Know

Posts Tagged ‘Canada’

[GAC_Canada] Canada agrees to pay millions to indigenous people taken from their homes

In Writing (all kinds) on October 23, 2017 at 7:26 PM

The Associated Press Published 4:51 p.m. ET Oct. 6, 2017

First Nations people wait for the Walk for Reconciliation to begin in Vancouver, B.C., on Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017. The two-kilometer walk was held to promote positive relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada. (Photo: Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP)

CONNECTTWEETLINKEDIN 1COMMENTEMAILMORE

TORONTO — The Canadian government has agreed to pay compensation to indigenous people who were taken from their homes and adopted into non-indigenous families.

Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett announced the settlement Friday in what’s known as the “Sixties Scoop.” Indigenous children were robbed of their cultural identities by being placed with non-native families by child welfare services during the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. Many lost touch with their culture and language.

The settlement for an estimated 20,000 people is aimed at resolving numerous related lawsuits. The victims will share 750 million Canadian dollars ($596 million), with individual amounts to be determined later. Many said they expected a settlement of around 50,000 Canadian dollars each.

Lead plaintiff Marcia Brown Martel, who was taken by child welfare officials and adopted by a non-native family, called events the “stealing of children.”

“I have great hope that because we’ve reached this plateau that this will never, ever happen in Canada again,” said Brown Martel, who was placed in the foster system as a child and suffered emotional, physical and sexual abuse.

Many had mixed emotions about the settlement.

“I had no idea I was native until I was a teenager,” Colleen Cardinal told The Associated Press. Cardinal was taken from her biological family at the age of two in Alberta and adopted into a non-indigenous family in Ontario along with her two older sisters. She said her sisters were sexually molested by their adopted father.

“There were ongoing attempts to assimilate our people into the mainstream culture,” she said, adding that the settlement doesn’t amount to much.

“It’s quite disappointing,” she said. “It’s quite low. It should be CA$80,000 or $100,000. A lot of us were taken out of the province, out of the country, taken so far away from our families.” Cardinal now lives with post-traumatic stress disorder.

Ontario Superior Court Justice Edward Belobaba ruled in February that Canada had breached its “duty of care” to the children and found the government liable.

A tearful Bennett, the government minister, said she couldn’t understand how it was allowed to happen.

“I don’t know what people were thinking,” she said.

The settlement package also includes up to 50 million Canadian dollars for a healing and reconciliation foundation.

The agreement is a “first step” in resolving Sixties Scoop litigation, Bennett added, noting the federal government is committed to working with other indigenous peoples affected.

The Sixties Scoop echoes the history of residential schools in Canada.

Some 150,000 First Nations, Inuit and Metis children were taken from their families over much of the last century and put in government schools, where they were forced to convert to Christianity and not allowed to speak their native languages. Many were beaten and verbally abused, and up to 6,000 are said to have died.

Canada’s previous prime minister made a historic apology in 2008 to residential school survivors.

Life in Canada by Joy (A Pseudonym)

In Writing (all kinds) on October 6, 2017 at 10:20 AM

And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose.         

                                                             Romans 8:28

 

I moved to Toronto in August 2010. As I started my new life in Toronto I did not know a single person. I was not prepared for the high rental prices of Toronto and, after being priced out of rental housing close to the University, I finally ended up renting almost an hour away by bus and subway from the university.  During the first year, I spent a lot of time traveling as well as studying and found that my greatest challenge concerned my housing environment rather than academics.  The problem was that I had neighbors (a couple) in my apartment that liked to turn loud the movie/music and fight and drink until the early morning. I called the building security guard/manager and reported them 3 or 4 times per week. Eventually, they became tired of me and said that I had to report it to the police by myself. I lived in the building until my contract of one year was up.

In my second year, I lived in a five-story building of a Jewish owner. This time, I had issues that arose regarding both loud music and loud children as well as the dirty state of the building.  I was once again seen as a troublemaker because I complained so much. This time I reached the unbearable point one day when I discovered a dead mouse on the bathroom floor that had seemed to come from a small hole in my closet. Again, as soon as my one-year contract ended I left the apartment.                    

I then decided I needed a new approach to housing.  My solution was to seek a rental room in a house. I lived with a Chinese couple about two years and after that they wanted to sell the house. So quickly, I found another new place. Now I continue to rent a small room in a house of another Chinese couple.                                  

The years quickly passed and are now almost a blur.  I met many good people who I learned with and from. I studied hard and was completely satisfied with every single grade I received except for one where the professor made it very clear that failure to support her views on a particular social topic in the class discussion would be penalized.  It was the one class where I felt dissatisfied with my grade.  

Otherwise, I had some very good professors.  I hesitate to mention specific professors because I fear I might leave out other good ones.  However, there was one professor that I do have to mention. He had received an early Confucian oriented education that was probably much like mine and he had later somehow ended up teaching at the university.  The reason I have to mention him is that he is living proof that you do not have to be a native English speaker and a cultural native to be an effective teacher of learners who are. The Chinese Confucian educational model has a term for those who have traveled far along the Dao, the way of the Heavens.  The term used for such a person/teacher is “junzi”. This particular teacher made me proud to be Confucian Chinese in the background. His superior knowledge, his ethical treatment of learners, and his kind caring attitude toward learning and learners gave clear evidence of his progress along the Dao and of his status as junzi.

At present, I have finished my work at the university this year and have received the degree toward which my effort for so long has been aimed.  However, it was with deepest thanks and appreciation to all my dear OISE professors, friends, colleagues and OISE staff that I ended my journey in Toronto. I understood that without their spiritual support, suggestions, encouragement and their help, I would not have finished.

My next step is following God’s instruction where He wants me to serve Him.

The New Canadian Experience from Joy (Pen Name)

In Writing (all kinds) on August 3, 2017 at 8:48 PM

But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control (Galatians 5:22-23)

Canadians are kind people!

I am from East Asia.  Before I came to Toronto, my first residence was in Calgary for about three months.  I was used to a subtropical island climate and when I came it was winter in Calgary.  It was the winter that I learned that minus 40 degrees Celsius is the same as minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Talk about a shock. The cold was unbelievable but even more unbelievable was that I saw a man wearing shorts.  I thought, what tough people these Canadians must be!

I wanted to work and after searching work advertisements, I discovered that there was an opening in a school for children with disabilities. This interested me, so after an adventure wading in snow up to my waist I arrived at the school. (The woman at the subway stop said the school was just over the hill so instead of continuing around the hill on the subway, I got off and tried to walk over the hill on private land.  After being chased by dogs and wondering if it was possible to drown in the snow, I arrived but I am sure I looked very sorry.)

The authorities of the school were very friendly and gave me a tour.  However, when I asked about working, I was reminded how naïve I was.  The vice-principal told me I was eligible to be a teacher at the school but only if I had an Alberta teaching license. Since I could not work at the school I decided to do volunteer work and my experience there revealed how kind Canadians are to children with disabilities.

Canadians are the kindest culture I have seen to children who have disabilities. True, it was only one school in one province and I only volunteered for a couple of months but it was such a kind atmosphere; kindness for the different levels of disabled children, kindness in giving them and their parents real respect (not pity) and in trying to give the children a chance to learn up to their potential, and the kindness shown in the quality of the facility and the investment that Canadians make in children who have limited chance to return interest on the investment. Though the characteristics of the students were different than in other schools, the staff, teachers, and administrators were just as serious and just as committed as schools for other children.  Even their language was respectful.  There was no use of terms like retarded or even crippling.  It was a learning place where even the weakest were respected and loved and it was a place that beat with sounds of a kind Canadian heart.

I did not know it then but Canadian kindness to disabled children is only one of the ways that Canada is kind.  I have later discovered their kindness toward the “exile,” their kindness toward other cultures, and even their kindness toward those who blame Canada for their own misery.

I will continue to talk about these kindnesses as well as other things that I see in Canada in my next articles.

Cheers,

Joy

Shea Butter Market

In Writing (all kinds) on July 28, 2017 at 10:35 AM
Can’t See This Message? View in a browser
JULY 2017SHEA BUTTER MARKET NEWSLETTER 

This is the divider 

This is the divider 

WELCOME !

to the launch of our

MONTHLY NEWSLETTER

It is my joy and passion to share
this wonderful gift of Shea Butter
with all of you.

 

We look forward to regularly updating our website & offering promotions & sales offers to our Shea Butter Market friends & supporters.

 

Gifty Serbeh-Dunn

(Shea Butter Market Founder)

ABOUT GIFTY>>
This is the divider 

This is the divider 

ONLINE STOREWIDE SALE – 2 WEEKS ONLY!
40% OFF
OUR ENTIRE ONLINE STORE!

 

Yes friends, you read correctly!

On now till July 31, 2017

Our entire line of Shea Butter Marketproducts are on sale and waiting for you to enjoy or gift to someone special in your life.

USE SBM40 COUPON CODE

ONCE YOUR PURCHASE IS COMPLETE FOR YOUR 40% SAVINGS!

SHOP NOW >>
This is the divider 

This is the divider 

Shea Butter Market now offers gorgeous GIFT BASKETS!
Choose from any of our 3 collections:

 

BATH BLISS: Relax in Luxury

BEAUTIFUL BODY: Treat your Body

FACE SO PURE: Nature’s Shea Gift

All gift baskets come with a complimentary 100% pure hibiscus tea blend, and a 20% off coupon towards your next purchase!

All beautifully nestled in a delightful handmade basket direct from Ghana.

The perfect gift for you, or someone you want to treat with a special Shea Gift.

USE SBM40 COUPON CODE

ONCE YOUR PURCHASE IS COMPLETE FOR YOUR 40% SAVINGS!

VIEW OUR LUXURIOUS GIFT BASKETS ON SALE NOW!>>
This is the divider 

This is the divider 

USE COUPON CODE SBM40 FOR YOUR 40% SAVINGS!
This is the divider 

This is the divider 

READ MORE OF OUR SHEA BUTTER MARKET STORY>>
This is the divider 

This is the divider 

WE HOPE YOU’VE ENJOYED A SAMPLING OF WHAT’S IN STORE WITH OUR
SHEA BUTTER MARKET NEWSLETTER

Visit our website at SHEABUTTERMARKET.COM
for full details, the latest updates and more!

Subscribe here 

This is the divider 

This is the divider 

This is the footer

Toronto African Film & Music Festival

In Writing (all kinds) on July 1, 2017 at 5:07 PM

The Toronto African Film & Music Festival will be taking place from August 24, 2017, to August 26, 2017, at the Kingsway Community Life Centre at 186 Spadina Avenue. The opening film is an Egyptian film which is celebrating 100 years this year. The festival is looking for sponsorship. When you sponsor $250.00 CAD or more, you will receive five free passes to attend the festival which is savings of 60% on your sponsorship donation. Come celebrate the films, music, and fashion of African continent and all the diversity of Africa.

For more information, here is the website: http://torontoafricanfilmmusicfest.com/

For more information on how to become a sponsor, please contact me, Donna Kakonge, Festival Director at donna@torontoafricanfilmmusicfest.com

 

With this Ring Movie Event in Montréal, Canada

In Writing (all kinds) on April 3, 2017 at 11:55 AM
Ameesha Joshi invited you to With This Ring‘s event
With This Ring | Montreal Premiere
Monday, April 3 at 7 PM
Concordia University – Hall Building in Montreal, Quebec
Going
Interested
Not Interested
Back to where it all began! We’re thrilled to be finally showing our film in Montreal AND at Concordia University. We first met while studying at Concordia’s Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema and starte…

Change of Address for A Different Booklist in Toronto, ON, Canada

In Writing (all kinds) on March 22, 2017 at 12:17 PM

CHANGE OF ADDRESS

Greetings to all our suppliers,

This is to inform you that A Different Booklist has now relocated to a new address:

A Different Booklist

779 Bathurst Street

Toronto, ON

M5S 0B7

Our previous change of address notice had the wrong postal code. Please note the correct postal code above.

Please also update the following information:

Tel: 416 538 0889

Fax: 416 901 1662

Email: info@adifferentbooklist.com

Website: http://www.adifferentbooklist.com

All orders not yet shipped should be shipped to the new location at 779 Bathurst St.

Best Regards,

Miguel San Vicente

A Different Booklist

Have Fun in the Snow

In Entertainment, Living, Writing (all kinds) on March 23, 2015 at 3:00 AM

It’s here, so you might as well enjoy it. It’s snow, and if plenty has fallen in your area, there are many ways you can make of the most of it.

Read the rest of this entry »

Minister Fantino Names Major-General (R) Richard Rohmer as D-Day Special Advisor

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on October 17, 2013 at 3:39 PM

OTTAWA, Oct. 17, 2013 /CNW/ – The Honourable Julian Fantino, Minister of Veterans Affairs, today named Major-General (R) Richard Rohmer as his special advisor on D-Day commemorative events as the Government of Canadaprepares for the upcoming 70th anniversary of D-Day and the Battle of Normandy on June 6, 2014.

“I am delighted that such a distinguished Veteran is sharing his experience and providing his input to the commemorative activities for D-Day, which many consider was the beginning of the end of the Second World War,” said Minister Fantino. “His incredible personal experience and expertise will help to ensure that Canada’s Veterans will be recognized and remembered on such an important anniversary.” Read the rest of this entry »

Minister Kenney urges employers to find skilled workers at home

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on October 17, 2013 at 3:35 PM

CALGARY, Oct. 17, 2013 /CNW/ – In a keynote speech today at the very first Skilled Migration National Employer Conference, the Honourable Jason Kenney, Minister of Employment and Social Development and Minister for Multiculturalism, emphasized the importance of addressing skills shortages to support economic growth and long-term prosperity in Canada. Read the rest of this entry »

New Northern Ontario Hydroelectric Project Creating Jobs‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on August 15, 2013 at 3:00 AM
Ontario Newsroom Ontario Newsroom
News Release

New Northern Ontario Hydroelectric Project Creating Jobs

August 6, 2013

Province Building Long-Term Equity Partnership with First Nations

Ontario is creating up to 100 new construction jobs in Northern Ontario while renewing its commitment to clean, renewable electricity with the New Post Creek hydroelectric project.

Ontario Power Generation (OPG) and its partner, Coral Rapids Power, a wholly owned company of the Taykwa Tagamou Nation (TTN), are moving forward to develop approximately 25 megawatts (MW) of renewable hydroelectric power through the construction of a generating station on New Post Creek near its outlet to the Abitibi River.

The New Post Creek project builds on the expertise and capacity developed in recent Northern Ontario hydroelectric projects, such as the Lower Mattagami project. The new project will include construction of a generating station, a dam and powerhouse. Associated activities will include improvements to existing access roads, establishment of a construction site and installation of a transmission line.

This project supports Ontario’s goal to facilitate the participation of First Nation and Métis communities in renewable energy and transmission projects while building strong communities, powered by clean, reliable energy.

QUICK FACTS

  • Construction of the New Post Creek generating station will begin in 2014 and is expected to be in service by 2017.
  • Construction of the Lower Mattagami project started in 2010 and will add about 440 MW of clean electricity generating capacity to Ontario’s energy grid, while providing $2.6 billion of investment in the North.
  • OPG operates 13 generating stations in Northeastern Ontario with a capacity of over 1,000 MW of clean, renewable hydroelectric power. Altogether, Ontario has nearly 8,200 MW of installed waterpower.
  • Over the past 10 years, Ontario has brought more than 3,300 MW of renewable energy online — enough to power 900,000 homes each year.
  • Ontario is committed to working with Aboriginal partners to ensure they are able to benefit from and participate in resource development opportunities across the province.

LEARN MORE

QUOTES

“Hydroelectric power has long been a central pillar in the government’s renewable electricity portfolio and will continue to play a crucial role in our energy mix. This partnership also offers a natural transition for the First Nations workforce in the region as they continue to develop expertise in hydro development in the province.”
— Bob Chiarelli, Minister of Energy
“OPG is proud of the commercial partnership we have built with TTN and other Ontario First Nations. We are one step closer to seeing our partnership create substantial benefits for TTN’s community and this region, including education and training, jobs, economic investment and an additional 25 MW of clean, renewable hydropower”
— Tom Mitchell , President and CEO, Ontario Power Generation
“This important partnership between Coral Rapids Power & Ontario Power Generation will provide Taykwa Tagamou Nation with a long-term investment opportunity for a sustainable economic base for the community. We look forward to working with the Ministry of Energy & OPG on the New Post Creek Project, which will also provide benefits to the surrounding municipalities with economic development opportunities and creating employment.”
— Chief Linda Job, Taykwa Tagamou Nation

CONTACTS

Beckie Codd-Downey
Minister’s Office
416-325-2690
beckie.codd-downey@ontario.ca

Kirby Dier
Communications Branch
416-326-4542
kirby.dier@ontario.ca

Ministry of Energy
http://www.ontario.ca/energy

 


 

Questions about your subscription? Contact us. 
Edit your subscription preferences. 
Unsubscribe from News on Demand. 
 Follow Us On Twitter.
Visit the Newsroom.

© Queen’s Printer for Ontario, 2008 – 2013

Edleun Announces change to Board and Management Team

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on January 29, 2013 at 3:00 AM

CALGARY, Jan. 4, 2013 /CNW/ – Edleun Group, Inc. (“Edleun” or the “Company“) (TSXV: EDU), the leading provider of quality early childhood education and care in Canada, today announced that Mr. Leslie Wulf has resigned from his role as Vice Chairman and as a director of the Company, effective immediately, to pursue other opportunities. Read the rest of this entry »

Zipcar Launches Membership Offer with No Annual Fee

In cars, Writing (all kinds) on January 25, 2013 at 3:00 AM

Zero Membership Fee ‘Access Plan’ Starts in Canada

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Jan. 4, 2013 /CNW/ – Zipcar, Inc. (Nasdaq: ZIP), the world’s leading car sharing network, today announced a new weekday, no annual fee driving program called the ‘Access Plan,’ which will be introduced as a pilot program in Toronto and Vancouver, Canada. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC invites Canadians to comment on northern telecommunications services

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Sports, Technology, travel, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on December 11, 2012 at 3:00 AM
OTTAWA-GATINEAU, December 6, 2012 — Today, the Canadian Radio-television
and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) launched a public consultation on
the telecommunications services that Northwestel provides to northern
Canadians. Following this consultation, a public hearing will be held on
June 17, 2013, in Inuvik, Northwest Territories and June 19, 2013, in
Whitehorse, Yukon. Read the rest of this entry »

Diverse women of the North (Originally Published with Amöi Magazine)

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Health, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, travel, Writing (all kinds) on February 8, 2012 at 3:00 AM

Yellowknife is a well-kept Canadian secret.

Kate Wilson who is the Director of Family Housing for the YWCA in Yellowknife is from Ghana. She is a teacher by profession, trained in Ghana. Wilson did adult education at Aurora College in Yellowknife, as well as taking career development and life skills coaching through the YWCA. She’s been living in the city for 12 years with her husband, who is an electrical engineer, and their four children. Wilson currently finds housing for people who are temporarily homeless. Read the rest of this entry »

Measha Brueggergosman Asks Canadians to Take Care of Their Hearts for the Ones They Love

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Sports, Technology, travel, Writing (all kinds) on January 20, 2012 at 3:00 AM

Internationally-acclaimed Canadian soprano shares her heart health wake-up call and helps Becel®, founding sponsor of The Heart and Stroke Foundation’s The Heart Truth™ campaign, raise awareness of women’s heart health Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC releases 2010 financial results for Canadian television services‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Sports, Technology, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on June 7, 2011 at 3:00 AM

CRTC Has Made Decisions, Including Affecting the CBC - Photo Courtesy of Google Images

CRTC releases 2010 financial results for Canadian television services

OTTAWA-GATINEAU, June 2, 2011 —The Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) today released statistical and
financial information on Canadian television showing increased profits for
all services for the broadcast year ending August 31, 2010. The data
includes information from conventional television stations and specialty,
pay and pay-per-view television services, as well as video-on-demand
services (pay and specialty services). Read the rest of this entry »

Quebec: a case of cultural and linguistic imperialism?

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Sports, Technology, travel, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on September 9, 2010 at 3:00 AM

Gaetan Tremblay’s essay poses the question – “is Quebec culture doomed to become American?” He answers that there is a real threat of cultural invasion. But, the situation is not that bad, he writes, at least in the early 1990s when the article came out. Read the rest of this entry »

Walking to Change

In Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Religion, travel, Writing (all kinds) on July 18, 2010 at 5:00 AM

Jennifer Winters Writes About Racism - Photo Courtesy of Jennifer Winters

Written by: Jennifer Winters

Every face has a story, does it matter what colour it is? Unfortunately no matter how many boundaries and walls that have been broken it seems that prejudice is still in the air and people that are a minority still get treated poorly. A few years ago I traveled to a small town called Tennant Creek in Australia, where I was the minority for this first time. A town of approximately 3,500 people and mostly of aboriginal descent and having a bus load of 20 ignorant middle class travelers not having a clue on how they live their lives. We were there for only one night and we had lasted about 5 minutes in the only bar they had. Read the rest of this entry »

Olympic Spirit

In Beauty, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Sports, travel, Writing (all kinds) on March 24, 2010 at 7:45 AM

Sarah Moore Writes about Olympic Purchases - Photo Courtesy of Dreamstime.com

By Sarah Moore

Although the Olympics are over, many Canadian companies are continuing to sell Olympic-related paraphernalia in an attempt to stretch out the Olympic spirit, and keep one hand in the Canadian consumer’s pocket. Read the rest of this entry »

Olympic coverage

In Beauty, Business, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Sports, Technology, travel, Writing (all kinds) on March 3, 2010 at 9:08 PM

Patrycja Klucznik Writes about the Olympic Coverage - Photo Courtesy of Dreamstime.com

Patrycja Klucznik
Feb. 23, 2010

Lack of Olympic coverage is glaring by our neighbours to the south. Not only are the major cable networks like CNN and NBC lacking in their coverage of the Vancouver Games, but even places like Detroit are about to be out of the loop. Read the rest of this entry »

TOK Writing Series

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Writing (all kinds) on January 4, 2010 at 7:18 AM

As a professor, I was fortunate to receive the TOK reading series, issued by the University of Toronto. The TOK series is a collection of three books, all of them anthologies. Read the rest of this entry »

Ride Again Tomorrow

In cars, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Opinion, Writing (all kinds) on January 3, 2010 at 3:59 PM

Kirk Verner Writes about a Car Accident in Saskatchewan - Photo Courtesy of Dreamstime.com

By Kirk Verner

I was saddened to hear of a horrifying, fatal accident that took place in rural Saskatchewan, my hometown, over the holiday season. By the way people drive on the blustery Saskatchewan highways you’d think this was certainly where a fatal accident would ultimately occur in late December, but nasty road conditions or invincible 4X4 drivers were not to blame. This lethal catastrophe occurred on a snow-mobile, a ski-doo. Hearing of this terrible occurrence brought two thoughts to my mind. The first thing I thought of was the uncontrollable power these modern day snow-eating machines come equipped with. Read the rest of this entry »

Bob Phillips: Canadian

In Business, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Music, Opinion, Technology, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on September 3, 2009 at 7:54 AM

Bob Phillips was the editor of a bilingual newspaper in Aylmer, Quebec. This tells of his story as a sensitive man who tried to bridge the gap between two language communities in the place where he lived:

Error
This video doesn’t exist

%d bloggers like this: