Posts Tagged With: books

Get 20% Off On Lulu.com


At: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/kakonged get 20% off with two codes:

GLOW until June 7, 2013

And,

JUNEBOOKS13 all month

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Meet The Author at Accents on Eglinton Bookstore Every Sunday Afternoon from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.


Photo by Alice Romo

Photo by Alice Romo

What: Donna Kakonge How To Talk To Crazy People. All of her 45 books on sale.

Where: 1790 Eglinton Ave. West @ Dufferin in Toronto…meter parking in front of street, Green P parking lot close to Maria Shukra library across the street, gas station across the street in southwest corner, Tim Hortons to the south, bookstore – Accents in the northwest corner of Dufferin and Eglinton in relation to Yonge Street…restaurants and clothing stores close by, plus banks, 32 Eglinton West bus stop close by and 29 Dufferin bus minutes walk away

When: Every Sunday from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., meet the author. 

How: Abubacar Fofana who owns the store rocks! Everyone who enters the place rocks!

Why: The book is bloody good and that is the truth Ruth! Everyone tells Donna and everyone else! They are not even lying 🙂 LOL!

ALSO MEET THE AUTHOR EVERY SUNDAY FROM 3:00 P.M. TO 5:00 P.M. STARTING  APRIL 14, 2013 FROM 3:00 P.M. TO 5:00 P.M. – SAME LOCATION – MY BOOKS WILL BE THERE TOO WITH NEW COVER

Contact: 647-352-8558

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Sales on Donna Kakonge`s Books Through Lulu.com


At: http://lulu.com/spotlight/kakonged

Get 20% off with code APRILBOOKS13

Get 15% off with code WELCOME for first time buyers

Get 15% off with code POURING until April 19, 2013

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Free Ground Shipping at http://lulu.com/spotlight/kakonged


No Code Required

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Donna Kakonge on “Liquid Lunch” With ThatChannel.com + Books Now in Kobo Store


http://www.kobobooks.com/search/search.html?q=How+To+Talk+To+Crazy+People

http://www.kobobooks.com/ebook/How-To-Write-Creative-Non/book-ljZekxD3k0yMdDtSo2mvJA/page1.html

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Get 20% Off How To Talk To Crazy People And The New How To Write Creative Non-fiction


Enter code FEBBOOKS13 @ http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/kakonged

Look on www.donnakakonge.com to select your book/s!

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Hobbies By Marcia Casar Friedman


For years, I heard co-workers, friends and family wish it was time for them to retire. I started to work in my parent’s retail clothing store at the age of eight, then never stopped working. I didn’t know any other life, except to work. Planning for retirement did not exist. I expected to work the rest of my life. Continue reading

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Enoch Press Highlights Importance of Self-Publishing Industry in Author Success


Enoch Press, an emerging publishing house based in Baltimore, MD, identifies important trends to author success via the increasingly powerful self-publishing industry. Zsolt Bicskey, publisher-in-chief comments on this development and his company’s role in the achievement of new authors.

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self-publihsing

positive self-publihsing

Quote startI am proud to be a part of this industry and am pleased to have the opportunity to give a voice to would-be writers who were simply sitting on manuscripts that the reading public has a right to have access to.Quote end Continue reading
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Donna Kakonge’s Books in Your Library


Hello Librarian:

Please consider purchasing the following books for your library:

1. Title: Young Black Women in Toronto High Schools: Portraits of Family, School and Community Involvement in Determining Goals and Career Aspirations

Author: Dr. Donna Kay Cindy Kakonge, ABD

Publisher: Donna Kay Kakonge, M.A.

ISBN: 9781926734408

Price: $99.99

Acquisition: Please purchase the book through Lulu.com.

Summary of Contents: This book is qualitative narrative case studies concerning the career aspirations of young Black females.

Qualifications: Donna Kakonge is an author of 61 books currently in nine libraries and sold online and in bookstores, teacher, PhD Candidate at the University of Toronto, and a law student living in Toronto. She spends her free time reading, writing, playing the piano, grooming as any Leo should and spending time with friends and family. This book is a follow up to the successful How To Talk To Crazy People published in 2012 by Donna. Her website is Donnakakonge.com.

Review: Donna Magazine. (2 February 2014). “Donna Magazine,” in Donna Magazine.
Donna Magazine. (10 February 2014). “Buy Donna Kakonge’s Books on Lulu.com,” in Donna Magazine. [Video]. ThatChannel.com. Continue reading
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Three Quarters Available, How to Write Creative Non-fiction and How To Talk To Crazy People all by Donna Kakonge Available at the Toronto Public Library


Three Quarters by Donna Kakonge:

http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/detail.jsp?Entt=RDM3048262&R=3048262

How to Write Creative Non-fiction by Donna Kakonge:

http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/detail.jsp?Entt=RDM3048261&R=3048261

and

How To Talk To Crazy People by Donna Kakonge:

http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/detail.jsp?Entt=RDM2979553&R=2979553

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Donna Kakonge on “Liquid Lunch” with ThatChannel.com


Donna Kakonge on “Liquid Lunch” with ThatChannel.com

Donna Kakonge on “Liquid Lunch” with ThatChannel.com

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How To Talk To Crazy People and More On Sale Now


You can buy this great book at: www.lulu.com/spotlight/kakonged?searchTerms=How+To+Talk+To+Crazy+People

Also Available on Amazon Kindle

 

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Free Shipping to Canada & No Minimum Purchase‏ – AbeBooks.com


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We’ve been making booklovers happy for years. Find your next book and skip the shipping costs to Canada. No minimum purchase. Just choose the “Search Free Shipping to Canada” button.

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How To Talk To Crazy People and More On Sale – Your Personal Numerology Report With Purchase


Get How To Talk To Crazy People and more on sale at:

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/kakonged?searchTerms=How+To+Talk+To+Crazy+People

Use the code AMPLIUS or JANBOOKS13

Send me an email at: dkakonge@sympatico.ca with proof of purchase, the name on your birth certificate and your date of birth and I will generate a more than 200-page Hans Decoz numerology report for you.

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Boxing Day


http://www.donnakakonge.com/work/dwork.html

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Last Day To Get How To Talk To Crazy People Before the 24th – ENTER CODE FELICITAS


emailheader_120512_ENUK_FELICITAS

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How To Talk To Crazy People Available


13432861_cover

Buy How To Talk To Crazy People before the 14th at: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/kakonged?searchTerms=How+To+Talk+To+Crazy+People

Get it before Christmas, write it off on your taxes and enjoy the book!

Enter codes FELICITAS or DECBOOKS12 – verified site!!!

13442284_cover – hardcover

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Flower Press publishes revolution: poetry by MaryAnn Hayatian‏


 

 

Revolution is about poetry, defining aspects that require correction in the humanity. We are who we are, no one can tell us to be who we are not. People who have received the opportunity of variety. Let them learn that what they bring with them of a stale theory will not continue in a world that is taught to adjust because we have the liberty.
to buy a copy email at info@flowerpress.ca
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This week at Accents Bookstore: The Book of Negroes+ Poetry+La Peña de Rosy+ Nadijah Robinson Art Show (September 27/2012-September30/2012)‏


This week at Accents on Eglinton BOOKSTORE

September 27/2012-September 30/2012

1790 Eglinton Ave. W. (at Dufferin), phone: 647-352-8558

 

 

 

Thursday, September 27/2012

READING BLACK CANADA presents a discussion of Lawrence Hill’s 

“THE BOOK OF NEGROES” 

Organizer: Spotlighting and Promoting African Canadian Experiences (S.P.A.C.E Network) Continue reading

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“Steel Wool on a Stick”- book review by: Kirk Verner


Kirk Verner Writes about Steel Wool on a Stick – Photo Courtesy of Livejournal.com

Image result for Steel Wool on a stick by Jeff Block

By Kirk Verner

Copious amounts of marijuana, fistfuls of Prozac, sleeping in cars, and a pedal bike; you’d think this was a story of a down-and-out Tour de France hopeful, but the case could not be further from reality. Nor is it a story of a self-pity blown degenerate waiting for life’s hand-outs to come within grasping distance. This is a story of one man’s quest to find out what he wants to be when he grows up; a task often more difficult than one thinks, and Jeff Block ‘s testimony is sure to lay claim to this statement.

“Son, you get one chance in life to be born into wealth and you blew it!” –Dad

This single quote, which commences the book, sets the reader up for what is expected to be an off-the-wall, witty reflection of a journey to the soup line; but, that is not what is contained in this 191-page paperback. Instead, Jeff Block takes his readers on a path of hardship, failure, and disappointment. There is nothing humourous about suicidal thoughts, and this is just one of the hardships faced by a man with a university degree, a daughter, and a heap of debt the size of a year’s harvest of roses pilled and burnt in Times Square.

From a floor trader in Chicago’s financial district to driving a limousine, to menial desk jobs, all the way to whirling seemingly pointless cocktail napkin roses in bars, Jeff Block can honestly say he has been there and done that. Searching, seeking, scouring for that perfect job is not a course that comes equipped with a user manual, but with the author’s “I refuse to work for anyone again,” attitude and a bounty of ambition the perfect job came to him, turning out to be a hobby he claims to have put on steroids.

“Steel Wool on a Stick” is a loose handbook for self-starters, entrepreneurs, or anyone dying to have a career where they can honestly say, “I love my job.” Unlike many, Jeff Block has found his calling, his niche, his “dream job”.

JUSTPAPERROSES.COM is his company and also the premise of the book. An Internet-based company created by a passion, Jeff Block is now making a healthy living, working from home, doing what he loves. His attitude, “If I can do it, you can do it,” is not original, and the contents of these pages are not a step-by-step instruction booklet on how to become rich and famous; it is a story of persistence, dedication to one’s passions, and the will to never give up.

“Life is like a roll of toilet paper. The closer you get to the end, the faster it goes.” This true-life quote closes the book and opens the eyes of anyone who reads it. Do you one day want a Corvette in your garage?

Kirk Verner
March 29, 2010

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Book Review: Mikaya Heart’s My Sweet Wild Dance


Rachel Muenz Does a Review of Mikaya Heart\’s My Sweet Dance – Photo Courtesy of Dreamstime.com

Image result for Mikaya Heart My Sweet Wild Dance

By Rachel Muenz

Mikaya Heart’s My Sweet Wild Dance is not an artistic masterpiece, nor is it meant to be. It is, however, a clear, well-written and honest coming of age story that most readers should find interesting at the very least.

Based on Heart’s own life, the book follows the main character Christine as she grows from a confused, frustrated child in Scotland, to a young angry teen and finally, to a spiritually calm middle-aged woman living in California. Through this journey, Christine overcomes gender and class stereotypes, the demands of her parents, childhood sexual abuse and her own negativity by discovering her sexual identity as a lesbian and through travel and spiritualism.

The story begins with something of a warning that though it is a “true story,” it is only Heart’s version of the truth. She says the book is not meant to have a moral but to show Christine’s path through the difficulties of life and to inspire and entertain others. Overall, My Sweet Wild Dance succeeds in that goal.

After the preface, a prologue and the first chapter introduce us to Christine as a self-confident adult before leading into a mostly chronological account of her life from about age five to her 50s. The first half of the book is set in the U.K. and the second half covers Christine’s life in the U.S.

Told in short chapters broken into smaller sections, the book is easy to get through and should appeal to those who like their reading material in small doses. However, the fragmented structure can sometimes be a bit disorienting. There are times, especially in the latter half of the book, where some sections in a chapter don’t quite relate to each other or flow as nicely as they could. The structure isn’t a disaster but some readers may find it too choppy for their liking.

Also, some scenes don’t seem necessary to advance the plot while others leave us wishing Heart had stayed with them longer and fleshed them out a bit more. A good example of one of these beautiful scenes is the stream Christine plays in as a child. Here, Christine learns “what will feel solid when [she] touch[es] it and what (such as the weeds or the illusory water itself) will disappear between [her] fingers like air.” This scene mirrors the contrast of how polite the adult world is supposed to be with how harmful it is to Christine in reality, a major theme in this part of the book.

Yet, often, we don’t get as strong a sense of the people and places in the book as we would like because these scenes begin and end suddenly. Characters and places flash into Christine’s life like sparks and disappear just as quickly. But, as the preface states, the book is about Christine working through and exploring her feelings rather than bringing settings and characters to life. It is Christine’s bravery and gutsiness in facing great difficulty that keeps us reading in spite of her flaws.

Throughout the book, Christine refuses to give in.

She battles through the effects of her father’s bullying to finally stop submitting to men and avoids conforming to her mother’s idea of an upper-class Scottish lady by becoming a hippy, political activist and, later, an agricultural mechanic and kiteboarder. Lastly, she overcomes the grief and anger of her experience with sexually abusive men through a heightened spiritual awareness and through her world travels, the beauty of nature and the love she finds with women.

Heart, like Christine, also shows courage in her use of language in the book.

For the most part, the language is plain and uncensored though it tends to be almost raving during Christine’s spiritual and sexual experiences, matching the emotional intensity of these events. Heart leaves nothing back in describing Christine’s sexual relationships and the sexual abuse she suffers as a child. As a result, the first half of the book and the flashbacks in the second are tough to get through because of the number of upsetting abuse scenes. However, the book is also filled with plenty of humour to lighten things up and Christine’s eventual triumph over this abuse makes up for the pain.

Finally, though readers may also find parts of the book repetitive – Christine’s constant cycle of falling in love with new women and then losing interest is one example – the spiritual growth and power Christine attains is just too interesting to pay much heed to the book’s few problems. As Christine says near the end of the book, “From the perspective of All-that-is, things aren’t so serious. Often they are simply experiences.” Ultimately, My Sweet Wild Dance is a record of both simple and extraordinary spiritual experiences that should leave all but the most cynical of readers uplifted.

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J. Burrage Publications, LLC Announces a New Service for Aspiring Self-Publishing Authors


. Burrage Publications, LLC, a 21st Century publisher of powerful novels such as Caught Up and My Red Hijab, My White Baby Tee, and My Blue Skinny Jeans, has announced services for authors wishing to self-publish.
J. Burrage Publications, LLC Announces a New Service for Aspiring Self-Publishing Authors

Mesilla Park, NM, November 21, 2011 –(PR.com)– J. Burrage Publications, LLC understands how difficult it can be for authors to find the right publisher. For this reason, and because JBP doesn’t want to discourage authors who may receive notification that they will not be published by the publishing house, JBP has announced services for authors wishing to self-publish. JBP’s self-publishing services are available to any author who chooses to self-publish, regardless of genre.

JBP’s services include:
· Proofreading
· Editing (light substantive and substantive)
· E-book conversion
· Cover design
· Book interior design

Services do not include:
· Copyright Registration
· Library of Congress Control Number (LCCN) Registration
· ISBNs
· Marketing Services (Possibly coming soon.)
· Book Printing and Distribution

All interested authors can find more information about these services, including how to schedule consultations, at www.jbpublications.com. Consultations are free.

JBP is a new publishing house that began accepting new authors in 2011, and their goal of “taking over the industry, one book at a time” is very apparent. While the company might be new, they have published several critically-acclaimed novels, including a street thriller titled Caught Up, the emotionally-charged novella Padre, and My Red Hijab, My White Baby Tee, and My Blue Skinny Jeans. One factor that sets JBP apart from other publishers is their mission – to find unknown writers with powerful, compelling stories to tell and build their reputations.

The “3-B Dimension” experience is another innovative development by J. Burrage Publications. This is an entirely new reading experience, designed to hook readers and leave them wanting more—creating the most unique experience the readers have ever known. Lesser-known writers, undiscovered talents, and new authors will help build the 3-B Dimension through compelling stories, unlike anything readers have read previously, creating a synergistic platform for all authors published through JBP.

To find out more about J. Burrage Publications, LLC and their authors and books, visit them online at www.jbpublications.com. You can also follow JBP on Twitter and Facebook.

About J. Burrage Publications, LLC: Founded by author JB Burrage in 2007, J. Burrage Publications, LLC has seen significant growth and opened their doors to new, unknown authors with captivating tales to weave. JBP is a company on a mission to take advantage of e-publishing and internet technology to bring readers the best novels and the most unique reading experiences possible. Unlike most major publishers, JBP has embraced the e-publishing revolution and offers eBooks as well as printed books through an immense array of online retailers.

###

Contact Information
J. Burrage Publications, LLC
Jacob L. Burrage
(800) 940-5604
Contact
http://www.jbpublications.com
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iUniverse Author Elaine Cooper wins award at LA Book festival


Image result for iUniverse

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Why do We Celebrate Easter? Kid’s Book Free on Kindle in 2012


Image result for Easter

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How to buy food cheap (orginally published on The Shoestring.com)


Image result for Cheap food

How to Buy Food Cheap

Food, as you all know, is something that we need to survive. Whether you eat too much, too little or the right amount for your body type, here are some tips on how to cut down on your grocery expenses without starving.

If you are on a really tight budget, food banks are a great way to get free food. Some people volunteer there to stock on groceries. This could definitely be a great way to meet some interesting people with fascinating life stories as well. One new friend of mine named Greg who I met on my way to meet an old friend Simone, told me about his experience volunteering at a food bank not too far away from where we both live. He said that the people he met there were great and he also got a lot of free food.

Speaking of free food, Greg is a cook and gets a lot of free stuff from the restaurant he works at. If you are looking for a job and need to make ends meet, looking for something in the food industry may be a good way to earn an honest living and stock those empty shelves in your kitchen.

Also, a lot of restaurants and grocery stores throw away food at the end of the night. The Loblaws, close to where I live, have their sandwiches with healthy stuff in it like tuna, egg, cold meats and different kind of cheeses that are half price at the closing time. You can get a $4 CDN sandwich for half the price and have all your meals set for the day.

If you are like me and you are a breakfast person who enjoys eggs, bacon and some home fries – check out governmental cafeterias. They often have food at discount prices that do not compare to the food you will find in other restaurants for the same price. Remember, it is public property.

For dining out, there is always the failsafe “all you can eat buffet.” If you allow yourself to starve enough in the morning and go at a time when you know you will not need to eat again for the day, you can visit one of these places (the ones in Chinatown and Indian villages are especially good). Actually, you cannot go wrong checking out the food of the world wherever you may be located.

Now for the traditional grocery shopping – flyers and coupons are your friends. Plus, if you can stand the attitude at times (with the exception of local grocers) try going to places where you can bring your own bags or they may provide boxes for you to take your stuff. I was with a girlfriend Joan of mine and we saw a man riding his bike carrying another bicycle. If that could be done, imagine the strength you could build up carrying your groceries with your bike.

If you are blessed to have a car, you need to work out if it is worth it to drive to a supermarket with great deals, or just walk to the nearest one and save on gas. Let us hope the exercise will not kill you.

You can also take advantage of the fact the weather is still good and enjoy an old-fashioned farmer’s market. If you avoid the ones in the ritzy neighbourhoods, you can get great deals on everything from jams to corn. Sometimes these farmer’s markets have such amazing deals that it’s worth it to take your car, or rent one, to get out of town and do some shopping in a place a bit out of the way.

One of my fondest memories growing up was my Dad taking me and my siblings out to do apple-picking outside of Toronto. They say apples keep the doctors away, so stock up. It would be hard to live on apples alone, but at many of the orchards, you can get a number of fruits dirt cheap and in large quantities.

If you are ever really starving and there is just nothing in the fridge and in the cupboards, there is a Chinese proverb that says “one can go without eating for many days, but needs green tea.” Mind you I received this proverb from my friend Steve and I do not know about its scientific basis. I would advise you not to try this at home, but green tea (which you can find inexpensively in China Town) is a great way to suppress your appetite, thus keeping your food costs down.

If you have a large family, buying in bulk is always an option. Places like Costco can be a good way to support an army. If you just basically need to support yourself, good advice I got from my friend Joan was to not stock on food. You can end up finding your shelves filled with things you will never eat. Buy what you need and then maybe the rest of the world will have more too.

I hope that helps since $100 can go pretty fast on food. I have seen it happen in the blink of an eye and not really understood what the woman in front of me in the grocery line was buying. Always check the prices of the food, remember flyers and coupons can be your friends if you are into that sort of thing and think cheap and be cheap.

Donna Kakonge is a freelance writer/communicator/professor in Toronto. Her books can be bought at http://stores.lulu.com/kakonged. She is working on another book she is hoping will be published in 2008.

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Tranquil Prisons: Chemical Incarceration Under Community Treatment Orders


Image result for Erick Fabris

Book release:

Tues Nov. 1, 2011, 7 pm, The Gladstone Hotel Gallery,
1214 Queen Street West @ Dufferin,
Toronto, Canada.

Featuring: Drs. Rachel Gorman and Geoffrey Reaume (Associate Professor in Critical Disability Studies, York University, Toronto, Canada), and, appearing on skype, Tina Minkowitz, Esq. (founder of the Center for the Human Rights of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry).

Free and wheelchair accessible.
See more reading dates: http://www.erickfabris.com/tp.html

About the book:

“A brave and innovative book, Tranquil Prisons is a rare academic study of psychiatric treatment written by a former mental patient. Erick Fabris’ original, multidisciplinary research demonstrates how clients are pre-emptively put on chemical agents despite the possibility of alternatives. Putting forth calls for professional accountability and more therapy choices for patients, Fabris’ narrative is both accessible and eye-opening.” – Erica Burman, Research Institute of Health and Social Change, Manchester Metropolitan University

Tranquil Prisons is a unique and accessible study of psychiatric treatments used as restraints. Medications assumed to be safe and effective are imposed on many patients who are neither violent nor resistant. A psychiatric drug intervention can be indefinitely prescribed through legal constraints like Ontario’s Community Treatment Orders. As choicely is healthy in any medical arrangement, the author calls for an abandonment of pre-emptive toxic bio-psychological interventions, which he argues to be cruel forms of restraint and detention. Fabris is himself a former psychiatric patient and his ethnographic narrative also describes patient resistance to contemporary psychiatric practices and theories.

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Lawrence Hill


Lawrence Hill, Review of BlackBerry, Sweet Juice

Image result for Blackberry, Sweet Juice Lawrence Hill

“The blacker the berry/The sweeter the juice/But if you get too black/It ain’t no use.”

Author Lawrence Hill says his father passed along this saying to him. In his memoir Black Berry, Sweet Juice, On Being Black and White in Canada, Hill tells the story of a young black and white man who developed his identity from two racial worlds in Canada. It’s a revealing tale of how his black father and white mother met, married and had three children. More importantly, it’s about how race has played a factor in his life:

Race becomes an issue as a result of environmental factors. The average white kid growing up in a totally white suburb doesn’t have to think of himself or herself as white. For a huge portion of my childhood, I was very much like that white kid. But gradually, as imperceptibly as the movement of the hour hand around the clock, my environment started talking to me and making me aware that I was different, that I could never truly be white. There’s nothing like being called “nigger” to let you know that you’re not white. It didn’t happen often. But it happened enough to awaken me.

Hill writes that growing up racially different in Don Mills wasn’t easy. However, he still was a privileged child who went to good schools, traveled to such places as Africa and dealt with his multicultural and multiracial extended family.

Lawrence Hill faced many difficulties, but his experience doesn’t seem any different from the life of many black people growing up in Canada. I will take myself as an example.

Hill talks about not knowing if you’re black. Until I was 5, I had no idea that I was black. And I thought my mother was white because she wasn’t the same colour as the rest of our family. Being from the Caribbean, she was lighter. My father is a dark-skinned African.

I grew up in a white suburb as Hill. I was privileged enough to learn French like Hill and travel to Africa.

Hill writes about having hair issues – I wrote my master’s thesis on that. If that’s not an indication of having an issue with my hair, I’m not sure what else could be.

Where the paths differ is that in a black and white existence, passing for white becomes an issue, where that has never been an option for me. Although Hill discusses in his book a passion for embracing his blackness and identifying as black, this becomes particularly fascinating for a man who could pass for white under an undiscerning eye.

I believe many black people could identify with Hill. So why are their story not told, and Hill’s is? There are so few black people published in Canada.

I am so grateful though that Hill mentions in his book since he does have the privilege to get published by Harper-Collins, that he recognizes race as a social construct more than a biological one:

“It’s necessary to probe into the social meanings of race. The book is my attempt to examine the issues of race. [The book is for] anyone who’s interested in examining the core of race and how it’s played out. My existence is the fighting against easy definitions of race.”

Hill’s writing style is similar to the way he speaks. It flows and it has a beat. It’s as easy to follow as an Amanda Marshall song. And it’s good that, as in Marshall’s song Everybody Has a Story, Hill tries to include the stories of other black and white people in his book. There are so many voices not heard. And he admits to this.

Perhaps Hill’s voice can become an echo for others. That would be sweet juice indeed.

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life rattle show no. 1174


http://www.liferattle.ca/radio/show1174.html

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Kindle Direct Publishing Now Enables Authors and Publishers to Independently Publish Their Books in the Amazon.fr Kindle Store


Image result for Amazon Kindle

Authors and publishers can now earn up to 70% royalty on sales to Kindle customers in France

LUXEMBOURG, Oct 07, 2011 (BUSINESS WIRE) —

(NASDAQ: AMZN)–Amazon.fr today announced that authors and publishers worldwide are now able to make their books available in the Amazon.fr Kindle Store (www.amazon.fr/kindle) using Kindle Direct Publishing (http://kdp.amazon.fr). Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) is a fast, free and easy way for authors and publishers to make their books available to Kindle customers worldwide via Kindle, on the web with Kindle Cloud Reader and on free Kindle reading apps for Android, iPad, iPhone, iPod touch, Windows Phone, PC, and Mac.

Authors and publishers can utilize the new KDP website to make their books available in France, Germany, the UK, US and more than 100 countries worldwide while continuing to own the rights to their books. The popular KDP 70% royalty option is also now available for books sold in France, and people can receive their payment in Euros, British pounds or US dollars. For more information and program terms, please visit http://kdp.amazon.fr.

“Authors and publishers can now reach more readers by using Kindle Direct Publishing to make their books available to French customers in the new Amazon.fr Kindle Store, as well as customers all over the world,” said Greg Greeley, vice president, European Retail. “Authors in many countries have already seen tremendous success with KDP, like American author John Locke who has sold more than 1 million Kindle books using KDP, and we’re happy to bring the program to French authors and publishers.”

The Amazon.fr Kindle Store, which also launched today, serves customers in France, Belgium, Monaco, Luxembourg, and Switzerland. The French Kindle Store offers customers a vast selection of over 35,000 French-language Kindle books, all 28 L’Express best sellers available in digital–the most in France–hundreds of popular graphic novels and over 4,000 free classics in French.

About Amazon.com

Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ: AMZN), a Fortune 500 company based in Seattle, opened on the World Wide Web in July 1995 and today offers Earth’s Biggest Selection. Amazon.com, Inc. seeks to be Earth’s most customer-centric company, where customers can find and discover anything they might want to buy online, and endeavors to offer its customers the lowest possible prices. Amazon.com and other sellers offer millions of unique new, refurbished and used items in categories such as Books; Movies, Music & Games; Digital Downloads; Electronics & Computers; Home & Garden; Toys, Kids & Baby; Grocery; Apparel, Shoes & Jewelry; Health & Beauty; Sports & Outdoors; and Tools, Auto & Industrial. Amazon Web Services provides Amazon’s developer customers with access to in-the-cloud infrastructure services based on Amazon’s own back-end technology platform, which developers can use to enable virtually any type of business. The new latest generation Kindle is the lightest, most compact Kindle ever and features the same 6-inch, most advanced electronic ink display that reads like real paper even in bright sunlight. Kindle Touch is a new addition to the Kindle family with an easy-to-use touch screen that makes it easier than ever to turn pages, search, shop, and take notes – still with all the benefits of the most advanced electronic ink display. Kindle Touch 3G is the top of the line e-reader and offers the same new design and features of Kindle Touch, with the unparalleled added convenience of free 3G. Kindle Fire is the Kindle for movies, TV shows, music, books, magazines, apps, games and web browsing with all the content, free storage in the Amazon Cloud, Whispersync, Amazon Silk (Amazon’s new revolutionary cloud-accelerated web browser), vibrant color touch screen, and powerful dual-core processor.

Amazon and its affiliates operate websites, including http://www.amazon.com, http://www.amazon.co.uk, http://www.amazon.de, http://www.amazon.co.jp, http://www.amazon.fr, http://www.amazon.ca, http://www.amazon.cn, http://www.amazon.it, and http://www.amazon.es. As used herein, “Amazon.com,” “we,” “our” and similar terms include Amazon.com, Inc., and its subsidiaries, unless the context indicates otherwise.

Forward-Looking Statements

This announcement contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Actual results may differ significantly from management’s expectations. These forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that include, among others, risks related to competition, management of growth, new products, services and technologies, potential fluctuations in operating results, international expansion, outcomes of legal proceedings and claims, fulfillment center optimization, seasonality, commercial agreements, acquisitions and strategic transactions, foreign exchange rates, system interruption, inventory, government regulation and taxation, payments and fraud. More information about factors that potentially could affect Amazon.com’s financial results is included in Amazon.com’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including its most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K and subsequent filings.

SOURCE: Amazon.com, Inc.

Amazon.com, Inc.
Media Hotline, 206-266-7180
http://www.amazon.com/pr

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New Donna’s Store


Check out Donna Kakonge’s new link on Lulu.com’s Authors Spotlight: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/kakonged.

Ugandan Travelogue

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Everybody is doing it! Aging is our universal full time job!


“Aging Is a Full-Time Job” by Marcia Casar Friedman, is a motivational book written for seniors’ ages 50+, with an emphasis on Silver Sages ages 65+. Marcia writes about feelings, self-esteem, aging, wishes, loneliness, endings, worrying, gratitude, family changes and more. With the goal of guiding readers to improve their lives, Marcia discovered writing is healing. Everyone can write! There are numerous “How to—” topics emphasized throughout the book, with directions to write privately in a journal, using a computer or talking into a tape recorder.

Even though the various subjects examined in the book can be faced at almost any age, seniors have a different point of view due to years of experience, in a much less technological world. Reviewing experiences by reading, thinking and writing, can help many people come to terms with the natural changes that come with aging.

Use the evaluating tools included in the book to recognize the inspirational new light that comes from the wisdom of aging. Endings are beginnings! Concentrate on today to create an improved, first-class life for today and tomorrow. Discover the answer to “Who am I?”

How can we acknowledge the good, the bad, and the ugly inherited from the past and still lead a balanced, successful life? Relive them! The last part of the book emphasizes family relationships and their effects. The past is done, it no longer exists. Learning never ends! Now is the time to make peace with your past so you don’t mess up the present!

Read excerpts, writing is healing and more at http://www.agingisafulltimejob.com

Author Biography

Ms. Friedman was a teacher for the Pittsburgh Public Schools, Los Angeles School District, and a Cal State University master student teacher.

Writing, sociology, and psychology have always been her passions. She conducted adult training programs in English as a Second Language, created “feelings workshops,” behavior modification classes and was a trainer for various businesses. Her enduring belief is that “learning never ends!”

Buy the book at your local bookstore or

http://www.agingisafulltimejob.com

Purchase the book between 7/11/11 and 11/11/11 to receive a free copy of “Yes you can get there from here”

E-mail the receipt to Marcia@agingisafulltimejob.com

to receive your Free offer.

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Marketing the Key to Self-Publishing


Image result for Self-Publishing

Sunday, September 27, 2009

It always surprises me when I speak to someone and they tell me that their books are not selling. Each and every time it is usually because no effort is going into marketing.

There are a lot of writers out there who depend on their publishing company to do the bulk of their marketing for them. I’m one of those people who is a true believer that you, the writer, have the golden key when it comes to selling your books.

This is not to say that my book sales have been fabulous this month. There are a whole lot of things I could be doing that I have not been doing and at least I recognize that. Every time I am on public transit, I could be slipping my business card to someone with a book in their hand and telling them about my books. I could be hanging around outside bookstores and letting people who are coming in and out know about my books. I could be talking about them in casual conversations every chance I get. Perhaps it is my Canadian politeness factor that keeps me from being that aggressive. However, I am fully aware that I would be selling more books this way.

On an up note, I will be going to a “Faith and the Media” symposium on Thursday, October 1st in Brampton, Ontario. There will be 500 people at this event and I definitely plan to discuss my books. As well, I’m hoping to go to a Simply People festival in October and get a table where I can showcase my books. I just need to work out the timing so it will go well with my teaching hours. Today, there is Word on the Street that is a huge book and magazine festival in Toronto. I was planning to get a booth right after the last one happened called Writer’s Block. This is something I definitely hope to work out for next year. My approach to Word on the Street has been “manana, manana,” always tomorrow, tomorrow. Honestly, I prefer going to the event and it would be great if I had some business cards to let people there know about my books too.

Here’s to self-publishing!

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Where Does Identity, Beauty and Spirituality Fit into Black Feminist Thought?: The Politics of the Black Women Inside and Outside Education


Cover of Garfield Ellis’s Till I’m Laid to Rest – Photo Courtesy of Google Images

It is our roots that give us structure. It is our roots that make us black feminists. It is our roots that give us an identity. It is our roots that give us beauty. It is our roots that give us spirituality. It is our roots that make us black women inside and outside of education.
My father is from Uganda. My mother is from St. Vincent & the Grenadines. I am from Canada. I have always seen these identifying geographical landscapes as placing me where I can find my family roots. These geographical places also help me to form a triad identity of African-Caribbean-Canadian.

My grandfather and grandmother on my father’s side were educators. My father worked as a biology professor at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda. My grandmother on my mother’s side was a principal of a school in St. Vincent. My mother has worked as an English teacher in Canada to children in Korea by telephone. I, too, teach at Centennial College and tutor various subjects for Community Outreach Canada, as well as being a Ph.D. Student at OISE/University of Toronto.

With my identity being that of African-Caribbean-Canadian, my beauty stemming from my African super curly hair, Ugandan-woman inspired rounded body, and my spirituality embracing God – where does black feminist thought fit in? What is black feminist thought? How do these markers I have used to guide the way of the path to understanding black feminist thought demarcate with varying shades of brown and black colours to indicate identity, beauty, and spirituality within black feminist thought – to me? How can these markers affect a deeper understanding for those black women inside education? And a question for those black women who are outside education; how do these markers of identity, beauty and spirituality colour their lives and add the much-needed water to keeping their roots nourished?

To answer these questions, I will be focusing on issues of identity, beauty, and spirituality as discussed in the winter 2011 Black Feminist Thought class with Professor Erica Neeganagwedgin at OISE/University of Toronto. This is the beginning of embarking on an exploration of relating Black Feminist Thought to black hair politics. First I will discuss identity, followed with a discussion of beauty stemming from one of the course’s presentation texts, and finally, I will discuss spirituality.

Issues Around Identity

“As Black women, we need not spend time abstractly theorizing because our practice informs our theory” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 5). As supported by Theorizing Empowerment: Canadian Perspectives on Black Feminist Thought (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007), I picked up my pen and wrote about how this triad of my African-Caribbean-Canadian identity shapes my life through a connection of identity and beauty, which the latter will be discussed later. Here is an example from my book Spiderwoman (Kakonge, 2007) that also aired on the CBC throughout Canada:

Black Hair
Get a group of Black women together and the conversation usually turns to hair.
If I had a dollar for every time I’ve heard a Black woman’s hair story – talked about my own hair – seen people talking about hair in a movie – or read about hair in a book – well, I could buy a lot of hair.

I used to think I was the only one who changed my hair just about every week. But now I know that many other women have permed, straightened, coloured, cut, lengthened and shortened their hair as often as I have.

When I was a child, my first hobby was playing hairdresser to my Barbie dolls. I grew up in the seventies and eighties but I was not much different from Black children in the forties.

Back then, Black children chose White dolls over Black dolls in a landmark study that led to the desegregation of American schools.

It was not that I preferred creamy white skin over chocolate. It just came down to hair. I wanted straight, long, blonde, brunette or red hair – hair that blew in the wind – hair that I could toss over my shoulder.

And when wishing it didn’t make it appear on my head, I used a towel instead.
As I grew older, I spent many years in hair salons turning my head of curly hair dead straight – walking out of the salons with the wind blowing through my hair – and tossing it over my shoulder.

Who says wishes don’t come true – for a price.

Although straightening Black hair is known as perming, there was never anything permanent about it for me. There was a war happening on my head. If my hair represented a people, the curly strands were being ethnically cleansed by straight strands with the use of chemical warfare.

Yet despite the chemicals, I’ve always loved the atmosphere of a salon. In this predominantly white country, Black hair salons create a Black world. During the civil rights movement, North American barber shops and hair salons became town halls for discussions on race relations.

Even now, a hair salon in South Carolina is being used to educate people about AIDS. Places for hair are no strangers to political activity.

And it is in a salon that I found peace with the politics happening in my own head. Hairdressers looking at my natural hair – and not opening up a jar of Bone Strait – made me rejoice in the hair God gave me.

Professor and author Gloria Wade-Gayles once said: “my hair would be a badge, a symbol of my pride, a statement of self-affirmation.”

Well, it has taken me a long time, but I finally agree.

Currently researching the politics of black hair at OISE/University of Toronto in a Ph.D. program of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning Development, the above shows how much my hair is part of my identity, as well how it inspires me to write and to think. The above also exemplifies the words of Rai Reece’s “Canadian Black Feminist Thought and Scholar-Activist Praxis,” in Theorizing Empowerment (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007). Reece notes that there is a critical need for more black female academics, as well as black female activists in the academy. Reece goes onto her second point that there is no single “axis” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 267) where black feminism needs to be explored. As I discuss in the excerpt from Spiderwoman (Kakonge, 2007), my natural hair was something that made me feel a want to flee from my identity as a black person. My natural hair was something that made me feel a want to perceive myself as ugly. My natural hair was something that made me feel a want to look like the other pretty black women on TV, like Janet Jackson in “Good Times” and Roxy Roper on “The Jeffersons.” My hair became a personal indicator for me of not accepting my roots – not accepting how God made me – not accepting my identity.

Notisha Massaquoi in “An Unsettled Feminist Discourse,” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007), writes about her identity connecting that with her family roots of a Sierra Leonean father and a Trinidadian mother. Massaquoi was once called a “Diasporic Baby” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 75). Massaquoi goes onto to quote Njoki Nathani Wane (2002): “A black feminist theory from a Canadian perspective is truly a construction of embodied knowledge that is grounded in the bodily experience of specific materiality” (Wane 2002) (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 76). The challenges with the natural hair of black women is an embodied knowledge that is played out in images of black women with smooth, straight, controlled hair – hair that resembles whites. I have not ever seen a black woman working in a bank with an afro, whereas I have seen afros among black female professors. I have not ever seen a black woman who was a doctor wearing natural hair, whereas I have seen natural hair on black Canadian singing stars. I have not ever seen a black woman with skin as dark as the reflection of my eyes closed, anchoring the six o’clock news on any television station. Black women have developed an embodied knowledge of their place in society. Black women are viewed, mainly by whites, through visions of their bodily physical appearances and all of the stereotypes and the archetypes embodied in what black women can or cannot do. Our roots to Canada are threatened every time an “other” asks, “Where do you come from?”
With the uprooting of African peoples from the continent, colonization and the diaspora where many of us are born, it can be difficult to answer that question at times: “Where do you come from?” as a black woman in Canada. Although a work of fiction, Till I’m Laid to Rest by Garfield Ellis (2010) also tells a story that is true for many of home displacement for women who mainly conduct themselves outside of education. For the protagonist of Ellis’s story, Shirley Temple Brown, it is Shirley’s beauty, Shirley’s hair, Shirley’s identity, which ultimately embodies her relationship to the men that change her life and create an understanding of black feminist thought that uproots her. Shirley, who settles well in her homeland in Jamaica, makes the choices to aspire to European ideals of success that wind up entrapping her in a web of misery that has her returning to Jamaica in shackles and shame. This results in her disconnection from the strong roots of her Jamaican heritage, which will be explored further through issues of beauty and later in issues of spirituality.

Issues Around Beauty

Shirley Temple Brown in Till I’m Laid to Rest (Ellis, 2010) is viewed as more beautiful than her friend Dawn who is of darker skin and has a coarser hair texture when compared to Shirley’s hair. Shirley is half-Indian on her father’s side and based on her looks, does not identify with being black. An example of Shirley defining her identity with other than black takes place when she is on a date with a younger white man she meets on a Miami beach who claims to be a model agent:

“You know I’ve never dated a black woman before,” he said, as they continued walking.

“I’m not black,” Shirley said.

“I thought you said you were Jamaican.”

“I am.”

“Then you are black.”

“I am half-Indian,” Shirley said.

“Is that like Hispanic or something? Your parents are not Jamaican, uh?

“They are.” She sipped the wine.

“So how do you mean you are not black?”

“Do I look black to you?” Shirley wanted to change the subject. He obviously did not understand.

He paused, unsure. “I guess.”

“It does not matter.” Shirley dropped the subject (Ellis, 2010, pg. 168-169).

However, it does matter. Shirley is denying her blackness or does not realize that she considered black in a country such as America, unlike her more Indian identity in a country such as Jamaica, as Professor Erica Neeganagwedgin has explained in class about identity formation in Jamaica. There is another point in the Ellis (2010) book where Shirley is speaking with her husband Moet and states that she did not know she was black until she came to America. The fact this so-called white model agent was certain she was black at first, then unsure at Shirley’s denial of being black, is a situation that is not resolved since Shirley drops the subject, claiming “it does not matter” (Ellis, 2010, pg. 169). Yet, is there something wrong with being black? Shirley had no problem with the Indian in her family; by stating she is “half-Indian” (Ellis, 2010, pg. 168). When you look at the historical legacy of black people in the Americas, wrenched out in chest-pounding words that spring from the page by poet d’bi young at the beginning of Theorizing Empowerment: Canadian Perspectives on Black Feminist Thought (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007) a thoughtful answer to the question, what is wrong with being black surfaces:

here we have a negro wench
gentlemen and gentlemen
starting at four hundred dollars
strong hands/strong legs/strong spirit
but not stronger than yours (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 2).

Shirley, despite her long, black and silky half-Indian tresses had previously lived the experience using her strong hands, strong legs and strong spirit working for a white family and their children who turned her into a modern-day “negro wench” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 2). Later on, in this scene of Till, I’m Laid to Rest with Shirley Temple Brown as its star, Shirley’s conversation with the so-called model agent turns to violence as he seems to stick to his original thoughts that she is black and he attempts to rape her…remembering that Shirley’s power is not stronger than his (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 2). Shirley acts fast and runs for safety back to her job of looking after a retired model with Alzheimer’s disease. The brutal violence forced on Shirley by the younger white man goes unmentioned in Till I’m Laid to Rest (Ellis, 2010) after, as though Shirley should have expected nothing less. This disregard and lack of the care of Shirley’s body, mind and spirit was all a part of her life in Miami that began when she met Mark, the older rich businessman who worked in the tourism industry and put the idea of coming to Miami into Shirley’s head. The character Mark in the novel seems to remind Shirley of her late father who died in a car accident. The first man to put the idea of “greatness” into Shirley’s head was her father who even named after the movie star Shirley Temple, hence her name being Shirley Temple Brown. With Shirley’s identity and beauty politics tied into colonization, as many of us of colour do have our identity and beauty politics tied into colonization, thoughts of where “greatness” lies are often seen in the west. Thoughts of where “greatness” lie is not in the west of the Caribbean necessarily, however in America, in Europe at times for some…these are the places where dreams await people of colour – the American Dream is a classic one. Shirley went to America to find her dream and instead because she was acutely made aware of her black identity, she realized a shattered dream.

Shirley first met Mark at the Mutual Security Bank where she worked in Kingstown, Jamaica. Mark was bringing in a lot of money and discussed his banking with Shirley many times since she was the junior manager. Shirley could see that Mark was rich and when he asked her out for a date, she agreed. He took her to decadent places, showing her how the wealthy in Jamaica live. This was different for Shirley, having grown up poor. This was different for Shirley, also having grown up without her father who died in a car crash. Shirley and Mark’s first sexual liaison was on a bed of roses with some thorns:

“What are you doing?” She made to turn and stumbled onto the bed. He pushed her onto it and she fought him back. But he was heavy and big, and although he held her lightly his grasp was firm.

“Mind you scrape yourself on the basket,” he said huskily.

“Stop,” she whispered. “Mark, stop a little. We have to discuss this.”

“Mind you head,” he said, as he tried to shove the basket away. “Mind you head.”

She struggled with him for a while but he held her down and managed to slip both her hands through the strings of her dress (Ellis, 2010, pg. 13).

Mark forced himself on Shirley and took away her virginity. Later in this scene of Till, I’m Laid to Rest (Ellis, 2010), Shirley clearly gives in…simply surrendering to a man that had been lavishing her with pricey restaurants and Victoria Secret underwear gifts once he was tired of playing the game of cat and mouse. Shirley clearly gives in…simply surrendering to her status as a working-class woman, from a poor Jamaican background. Mark trapped Shirley. A beautiful young woman such as Shirley who would not have ever given a second glance at Mark on the street if he did not have the economic capital that he possesses – she was bought out. Shirley was tempted to do so because of her poor economic status growing up and her emotional aspirations to realize the dreams that her deceased father had set out for her. Llana James writes about the “Censure and Silence: Sexual Violence and Women of the African Diaspora” in Theorizing Empowerment. James (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007) writes that points of entry of women of the African diaspora into a country are important considerations when you look at sexual violence. When looking at Shirley Temple Brown’s situation in Till I’m Laid to Rest, the sexual violence of Mark is what links her to this man in a way that leads her to Miami. Another turning point is what was mentioned earlier with the sexual violence of the so-called model agent who forces himself on Shirley without success, however successfully leading Shirley to a party that connects her to Moet – the man she later marries and is also the cause of her serving jail time and being deported back to Jamaica.

Enter Shirley Temple Brown’s mother…a woman who is so devoted to God that she prays and reads The Bible day and night, night and day. She lives in a one-room shanty house with a wall that threatens to fail her in Sufferer’s Heights, Jamaica. She works cleaning for others at a hospital. She has no criminal record. She has a son who is a police officer in Jamaica. She is always there for her daughter Shirley – this…Shirley can ALWAYS count on until the day Miss Ivey passes. Her roots are in Jamaica and Miss Ivey rests and stays there, despite the poverty in her life. Is Shirley Temple Brown’s mother an example that faith in God, or having a spiritual life is exactly what can keep black women become rooted? Is Shirley Temple Brown’s mother an example that faith in God can keep mind, body and spirit, or identity, beauty, and spirit together?

Issues of Spirituality

For Miss Ivey, the life of glamour with a potentially married white man, the life of an illegal immigrant, the life of a maid to white people, the life of marrying a drug dealer is evidently beyond the life she had imagined for her daughter Shirley Temple Brown. Miss Ivey criticizes her daughter’s lifestyle with each meeting with her. The following is also evidently more in Miss Ivey’s mind of the way she would want her daughter to live: “At some deeper level all living things are interconnected and there is a desire or a determination to live a life characterized by humility, empathy, mindfulness and purpose” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 27). This statement was written by Professor Erica Neeganagwedgin and Professor Njoki Wane at OISE/University of Toronto clearly sets a marker for the way many black women would love to live. Despite Shirley Temple Brown’s problems in Till I’m Laid to Rest (Ellis, 2010), she also indicates that she is searching for the same things that Neegangwedgin and Wane point out in Theorizing Empowerment (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007). Shirley is always in search of living a life of “humility, empathy, mindfulness and purpose” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 27). She leaves her mother for Mark in the search. She leaves Jamaica in a search. She leaves the white family in a search. She leaves Miami to return to Jamaica in a search. Then, despite her searching and because her roots are so damaged, as her relationship with Miss Ivey (her mother) continue to erode and she sees her friends move on with their lives – her search for identity, beauty (and the beautiful life), and spirituality land her in jail. She humbly returns to Jamaica in handcuffs as she is deported after four years of being in jail. She serves jail time because she was helping her drug-dealing husband Moet who she at first married to live in luxury (which coming from poverty was something she did not know), and she later fell in love with him because he was a sincere, but dangerous man.

Wane’s (2007) “Practicing African Spirituality: Insights from Zulu-Latifa, an African Woman Healer” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007), gives tools for the way women such as Shirley Temple Brown can identify and recapture their soul. Many times the spiritual tools that we receive are handed down to us through our mothers. I rebelled against my mother when I was younger – not heeding her wise words. Although I did not end up in the same kind of trouble that Shirley Temple Brown ended up in, this disconnection from her originally connecting me with the Methodist church and the teachings of God was something that I came to understand only through an on-going path to maturity. It is also an on-going path that informs my work as a black female educator.

Conclusion
By exploring issues around identity with my own personal call to pick up the pen and write about the politics of black hair with the support of Theorizing Empowerment (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007), as well as entwining branches with others inside education with a shared “Diasporic Baby” (Massaquoi and Wane, 2007, pg. 75) identity and understanding of how my identity has formed with a lack of representation in Canadian culture and media, I call for more black female academics to pick up their pen and tell their stories, to entwine their branches through words, collectives, and organizing and to push for more representation in Canadian culture and media.
By exploring issues around beauty, I encourage those women outside education who are treated as black to demand just treatment from men and other women – from everyone and everything. Women must understand that their lives also serve to educate others, even if it is through written fiction and through the telling of the truth of their value and beauty – only this way, will their roots be preserved.

By exploring issues around spirituality we must look to our mothers and to the elders of society to guide us on our spiritual paths. As there are many branches on a tree, there are many routes to the creator and we must find one that works best for us to preserve the sanctity of our lives as black women.

It is our roots that give us structure. It is our roots that make us black feminists. It is our roots that give us an identity. It is our roots that give us beauty. It is our roots that give us spirituality. It is our roots that make us black women inside and outside of education.

References
Ellis, G. (2010). Till I’m Laid to Rest. Nsemia Press, Oakville, Canada.
Kakonge, D. (2007). Spiderwoman. Lulu.com: Self-Published.
Massaquoi, N. and Wane, N. (2007). Theorizing Empowerment: Canadian Perspectives on Black Feminist Thought. Inanna Publications: Toronto.

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Paperback Books on Lulu.com as low as $5.70


Discounted Books – Photo Courtesy of Google Images

You can find paperback books as low as $5.70 and hardcover books for under $15.00 at http://stores.lulu.com/kakonged. Shop early and save. Get an additional 20 percent off with the code GIANT on checkout.

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Book review of Cane by Jean Toomer


Cane - August 11, 2009

Jean Toomer is the Author of Cane

Image result for Cane by Jean Toomer

I came across this book for three dollars at a Lebanese restaurant in the McGill ghetto of Montreal. It was worth every penny and proves that you can find good books for affordable prices.

Jean Toomer was a genius. Cane is part of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920’s. This book has influenced such writers as Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Eric Walrond, Zora Neale Hurston, Wallace Thurman, Rudolph Fisher and his other contemporaries of the 20s. When reading the book, there is no wonder that it had a tremendous impact, and should be revisited for some reasons I will point out now.

The book is unique in style. A combination of short stories, with poetry which all have an undercurrent of the racism that existed during the 20s. Toomer himself was a mixed-race man, living a borderline life between the black and white worlds, and his characters are sometimes white, sometimes black, probably reflecting his inner feelings.

There’s Esther who lusts after a black man who had a religious experience in the street and she spends years pining for him. And then there’s Becky who had two Negro sons who live in a house by the road and no one knows whether she’s dead or alive.

He writes of sorrow such as this between blacks and whites, but also of the beauty of women, and the ugliness of women. For a man, he writes women well.

His description of people and places is so lively, it is like the book is a TV screen where you can hear and see. Here’s one example from his poetry, this one called « Face »:

Hair-

Silver-gray,

Like streams of stars,

Brows-

Recurved canoes

Quivered by the ripples blown by pain,

Her eyes-

Mist of tears

Condensing on the flesh below

And her channeled muscles

Are cluster grapes of sorrow

Purple in the evening sun

Nearly ripe for worms.

His imaginary is startling. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to understand the desperation of living with the race relations of the 20s of the United States. Also, just anyone who loves good writing. The sentences are short and clear. He wastes no words to strengthen his point. Just like chewing on sugar cane strengthens the teeth.  Cane.

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Donna’s Online Store Sale


Image result for Sale

Get up to 30 percent off everything in the store until December at http://stores.lulu.com/kakonged.

Get an extra 10 percent off the already low prices with the code HARVEST at http://stores.lulu.com/kakonged. Enter the code at checkout!

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Selling Books in Nathan Philips Square July 20th


Donna Kakonge Will Be Selling Her Books at Nathan Philips Square in Toronto on Tuesday – Photo Courtesy of Dreamstime.com

Donna Kakonge - July 14, 2010

Check out the posting for the Simply People Festival for more details on the event. I will be selling my books there on Tuesday evening. I look forward to meeting you in Toronto.

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My Spidey Senses are Tingling


Chris Temelkos Writes About Spider-Man – Photo Courtesy of Marvel.com

Chris Temelkos - May 25, 2010 - Marvel.com

By Chris Temelkos

Superheroes have always been a part of our childhood and often remain popular with us as we grow old. From the gorgeous Amazonian Wonder Woman to the world-renowned Superman, superheroes inspire us while broadening our imagination.

Looking back at my childhood, I can remember idolizing my favorite superheroes. One of my favorites happens to be Spider-Man, the web-slinging, wall climbing superhero who first appeared in 1962. Peter Parker, the man behind Spider-Man, was easy to relate to, he was a very shy child who was often bullied at school, although he was very intelligent. Many of us have been through a time when we didn’t quite fit in and Spider-Man showed us that anything was possible through his transition from geek to superhero.

Now that I am an adult, I find it quite ironic that my childhood idol Peter Parker (Spider-Man) happens to be a freelance photographer for a newspaper called the Daily Bugle, while I happen to be involved in print and journalism as well. Spidey must have had some influence on my career decisions.

Whether you’re an avid comic book reader or not, superheroes have become a staple in our culture. They can be found everywhere, from toys to movies, cartoons and more. They will continue to inspire and intrigue one generation to the next and perhaps, even adults who are kids at heart.

Source:

Marvel.com

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A Wish After Midnight


Zetta Elliott is the Author of A Wish Before Midnight – Photo Courtesy of the HappyNappyBookseller.com

 

Zetta Elliott - March 28, 2010

A WISH AFTER MIDNIGHT
By Zetta Elliott

“When we contrast the condition of blacks in the 19th century with that of blacks living in the 21st century, we’re inclined to think the difference is like night and day. But speculative fiction reframes the past, creating a kind of literary lens that enables us to look more closely at the shifting definition of freedom. Have we really crossed the finish line? I think a lot of us still have a long way to go…”

Adapted from the interview with Zetta Elliott on Omnivoracious.com

Inspired by the work of Octavia Butler, the African American science fiction writer, as well as her favorite childhood book, The Secret Garden, debut novelist Zetta Elliott takes readers back to Civil War-era Brooklyn – and the draft riots – in her new book, A WISH AFTER MIDNIGHT (February 16, 2010; $12.95). Provoking the question “What if?”, Elliott’s characters yearn for what is possible in a tumultuous world.

A WISH AFTER MIDNIGHT gives readers a hopeful young heroine, Genna Colon, stuck in the confines of a tough neighborhood in 2001’s inner-city Brooklyn. Frustrated by the drug dealers in her building, her family’s cramped apartment, and her inability to compete with the cute girls at school, Genna finds comfort in her dreams of a better future. Almost every day she escapes to the peaceful haven of the Brooklyn Botanical Garden and tosses coins into the fountain, wishing for a different life, a different home, and a different body. But when Genna flees into the garden late one night after an explosive family fight, her wish goes awry and she finds herself instantly transported back in time to the turbulent months leading up to the notorious New York draft riots. Facing the deadly realities of racism and class structure in Civil War-era Brooklyn, Genna must fight to survive, hold on to her individuality and rise above the hand she has been dealt in two different worlds.

With broad appeal for both teens and adults, A WISH AFTER MIDNIGHT is a thought-provoking journey, offering the chance to re-live history and re-examine our present with a fresh perspective.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Zetta Elliott earned her Ph.D. in American Studies from New York University and has lived in Brooklyn for the past 15 years, where she has become a student of its unique history. She is also a poet and playwright, and her picture book, Bird, was the recipient of a 2009 ALA Notable Children’s Book award. Learn more about her at www.zettaelliott.com or watch the book’s trailer at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SU54KOI05Fs.

ABOUT AMAZONENCORE:

AmazonEncore is an exciting new publisher that serves an important purpose in the world of contemporary literature, bringing attention to exceptional books that have been overlooked by readers or traditional publishers.

###

A WISH AFTER MIDNIGHT

By Zetta Elliott

AmazonEncore; Publication Date: February 16, 2010

Paperback; $12.95; 272 Pages

Zetta Elliott, PhD

writer ~ educator

www.zettaelliott.com

www.zettaelliott.wordpress.com

“Zetta Elliott’s time travel novel A Wish After Midnight is a bit of a revelation…It’s vivid, violent and impressive history.” ~ Colleen Mondor, Bookslut. Learn more about A WISH AFTER MIDNIGHT here.

Zetta Elliott’s first picture book, BIRD, has “unusual depth and raw conviction… [the] child-centered narrative excels.” ~ starred review, Kirkus Reviews. Find out more about BIRD at http://www.leeandlow.com/books/176/hc/bird

Discover other titles by Zetta Elliott at www.zettaelliott.wordpress.com/rosetta-press/

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Coming Up on Donna Magazine


Coming Up on Donna Magazine, there will be reviews from books by Dennis Desrosiers, Mikaya Heart and others. Look out for them soon.

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Get 10 Per Cent Off


Book Sale - March 1, 2010

Get 10 percent off at Donna’s Online Store with the code IDES. That’s 10 percent off at http://stores.lulu.com/kakonged.

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Get a Free Book When You Buy a Book


Get a Free Book When You Buy a Book – Photo Courtesy of Dreamstime.com

Working On My Sleep

 

Get a free book when you buy a book. Contact me at dkakonge@sympatico.ca for the special code.

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Expanding Self-Publishing Ventures


Self-Publishing One - December 6, 2009

I am someone who loves self-publishing. I have spent this entire weekend, with the exception of a bit of marking, expanding my self-publishing pool.

I have 32 books for the offer on Lulu.com (http://store.lulu.com/kakonged). Now I am waiting to find out about whether my books will be accepted for Amazon Kindle as e-books, as well as CreateSpace. CreateSpace is similar to Lulu.com, however, is one of Amazon.com’s companies.

It was a lot of hard work. Having my books on Lulu.com made it a lot easier. I found the Kindle system fairly easy to use, however with my computer at times it would take a lot of time to upload large documents that would have photos.

CreateSpace uses a .pdf format. I found this extremely efficient for uploading large files that also had photos. The first entry point seems a bit daunting at first and I ran across some glitches at first. The excellent thing about CreateSpace is that they offer free ISBNs that are generated instantly if you do not have one. This way you can also make your books available for international distribution, as well as available in libraries.

Overall I found my time working on these self-publishing projects to be well-spent. Even though I have 32 books published, I was unable to publish them all. Lulu.com may remain the key depot to find all of my books. I was able to offer some of my books for better prices than they appear on Amazon.com currently, as well as Lulu.com. I will keep you posted.

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Canadian content making its mark on U.S. media


Rachel Muenz Writes About the Impact Canada Has on the U.S.

Rachel Muenz Writes About the Impact Canada Has on the U.S.

Rachel Muenz - Canadian Impact - September 25, 2009

By Rachel Muenz

There’s been a lot of talks lately about how many Canadian TV shows have been picked up by U.S. networks this fall. But while U.S. TV has the most Canadian content, Canadians are having a decent impact on other areas of U.S. pop culture as well.

Continue reading

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