Book Launch

A manuscript Donna started in the 1990s is a published book in 2007. She retains copyright and it is self-published with Lulu.com and on Amazon. In the winter of 2011, she takes an expressive writing course at the University of Toronto. Encouraged to send a manuscript to the publisher, she sends Do Not Know.
The book is about Donna’s battle with mental illness mainly in her twenties.
The publisher decides to go with it. They work on it for more than a year. During this time, she publishes a story called Lizard in the Yard with the same publisher who is willing to re-publish Do Not Know.
As soon as the publisher finds out that she is also doing a law degree and she negotiates intelligently over the contract, the books that her editor does have do not get sent to the book launch Donna planned herself. The contract is not ever signed by Donna.
Donna self-publishes the book the next day and it is now called How To Talk To Crazy People. It is published in Lulu.com, Amazon Kindle, Amazon, iBookstore and Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Sony Reader as an ebook and/or as a paperback, in hardcover. There is also now an app available on the Apple Store.
Things are also now resolved with the traditional publisher of How To Talk To Crazy People.
Donna is a writer now. Not knowing how little writers make in Canada, she ensured that she found her material foundation by the age of around forty. Her high school teacher Mr. MacPherson was right. She does not own herself two fridges, two stoves, own two cars and many, many homes. Sometimes she wonders if she should have listened to her best friend in high school who is now a doctor in Vancouver when she said: “go for the money.”
There is peace in Donna’s life. The Kasacba family has grown. Atwoki is getting older but is still in very, very good health. Rachel is hanging in there and “surviving” as she says. She has a surgery in late August of 2014 that should go well. As far as Donna knows, this is the first surgery she has had since giving birth to Karen. Understandably this would lead to anxiety.
Karen gave birth to two girls. They are bright, beautiful, a lot of fun and sparkling darlings of the child world. Karen works with children who have brain disorders. Robert is a senior officer in the government and lives outside of Toronto. He is also living with a woman who is going to Atwoki’s alma mater and also doing her Ph.D. Rachel also helps to take care of her grandchildren.
The Kasacba spirit will forever live on. This family is like a hidden treasure in the dynasty of black families in Canada.

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