’s Christmas Adventure by Pierre Fiset and Damiano Ferraro

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Technology, Writing (all kinds) on February 13, 2015 at 3:00 AM


Orlando Flex Tickets - Save Over $10!

Flower Press publishes A Gopher’s Christmas Adventure by Pierre Fiset and Damiano Ferraro

April 2012

Flower Press has recently published “A Gopher’s Christmas Adventure” by Pierre Fiset and Damiano Ferraro.

Pages: 69
ISBN: 978-0-9877632-2-8

This book is about a Christmas adventure underground. Why underground, you say? That’s because it’s about gophers and that is where they live and where they go to school. Their world is very similar to ours and it’s happening right under our feet… Read the rest of this entry »

Second Book Launch at A Different Booklist – TBA

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on July 12, 2014 at 7:35 PM

Come join me to launch the book How To Talk To Crazy People at A Different Booklist at Bathurst and Bloor in Toronto!

What?: Copies are available of How To Talk To Crazy People by Donna Kakonge at A Different Booklist in Toronto

Where?: 746 Bathurst St., Toronto, ON M5S 2R6, Tel: 416-538-0889, email:info@adifferentbooklist.com,http://www.adifferentbooklist.com

How?: Go to the store :-)!!!!! Check out the opening hours on the website 🙂

When?: How To Talk To Crazy People Book Launch at A Different Booklist

TBA

Location: 746 Bathurst Street Thank You and See You There!

How?: Go to the store :-)!!!!! Check out the opening hours on the website 🙂

Affiliates, Place Your Own Advertising Text Here. (ie) Click Here To Enter Merchant Website And View Products.

Pinnacle of Vandalism (A selection of thoughts, feelings and musings) by R. William Patry will steal your heart

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on March 4, 2014 at 8:52 PM

me and pov

I am a warrior of mighty battles and I challenge a mighty foe

A dreamer of endless passions that capsizes in an undertow

Of swirling visions and endless fears blown up in front of me

Being chased by demons of evil nature trying to set me free.

  Read the rest of this entry »

Select From More Than 50 Book Titles on Lulu.com by Donna Kakonge

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on February 28, 2014 at 10:28 AM

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Only My Voice: Vignettes of Crazy People Singing to Stay Sane is Available

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on December 22, 2013 at 11:28 PM

Purchase Donna Kakonge’s Latest Book online today:

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Also Available on:

Amazon

Kobo

Teresa Madaleno on ThatChannel.com with Girl Power: Chronicles of the True Power of Female Friendships

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on December 4, 2013 at 10:45 PM

Buy it Today at:

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Save 20% on How To Talk To Crazy People and How To Write Creative Nonfiction at Lulu.com

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on July 15, 2013 at 7:59 PM

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In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on June 3, 2013 at 7:19 AM

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Meet The Author at Accents on Eglinton Bookstore Every Sunday Afternoon from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on April 29, 2013 at 2:42 PM
Photo by Alice Romo

Photo by Alice Romo

What: Donna Kakonge How To Talk To Crazy People. All of her 45 books on sale.

Where: 1790 Eglinton Ave. West @ Dufferin in Toronto…meter parking in front of street, Green P parking lot close to Maria Shukra library across the street, gas station across the street in southwest corner, Tim Hortons to the south, bookstore – Accents in the northwest corner of Dufferin and Eglinton in relation to Yonge Street…restaurants and clothing stores close by, plus banks, 32 Eglinton West bus stop close by and 29 Dufferin bus minutes walk away

When: Every Sunday from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., meet the author. 

How: Abubacar Fofana who owns the store rocks! Everyone who enters the place rocks!

Why: The book is bloody good and that is the truth Ruth! Everyone tells Donna and everyone else! They are not even lying 🙂 LOL!

ALSO MEET THE AUTHOR EVERY SUNDAY FROM 3:00 P.M. TO 5:00 P.M. STARTING  APRIL 14, 2013 FROM 3:00 P.M. TO 5:00 P.M. – SAME LOCATION – MY BOOKS WILL BE THERE TOO WITH NEW COVER

Contact: 647-352-8558

How to Talk to Crazy People By Donna Kakonge Reviewed by Joseph Maldonado, MS

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on March 20, 2013 at 1:31 PM

How to Talk to Crazy People

By Donna Kakonge

Reviewed by Joseph Maldonado, MS

Many different types of people, for many different reasons, read memoirs about mental illness. Some may be suffering from an illness themselves and are looking for guidance or inspiration. Some may have questions as a result of their friend’s or family member’s suffering. Others may be professionals in the mental health field. Then there are those who simply find such stories interesting. Donna Kakonge’s How to Talk to Crazy People is a memoir that will appeal to all such readers. Read the rest of this entry »

Free Ground Shipping at http://lulu.com/spotlight/kakonged

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on March 15, 2013 at 9:59 AM

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Save 20% on Donna Kakonge`s Books at: http://lulu.com/spotlight/kakonged

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on March 6, 2013 at 8:29 AM

Enter code MARCHBOOKS13  – lasts the whole month

Enter code SPARK – until March 8, 2013

Donna Kakonge on “Liquid Lunch” With ThatChannel.com + Books Now in Kobo Store

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on March 1, 2013 at 3:40 PM

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Get 20% Off How To Talk To Crazy People And The New How To Write Creative Non-fiction

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on February 21, 2013 at 2:22 PM

Enter code FEBBOOKS13 @ http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/kakonged

Look on www.donnakakonge.com to select your book/s!

How To Talk To Crazy People Now On Sale

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on January 9, 2013 at 3:00 AM

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It is also available on Amazon Kindle

How To Talk To Crazy People and More On Sale Now

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on January 7, 2013 at 8:29 AM

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Also Available on Amazon Kindle

 

How To Talk To Crazy People and More On Sale – Your Personal Numerology Report With Purchase

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on January 3, 2013 at 7:09 PM

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Use the code AMPLIUS or JANBOOKS13

Send me an email at: dkakonge@sympatico.ca with proof of purchase, the name on your birth certificate and your date of birth and I will generate a more than 200-page Hans Decoz numerology report for you.

Boxing Day

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on December 26, 2012 at 3:00 AM

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Lulu.com Coupons for 13 Days – How To Talk To Crazy People + More Now on Sale

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on December 17, 2012 at 11:36 AM

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Last Day To Get How To Talk To Crazy People Before the 24th – ENTER CODE FELICITAS

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on December 13, 2012 at 10:30 PM

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How To Talk To Crazy People Available

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on December 13, 2012 at 12:36 PM

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This week at Accents Bookstore: The Book of Negroes+ Poetry+La Peña de Rosy+ Nadijah Robinson Art Show (September 27/2012-September30/2012)‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Technology, travel, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on September 26, 2012 at 11:04 AM

This week at Accents on Eglinton BOOKSTORE

September 27/2012-September 30/2012

1790 Eglinton Ave. W. (at Dufferin), phone: 647-352-8558

 

 

 

Thursday, September 27/2012

READING BLACK CANADA presents a discussion of Lawrence Hill’s 

“THE BOOK OF NEGROES” 

Organizer: Spotlighting and Promoting African Canadian Experiences (S.P.A.C.E Network) Read the rest of this entry »

Canada stuck-up about its writing, but not too much

In book reviews, Business, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Events, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Writing (all kinds) on July 11, 2012 at 3:00 AM
Rachel Muenz Writes About the Giller Prize - Photo Courtesy of Stockexpert.com

Rachel Muenz Writes About the Giller Prize – Photo Courtesy of Stockexpert.com

Image result for Giller Prize

By Rachel Muenz

Canada has often been criticized for being too snobby about its writing.

William Deverell recently wrote in the National Post that in Canada “there is a push to reward insipid stuff that will never sell” and Canadian publishing is suffering because of this.

I partly agree.

Though I’ve liked most Giller Prize and Governor General’s Award winners I’ve read, they usually aren’t packed with thrills and excitement. If they hadn’t won awards, I probably wouldn’t have bought them in the first place unless someone told me they were really good.

But this doesn’t mean that Canada should break out the awards for anything that sells well.

Canadian schools, libraries, and literary awards should choose books that both entertain readers and change them through the themes and techniques the books use to tell their stories.

There’s not much point in rewarding beautifully-written, thought-provoking books that people find too boring or difficult to read. A book’s message will never make an impact if only three people read it.

Yet, books that are just dumb entertainment without getting readers thinking shouldn’t be pushed either even if they do make big money. Canadian popular fiction writers should only be honoured if they also give their readers something meaningful to think about and debate.

Along with excellent storytelling and entertainment, good writing should always be important as well.

It wouldn’t be fair to writers who spend hours perfecting every sentence to give the Giller Prize or Governor General’s Award for a book that sells millions but is badly-written. Crappy writing should never be encouraged.

Yes, Canada needs to open its heart to popular fiction, but not too wide.

– with files from the National Post

My Books Available @ Accents on Eglinton – 1790 Eglinton Avenue West @ Dufferin Street in Toronto, Ontario, Canada

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on March 1, 2012 at 3:43 PM

Image result for Accents on Eglinton Bookstore at Artscape Wychwood Barns in Toronto

Facebook link: http://www.facebook.com/events/452277591496604/

 Accents Bookstore on Eglington at 1790 Eglinton Ave. West is having a Pop-Up Shop on Saturday, December 15th from 1-6pm. The pop up shop will feature art, books, fashion, beauty products and more highlighting the work of diasporic African, Latin, and Caribbean people. We are contacting you to find out if you’re interesting in vending and selling your products at this pop-up shop.

I will be there selling my books, as well as How To Talk To Crazy People.

It is also available at: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/kakonged?searchTerms=How+To+Talk+To+Crazy+People and soon on Amazon.

Also find out more about the event here:

Looking for that special gift for the holidays? Or just want to check out what your local artisans and entrepreneurs are doing?

 

Accents Bookstore on Eglinton Av W (@Dufferin) is having a Pop Up Shop on Saturday, December 15th from 1-6pm. The Pop Up Shop will feature art, books, fashion, beauty products and more highlighting the work of diasporic African, Latin, and Caribbean people.

PLEASE remember to invite your friends, fans, clients, and customers to the event. Post on your facebook page, social media, blog, twitter etc. The Facebook link is provided below. 

http://www.facebook.com/events/452277591496604/
Featuring: 
Cha’coal
Be Classy Boutique

Asikere Afana

Art Card (Prints of original paintings by A.Itwaru & Natasha Ksonzek)
Black Empowerment

Disfiyu (Professional Skin Care)
Donna Kakonge (writer)
Guillermina Castillo
Love Jewelry and Accessories
Luze.Arte
Max International
Reflection Designs

Global Wealth Trade
Thelma Nozzaci (writer)
Tray Arts
Wild Moon Jewelry

Bernard & Andrea Richards (art)

Gregory Frank (drummer)

Cuban Coffee &(Cubita+Serrano+Turquino)+ Music

Children Books
+ more

Special !!!!! Accents’ Gift Cards available!
Saturday, December 15, 2012
1-6pm

Accents Bookstore
1790 Eglinton Ave W
(@ Dufferin)

Phone: 647-352-8558.

Where Does Identity, Beauty and Spirituality Fit into Black Feminist Thought?: The Politics of the Black Women Inside and Outside Education

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Health, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Religion, Technology, travel, Writing (all kinds) on April 16, 2011 at 3:00 AM

Cover of Garfield Ellis’s Till I’m Laid to Rest – Photo Courtesy of Google Images

It is our roots that give us structure. It is our roots that make us black feminists. It is our roots that give us an identity. It is our roots that give us beauty. It is our roots that give us spirituality. It is our roots that make us black women inside and outside of education.
My father is from Uganda. My mother is from St. Vincent & the Grenadines. I am from Canada. I have always seen these identifying geographical landscapes as placing me where I can find my family roots. These geographical places also help me to form a triad identity of African-Caribbean-Canadian.

My grandfather and grandmother on my father’s side were educators. My father worked as a biology professor at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda. My grandmother on my mother’s side was a principal of a school in St. Vincent. My mother has worked as an English teacher in Canada to children in Korea by telephone. I, too, teach at Centennial College and tutor various subjects for Community Outreach Canada, as well as being a Ph.D. Student at OISE/University of Toronto.

With my identity being that of African-Caribbean-Canadian, my beauty stemming from my African super curly hair, Ugandan-woman inspired rounded body, and my spirituality embracing God – where does black feminist thought fit in? What is black feminist thought? How do these markers I have used to guide the way of the path to understanding black feminist thought demarcate with varying shades of brown and black colours to indicate identity, beauty, and spirituality within black feminist thought – to me? How can these markers affect a deeper understanding for those black women inside education? And a question for those black women who are outside education; how do these markers of identity, beauty and spirituality colour their lives and add the much-needed water to keeping their roots nourished?

To answer these questions, I will be focusing on issues of identity, beauty, and spirituality as discussed in the winter 2011 Black Feminist Thought class with Professor Erica Neeganagwedgin at OISE/University of Toronto. This is the beginning of embarking on an exploration of relating Black Feminist Thought to black hair politics. First I will discuss identity, followed with a discussion of beauty stemming from one of the course’s presentation texts, and finally, I will discuss spirituality.

Issues Around Identity

“As Black women, we need not spend time abstractly theorizing because our practice informs our theory” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 5). As supported by Theorizing Empowerment: Canadian Perspectives on Black Feminist Thought (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007), I picked up my pen and wrote about how this triad of my African-Caribbean-Canadian identity shapes my life through a connection of identity and beauty, which the latter will be discussed later. Here is an example from my book Spiderwoman (Kakonge, 2007) that also aired on the CBC throughout Canada:

Black Hair
Get a group of Black women together and the conversation usually turns to hair.
If I had a dollar for every time I’ve heard a Black woman’s hair story – talked about my own hair – seen people talking about hair in a movie – or read about hair in a book – well, I could buy a lot of hair.

I used to think I was the only one who changed my hair just about every week. But now I know that many other women have permed, straightened, coloured, cut, lengthened and shortened their hair as often as I have.

When I was a child, my first hobby was playing hairdresser to my Barbie dolls. I grew up in the seventies and eighties but I was not much different from Black children in the forties.

Back then, Black children chose White dolls over Black dolls in a landmark study that led to the desegregation of American schools.

It was not that I preferred creamy white skin over chocolate. It just came down to hair. I wanted straight, long, blonde, brunette or red hair – hair that blew in the wind – hair that I could toss over my shoulder.

And when wishing it didn’t make it appear on my head, I used a towel instead.
As I grew older, I spent many years in hair salons turning my head of curly hair dead straight – walking out of the salons with the wind blowing through my hair – and tossing it over my shoulder.

Who says wishes don’t come true – for a price.

Although straightening Black hair is known as perming, there was never anything permanent about it for me. There was a war happening on my head. If my hair represented a people, the curly strands were being ethnically cleansed by straight strands with the use of chemical warfare.

Yet despite the chemicals, I’ve always loved the atmosphere of a salon. In this predominantly white country, Black hair salons create a Black world. During the civil rights movement, North American barber shops and hair salons became town halls for discussions on race relations.

Even now, a hair salon in South Carolina is being used to educate people about AIDS. Places for hair are no strangers to political activity.

And it is in a salon that I found peace with the politics happening in my own head. Hairdressers looking at my natural hair – and not opening up a jar of Bone Strait – made me rejoice in the hair God gave me.

Professor and author Gloria Wade-Gayles once said: “my hair would be a badge, a symbol of my pride, a statement of self-affirmation.”

Well, it has taken me a long time, but I finally agree.

Currently researching the politics of black hair at OISE/University of Toronto in a Ph.D. program of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning Development, the above shows how much my hair is part of my identity, as well how it inspires me to write and to think. The above also exemplifies the words of Rai Reece’s “Canadian Black Feminist Thought and Scholar-Activist Praxis,” in Theorizing Empowerment (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007). Reece notes that there is a critical need for more black female academics, as well as black female activists in the academy. Reece goes onto her second point that there is no single “axis” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 267) where black feminism needs to be explored. As I discuss in the excerpt from Spiderwoman (Kakonge, 2007), my natural hair was something that made me feel a want to flee from my identity as a black person. My natural hair was something that made me feel a want to perceive myself as ugly. My natural hair was something that made me feel a want to look like the other pretty black women on TV, like Janet Jackson in “Good Times” and Roxy Roper on “The Jeffersons.” My hair became a personal indicator for me of not accepting my roots – not accepting how God made me – not accepting my identity.

Notisha Massaquoi in “An Unsettled Feminist Discourse,” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007), writes about her identity connecting that with her family roots of a Sierra Leonean father and a Trinidadian mother. Massaquoi was once called a “Diasporic Baby” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 75). Massaquoi goes onto to quote Njoki Nathani Wane (2002): “A black feminist theory from a Canadian perspective is truly a construction of embodied knowledge that is grounded in the bodily experience of specific materiality” (Wane 2002) (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 76). The challenges with the natural hair of black women is an embodied knowledge that is played out in images of black women with smooth, straight, controlled hair – hair that resembles whites. I have not ever seen a black woman working in a bank with an afro, whereas I have seen afros among black female professors. I have not ever seen a black woman who was a doctor wearing natural hair, whereas I have seen natural hair on black Canadian singing stars. I have not ever seen a black woman with skin as dark as the reflection of my eyes closed, anchoring the six o’clock news on any television station. Black women have developed an embodied knowledge of their place in society. Black women are viewed, mainly by whites, through visions of their bodily physical appearances and all of the stereotypes and the archetypes embodied in what black women can or cannot do. Our roots to Canada are threatened every time an “other” asks, “Where do you come from?”
With the uprooting of African peoples from the continent, colonization and the diaspora where many of us are born, it can be difficult to answer that question at times: “Where do you come from?” as a black woman in Canada. Although a work of fiction, Till I’m Laid to Rest by Garfield Ellis (2010) also tells a story that is true for many of home displacement for women who mainly conduct themselves outside of education. For the protagonist of Ellis’s story, Shirley Temple Brown, it is Shirley’s beauty, Shirley’s hair, Shirley’s identity, which ultimately embodies her relationship to the men that change her life and create an understanding of black feminist thought that uproots her. Shirley, who settles well in her homeland in Jamaica, makes the choices to aspire to European ideals of success that wind up entrapping her in a web of misery that has her returning to Jamaica in shackles and shame. This results in her disconnection from the strong roots of her Jamaican heritage, which will be explored further through issues of beauty and later in issues of spirituality.

Issues Around Beauty

Shirley Temple Brown in Till I’m Laid to Rest (Ellis, 2010) is viewed as more beautiful than her friend Dawn who is of darker skin and has a coarser hair texture when compared to Shirley’s hair. Shirley is half-Indian on her father’s side and based on her looks, does not identify with being black. An example of Shirley defining her identity with other than black takes place when she is on a date with a younger white man she meets on a Miami beach who claims to be a model agent:

“You know I’ve never dated a black woman before,” he said, as they continued walking.

“I’m not black,” Shirley said.

“I thought you said you were Jamaican.”

“I am.”

“Then you are black.”

“I am half-Indian,” Shirley said.

“Is that like Hispanic or something? Your parents are not Jamaican, uh?

“They are.” She sipped the wine.

“So how do you mean you are not black?”

“Do I look black to you?” Shirley wanted to change the subject. He obviously did not understand.

He paused, unsure. “I guess.”

“It does not matter.” Shirley dropped the subject (Ellis, 2010, pg. 168-169).

However, it does matter. Shirley is denying her blackness or does not realize that she considered black in a country such as America, unlike her more Indian identity in a country such as Jamaica, as Professor Erica Neeganagwedgin has explained in class about identity formation in Jamaica. There is another point in the Ellis (2010) book where Shirley is speaking with her husband Moet and states that she did not know she was black until she came to America. The fact this so-called white model agent was certain she was black at first, then unsure at Shirley’s denial of being black, is a situation that is not resolved since Shirley drops the subject, claiming “it does not matter” (Ellis, 2010, pg. 169). Yet, is there something wrong with being black? Shirley had no problem with the Indian in her family; by stating she is “half-Indian” (Ellis, 2010, pg. 168). When you look at the historical legacy of black people in the Americas, wrenched out in chest-pounding words that spring from the page by poet d’bi young at the beginning of Theorizing Empowerment: Canadian Perspectives on Black Feminist Thought (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007) a thoughtful answer to the question, what is wrong with being black surfaces:

here we have a negro wench
gentlemen and gentlemen
starting at four hundred dollars
strong hands/strong legs/strong spirit
but not stronger than yours (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 2).

Shirley, despite her long, black and silky half-Indian tresses had previously lived the experience using her strong hands, strong legs and strong spirit working for a white family and their children who turned her into a modern-day “negro wench” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 2). Later on, in this scene of Till, I’m Laid to Rest with Shirley Temple Brown as its star, Shirley’s conversation with the so-called model agent turns to violence as he seems to stick to his original thoughts that she is black and he attempts to rape her…remembering that Shirley’s power is not stronger than his (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 2). Shirley acts fast and runs for safety back to her job of looking after a retired model with Alzheimer’s disease. The brutal violence forced on Shirley by the younger white man goes unmentioned in Till I’m Laid to Rest (Ellis, 2010) after, as though Shirley should have expected nothing less. This disregard and lack of the care of Shirley’s body, mind and spirit was all a part of her life in Miami that began when she met Mark, the older rich businessman who worked in the tourism industry and put the idea of coming to Miami into Shirley’s head. The character Mark in the novel seems to remind Shirley of her late father who died in a car accident. The first man to put the idea of “greatness” into Shirley’s head was her father who even named after the movie star Shirley Temple, hence her name being Shirley Temple Brown. With Shirley’s identity and beauty politics tied into colonization, as many of us of colour do have our identity and beauty politics tied into colonization, thoughts of where “greatness” lies are often seen in the west. Thoughts of where “greatness” lie is not in the west of the Caribbean necessarily, however in America, in Europe at times for some…these are the places where dreams await people of colour – the American Dream is a classic one. Shirley went to America to find her dream and instead because she was acutely made aware of her black identity, she realized a shattered dream.

Shirley first met Mark at the Mutual Security Bank where she worked in Kingstown, Jamaica. Mark was bringing in a lot of money and discussed his banking with Shirley many times since she was the junior manager. Shirley could see that Mark was rich and when he asked her out for a date, she agreed. He took her to decadent places, showing her how the wealthy in Jamaica live. This was different for Shirley, having grown up poor. This was different for Shirley, also having grown up without her father who died in a car crash. Shirley and Mark’s first sexual liaison was on a bed of roses with some thorns:

“What are you doing?” She made to turn and stumbled onto the bed. He pushed her onto it and she fought him back. But he was heavy and big, and although he held her lightly his grasp was firm.

“Mind you scrape yourself on the basket,” he said huskily.

“Stop,” she whispered. “Mark, stop a little. We have to discuss this.”

“Mind you head,” he said, as he tried to shove the basket away. “Mind you head.”

She struggled with him for a while but he held her down and managed to slip both her hands through the strings of her dress (Ellis, 2010, pg. 13).

Mark forced himself on Shirley and took away her virginity. Later in this scene of Till, I’m Laid to Rest (Ellis, 2010), Shirley clearly gives in…simply surrendering to a man that had been lavishing her with pricey restaurants and Victoria Secret underwear gifts once he was tired of playing the game of cat and mouse. Shirley clearly gives in…simply surrendering to her status as a working-class woman, from a poor Jamaican background. Mark trapped Shirley. A beautiful young woman such as Shirley who would not have ever given a second glance at Mark on the street if he did not have the economic capital that he possesses – she was bought out. Shirley was tempted to do so because of her poor economic status growing up and her emotional aspirations to realize the dreams that her deceased father had set out for her. Llana James writes about the “Censure and Silence: Sexual Violence and Women of the African Diaspora” in Theorizing Empowerment. James (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007) writes that points of entry of women of the African diaspora into a country are important considerations when you look at sexual violence. When looking at Shirley Temple Brown’s situation in Till I’m Laid to Rest, the sexual violence of Mark is what links her to this man in a way that leads her to Miami. Another turning point is what was mentioned earlier with the sexual violence of the so-called model agent who forces himself on Shirley without success, however successfully leading Shirley to a party that connects her to Moet – the man she later marries and is also the cause of her serving jail time and being deported back to Jamaica.

Enter Shirley Temple Brown’s mother…a woman who is so devoted to God that she prays and reads The Bible day and night, night and day. She lives in a one-room shanty house with a wall that threatens to fail her in Sufferer’s Heights, Jamaica. She works cleaning for others at a hospital. She has no criminal record. She has a son who is a police officer in Jamaica. She is always there for her daughter Shirley – this…Shirley can ALWAYS count on until the day Miss Ivey passes. Her roots are in Jamaica and Miss Ivey rests and stays there, despite the poverty in her life. Is Shirley Temple Brown’s mother an example that faith in God, or having a spiritual life is exactly what can keep black women become rooted? Is Shirley Temple Brown’s mother an example that faith in God can keep mind, body and spirit, or identity, beauty, and spirit together?

Issues of Spirituality

For Miss Ivey, the life of glamour with a potentially married white man, the life of an illegal immigrant, the life of a maid to white people, the life of marrying a drug dealer is evidently beyond the life she had imagined for her daughter Shirley Temple Brown. Miss Ivey criticizes her daughter’s lifestyle with each meeting with her. The following is also evidently more in Miss Ivey’s mind of the way she would want her daughter to live: “At some deeper level all living things are interconnected and there is a desire or a determination to live a life characterized by humility, empathy, mindfulness and purpose” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 27). This statement was written by Professor Erica Neeganagwedgin and Professor Njoki Wane at OISE/University of Toronto clearly sets a marker for the way many black women would love to live. Despite Shirley Temple Brown’s problems in Till I’m Laid to Rest (Ellis, 2010), she also indicates that she is searching for the same things that Neegangwedgin and Wane point out in Theorizing Empowerment (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007). Shirley is always in search of living a life of “humility, empathy, mindfulness and purpose” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 27). She leaves her mother for Mark in the search. She leaves Jamaica in a search. She leaves the white family in a search. She leaves Miami to return to Jamaica in a search. Then, despite her searching and because her roots are so damaged, as her relationship with Miss Ivey (her mother) continue to erode and she sees her friends move on with their lives – her search for identity, beauty (and the beautiful life), and spirituality land her in jail. She humbly returns to Jamaica in handcuffs as she is deported after four years of being in jail. She serves jail time because she was helping her drug-dealing husband Moet who she at first married to live in luxury (which coming from poverty was something she did not know), and she later fell in love with him because he was a sincere, but dangerous man.

Wane’s (2007) “Practicing African Spirituality: Insights from Zulu-Latifa, an African Woman Healer” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007), gives tools for the way women such as Shirley Temple Brown can identify and recapture their soul. Many times the spiritual tools that we receive are handed down to us through our mothers. I rebelled against my mother when I was younger – not heeding her wise words. Although I did not end up in the same kind of trouble that Shirley Temple Brown ended up in, this disconnection from her originally connecting me with the Methodist church and the teachings of God was something that I came to understand only through an on-going path to maturity. It is also an on-going path that informs my work as a black female educator.

Conclusion
By exploring issues around identity with my own personal call to pick up the pen and write about the politics of black hair with the support of Theorizing Empowerment (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007), as well as entwining branches with others inside education with a shared “Diasporic Baby” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 75) identity and understanding of how my identity has formed with a lack of representation in Canadian culture and media, I call for more black female academics to pick up their pen and tell their stories, to entwine their branches through words, collectives, and organizing and to push for more representation in Canadian culture and media.
By exploring issues around beauty, I encourage those women outside education who are treated as black to demand just treatment from men and other women – from everyone and everything. Women must understand that their lives also serve to educate others, even if it is through written fiction and through the telling of the truth of their value and beauty – only this way, will their roots be preserved.

By exploring issues around spirituality we must look to our mothers and to the elders of society to guide us on our spiritual paths. As there are many branches on a tree, there are many routes to the creator and we must find one that works best for us to preserve the sanctity of our lives as black women.

It is our roots that give us structure. It is our roots that make us black feminists. It is our roots that give us an identity. It is our roots that give us beauty. It is our roots that give us spirituality. It is our roots that make us black women inside and outside of education.

References
Ellis, G. (2010). Till I’m Laid to Rest. Nsemia Press, Oakville, Canada.
Kakonge, D. (2007). Spiderwoman. Lulu.com: Self-Published.
Massaquoi, N. and Wane, N. (2007). Theorizing Empowerment: Canadian Perspectives on Black Feminist Thought. Inanna Publications: Toronto.

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