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Archive for October, 2011|Monthly archive page

Please come see me in “Barefoot in the Park”

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Music, Technology, Writing (all kinds) on October 29, 2011 at 3:00 AM

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Hi, Everyone:

I’ll be playing “Victor Velasco” in Theatre Etobicoke’s upcoming production of Barefoot in the Park. It’s a really fun show – hope you can make it…. it would be great to see you there.

Edgar Nentwig

Celebrating Four Years of Donna Magazine

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Technology, Writing (all kinds) on October 28, 2011 at 3:00 AM

Image result for Donna Magazine - Donna Kakonge

This month marks four years of Donna Magazine. Thank you for reading!

[TPS] – Halloween safety tips‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Technology, Writing (all kinds) on October 27, 2011 at 8:34 AM

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Toronto Police Service
News Release

Halloween safety tips

Thursday, October 27, 2011 – 8:00 AM
Corporate Communications
416-808-7100

The Toronto Police Service would like to take this opportunity to remind parents, caregivers, children and motorists that every effort should be made to keep Halloween a safe and enjoyable occasion.

Here are some general safety tips:

– consider dressing your child in a light-coloured costume. Reflective tape or armbands placed on the costume can help increase visibility. Carrying a small flashlight to light the way between houses is a good idea and helps make children more visible on dark residential streets

– if your child will be wearing a mask, increase the eye openings to improve vision. Consider the use of makeup as an alternative to wearing a mask

– prior to Halloween, ensure the costume is the proper length to reduce the risk of tripping. Do not allow your child to ride a bicycle while in costume; it could become tangled in the chain or spokes. If the costume is purchased, ensure it is made of flame-retardant material

– ensure children have something to eat before they begin to Trick or Treat. It’s very important that no treats are consumed until they have been carefully inspected by an adult

– young children should be accompanied by an adult. Older children should be encouraged to go out in groups, stay together and utilize the “buddy system”

– approach only lit houses

– discuss with your children the route they will be traveling and what time they are required to return home. They should stay in familiar neighbourhoods

– Trick or Treat along one side of the street, then cross over carefully to the other side. Avoid running back and forth across the street

– Attention drivers! Children will be very excited and their actions could be sudden and unpredictable. Exercise caution and slow down.

– Homeowners! Make sure your yard is clear and safe. Please ensure pets are in a safe place so no harm will come to them or the children

Let’s all have a safe and happy Halloween.

Please click here for a Halloween colouring booklet.

Constable Wendy Drummond, Corporate Communications

There are no files attached to this release.

Join us for Gailey Road’s Fundraiser Women Writing Letters: A Letter to the Night I’d Rather Forget!

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Writing (all kinds) on October 27, 2011 at 3:00 AM

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Join Gailey Road for an afternoon of letter reading to raise funds for Gailey Road’s next production: Ana’s Shadow.

A panel of established and up-and-coming women artists and writers will be reading their letters to “The Night I’d Rather Forget!”

NISHA AHUJA, Theatre artist, creator of Cycle of a Sari and The Besetting of Reena Virk
JULIA GRAY, Playwright, author of After the Crash
MARCIA JOHNSON, Playwright, actor, author of Courting Joanna
HOLLY LUHNING, Novelist, author of Quiver
MELISSA MAJOR, Theatre artist, creator of Infinitim

Date: Sunday, October 30, 2011
Time: 2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Place: MAJORspace @ The Art Triangle Lofts

Admission: $10.00

Reservations: gaileyroad@gmail.com Space is limited, reservations are a must!

See you there!

Tara Goldstein
Founding Director
Gailey Road Productions
http://www.gaileyroad.com

[TPS] – Retired TPS officer (and renowned landscape painter) lends talent to United Way drive, Tuesday, October 25, 2011, 7 a.m. – 7 p.m., Headquarters, lobby‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Technology, Writing (all kinds) on October 26, 2011 at 11:06 AM

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Toronto Police Service
News Release

Retired TPS officer (and renowned landscape painter) lends talent to United Way drive, Tuesday, October 25, 2011, 7 a.m. – 7 p.m., Headquarters, lobby

Tuesday, October 25, 2011 – 5:00 AM
Corporate Communications
416-808-7100

A retired TPS police officer is returning to headquarters for one more day at the office to support a good cause.

Internationally recognized painter Tim Packer, who left the TPS in 2000 after 18 years’ service, is using his artistic talent to make a contribution to help the Service reach its 2011 United Way campaign fundraising target of $655,000.

On Tuesday, October 25, 2011, in the headquarters lobby, Tim Packer will create an oil painting that will be auctioned to the highest bidder, with proceeds will go to the United Way campaign.

“We were delighted when the offer was made,” fundraising committee member Sharon Cairns said. “It was like music to our ears. This is a fantastic gesture for a great cause.” Ottawa’s Koyman Galleries, which represent Packer, have already opened the bidding at $2,000. “As you can see, the bar has already been set high,” Cairns said. “One of his paintings, of the size he’s doing for us, normally retails for around $4,000, so we’re hoping that the piece will fetch much more.”

Packer will arrive at headquarters at the crack of dawn to set up his easel and canvas. He has committed to staying as long as it takes to produce the original oil-on-canvas piece, which will be either 30” x 40” or 36” x 36”.

“I know from past experience that, when I paint in this type of situation, there is a heightened sense of focus and excitement that allows me to paint with much greater intensity than usual, for much longer, and often with stunning results,” Packer said. “I am confident that the piece will be completed before I leave headquarters on the night of October 25.”

The bidding runs from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, October 25, 2011. Bidding can be done in person at 40 College Street, or by phone at 416-808-8930. Limited-edition reproductions of Packer’s work will also be on sale during the day at a 10% discount, with 10% of all sales going to the United Way.

Packer’s unique style draws on the deep traditions of Canadian landscape painting, while interpreting the world through a modern eye. His bold oils rely on a strong sense of design and the abstract patterns found in the natural world, often combined with a dramatic light condition.

The George Brown College Graphic Design graduate, whose work can be found in many private and corporate collections, made history four years ago by becoming the first artist to sell over $10,000 worth of paintings at the McMichael Canadian Collection annual autumn sale in Kleinburg. He broke the record a year later, achieving sales of close to $20,000.

Packer, who lives in Whitby with his wife and two children, is the president of the Oshawa Art Association, a past-president of the Canadian Society of Painters in Watercolour and a senior signature member of the Canadian Society of Portrait Artists. Click here to visit Tim’s website.

Constable Wendy Drummond, Corporate Communications

There are no files attached to this release.

Looking for leaders: TRIEC calls for 6th Annual Immigrant Success Awards entries

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Writing (all kinds) on October 26, 2011 at 3:00 AM

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Canada NewsWire

TORONTO, Oct. 11, 2011

Awards recognize recruiting, integrating and leveraging skilled immigrant talent

TORONTO, Oct. 11, 2011, /CNW/ – The Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council (TRIEC) is pleased to announce the call for entries for the 6th Annual Immigrant Success (IS) Awards, sponsored by RBC. Each year, TRIEC presents the IS Awards to recognize innovation and leadership in integrating skilled immigrants into the Greater Toronto Region labour market.

To date, 25 trailblazers, employers, and individuals have been recognized. If you or your organization deserve to be recognized but aren’t yet among our alumni – don’t miss your chance this year. Employers and individuals are invited to apply or submit a nomination by Thursday, December 1, 2011, at http://www.isawards.ca.

There are four IS Awards:

RBC Immigrant Advantage Award
This award will recognize an organization that demonstrates the business impact of leveraging the skills of immigrants, yielding tangible results for both business and immigrants.

CBC Toronto Vision Award for Immigrant Inclusion
This award will recognize a unique initiative that breaks down employment barriers for skilled immigrants and has the potential to affect change beyond one organization. This innovative practice has the potential for wider impact because of partnerships.

Toronto Star Award for Excellence in Workplace Integration
This award will recognize ONE practice or a suite of practices related to ONE of the following: sourcing, recruiting, onboarding, integration, inclusion or promotion of skilled immigrants. The practice or suite of practices must be innovative and fully implemented and established with positive results that are transforming the organization.

Canadian HR Reporter Individual Achievement Award
This award will recognize an individual who has demonstrated leadership and innovation in HR practice in integrating skilled immigrants in the workplace.

“From our research, we know that one in five Toronto Region employers has hired a skilled immigrant to help them expand globally and locally, and feels that employees with international education and experience are effective in helping them meet these business goals,” says Elizabeth McIsaac, Executive Director of TRIEC. “We need to hear from those employers, so we can share their stories of success.”

Winners will be recognized in the media and by their peers as leaders in an area of increasing importance to the Canadian economy. Each will receive a handcrafted IS Awards sculpture. RBC will host a reception to honour the winners in spring 2012.

“RBC’s funding support of the IS Awards reflects our strong belief that diversity is a competitive advantage – and the winner stories prove it. The more employers tap the full range of capabilities of our workforce – to innovate, develop untapped markets and foster new relationships – the more competitive Canada will be in the global economy and the more prosperous we will be at home,” says Zabeen Hirji, Chief Human Resources Officer at RBC.

Since the awards launched five years ago, over 25 employers and individuals have been recognized. Previous winners include CH2M HILL Canada Limited, Deloitte, Fraser Milner Casgrain LLP, George Brown College, I3 International, Nytric Limited, Pitney Bowes, Samtack, St. Micheal’s Hospital, Steam Whistle Brewing, Thales Canada, Transportation, Toronto Foundation for Student Success and Xerox Research Centre of Canada, as well as individuals from American Express Technologies, CIBC, Ernst & Young, KPMG, Procter & Gamble and TD Bank Financial Group.

“With over 90 percent of our 100-person staff comprised of immigrants, we’ve leveraged that talent to respond to changing needs of mass merchant customers; to increase market share with smaller, diverse retailers; and to purchase parts from overseas suppliers,” says Royson Ng, President at Samtack, past winner of the RBC Immigrant Advantage Award. “Winning an IS Award makes us proud of our company culture and has resulted in lots of welcome media coverage – something special for a small business like Samtack.”

Online applications can be completed in minutes. For full details, online entry forms and profiles of previous winners, visit http://www.isawards.ca.

A panel of senior human resource professionals, business executives and industry stakeholders will judge the IS Award submissions.

The IS Awards are a program of the Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council (TRIEC), sponsored by RBC with media partners Canadian HR Reporter, CBC Toronto and The Toronto Star.

About TRIEC

The Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council (TRIEC) creates and champions solutions to better integrate skilled immigrants in the Greater Toronto Region labour market. http://www.triec.ca.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/448818#ixzz1aZ1CvByB

CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 24 to 28 October 2011‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Radio Podcasts, Technology, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on October 24, 2011 at 3:00 AM

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CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 24 to 28 October
2011

The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory policies
in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to change
without notice.

Broadcasting decisions:
Application by Bell Aliant Regional Communications, Limited Partnership http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-317.htm
to amend the broadcasting licence for its regional terrestrial service

Application by Bell ExpressVu Limited Partnership http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-317.htm to amend the
broadcasting licence for its video-on-demand service

Applications by Fabienne Colas, on behalf of a corporation to be
incorporated, for broadcasting licences to operate Diversité TV http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-336.htm#3
and Bon Goût TV http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-336.htm#4, national, French-language Category B specialty services

Application by Dufferin Communications Inc. http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-427.htm#33 for authority to acquire from
Newcap Inc. the assets of the commercial radio stations CHNK-FM Winnipeg
(formerly CHNR-FM Winnipeg) and CKJS Winnipeg

Applications by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation https://services.crtc.gc.ca/pub/instances-proceedings/Default-Defaut.aspx?S=O&PA=B&PT=PT1&PST=A&Lang=eng (CBC) to amend the
broadcasting licences for the radio station CBGA-FM Matane in order to
operate new transmitters in Chandler, New Carlisle, New Richmond, Percé
and Port-Daniel

Application by the CBC https://services.crtc.gc.ca/pub/instances-proceedings/Default-Defaut.aspx?S=O&PA=B&PT=PT1&PST=A&Lang=e to amend the broadcasting licence for the radio
station CBTK-FM Kelowna by adding a new FM transmitter in Lillooet

Telecom Decision:
No decision

Hamilton Heroes (originally written for Young People’s Press and Big Brothers Big Sisters)

In Education, Technology, travel, Writing (all kinds) on October 22, 2011 at 3:00 AM

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Hamilton Heroes

Don Lawson remembers his Grade 1 teacher.

“When you walked into that teacher’s classroom she made you feel like you were the most special thing she encountered that day.”

Lawson, now the director of marketing at Big Brothers of Burlington and Hamilton-Wentworth, says that’s the effect mentors have children who go to Big Brothers.

“When a child feels liked by an adult, it really helps their self-esteem,” he says, adding that has many positive outcomes, such as children staying in school and keeping out of trouble with the law.

But since Lawson started as executive director of Big Brothers of Barrie and District in 1986, the number of volunteers getting involved with Big Brothers and Big Sisters organizations across Canada has been falling.

Kids in Hamilton and Burlington wait for one to two years to be matched with a volunteer, Lawson says.

The difficulty of quickly matching kids with mentors is why Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada (BBBSC) has “focused on revitalizing the big brother, big sister movement,” Lawson says.

Digital Heroes, an e-mentoring program, being piloted in nine agencies in Ontario, is one way that BBBSC is trying to increase volunteerism.

Lawson attributes much of the decline in volunteers to more rigorous work schedules.

Digital Heroes, however, takes one hour a week of a volunteer’s time, and can be done from home or work.

In traditional matches, the pair gets together weekly for recreational activities. Digital Heroes is modeled after the traditional program, except any interaction takes place over the computer through E-mail or online chats.

Children involved in Digital Heroes receive a free computer and Internet access from AOL Canada.

The e-mentoring program is like having an electronic pen pal, says Lawson, adding that the relationship can be lasting and special.

Most people have preconceived notions of what it means to be a Big Brother or Big Sister relationship, he says.

“When people hear about BBBSC they think of the traditional program,” Lawson says. “People have boxed us into what we can do.”

The Hamilton agency has roughly eight different programs for volunteer mentors to participate in.

Digital Heroes is administered by BBBSC and Frontier College. The program is expected to expand to different parts of Canada in 2003.

Computers for the project were contributed by RBC Financial Group and CIBC and were upgraded by reBoot Canada. The Ontario’s Promise initiative was responsible for launching the project and formed the partnerships.

AOL Canada is the major sponsor of the project. Jon Hamovitch, vice-president of human resources at AOL says Digital Heroes is a true example of what can be accomplished through partnerships.

“This program brings together technology, innovation, and human spirit to benefit children and youth,” Hamovitch says. “I applaud Ontario’s Promise for their ingenuity and determination to make this program a reality.”

In Hamilton and Burlington, one of the highlights of Digital Heroes is taking children off waiting lists and putting them into e-mentoring relationships, Lawson says.

“When it takes a long time for kids to be matched, they get the message ‘I’m not good enough,'” he says. “Hopefully Digital Heroes gives us another way to say ‘You matter.'”

Lawrence Hill

In book reviews, Culture, Writing (all kinds) on October 20, 2011 at 3:00 AM

Lawrence Hill, Review of BlackBerry, Sweet Juice

Image result for Blackberry, Sweet Juice Lawrence Hill

“The blacker the berry/The sweeter the juice/But if you get too black/It ain’t no use.”

Author Lawrence Hill says his father passed along this saying to him. In his memoir Black Berry, Sweet Juice, On Being Black and White in Canada, Hill tells the story of a young black and white man who developed his identity from two racial worlds in Canada. It’s a revealing tale of how his black father and white mother met, married and had three children. More importantly, it’s about how race has played a factor in his life:

Race becomes an issue as a result of environmental factors. The average white kid growing up in a totally white suburb doesn’t have to think of himself or herself as white. For a huge portion of my childhood, I was very much like that white kid. But gradually, as imperceptibly as the movement of the hour hand around the clock, my environment started talking to me and making me aware that I was different, that I could never truly be white. There’s nothing like being called “nigger” to let you know that you’re not white. It didn’t happen often. But it happened enough to awaken me.

Hill writes that growing up racially different in Don Mills wasn’t easy. However, he still was a privileged child who went to good schools, traveled to such places as Africa and dealt with his multicultural and multiracial extended family.

Lawrence Hill faced many difficulties, but his experience doesn’t seem any different from the life of many black people growing up in Canada. I will take myself as an example.

Hill talks about not knowing if you’re black. Until I was 5, I had no idea that I was black. And I thought my mother was white because she wasn’t the same colour as the rest of our family. Being from the Caribbean, she was lighter. My father is a dark-skinned African.

I grew up in a white suburb as Hill. I was privileged enough to learn French like Hill and travel to Africa.

Hill writes about having hair issues – I wrote my master’s thesis on that. If that’s not an indication of having an issue with my hair, I’m not sure what else could be.

Where the paths differ is that in a black and white existence, passing for white becomes an issue, where that has never been an option for me. Although Hill discusses in his book a passion for embracing his blackness and identifying as black, this becomes particularly fascinating for a man who could pass for white under an undiscerning eye.

I believe many black people could identify with Hill. So why are their story not told, and Hill’s is? There are so few black people published in Canada.

I am so grateful though that Hill mentions in his book since he does have the privilege to get published by Harper-Collins, that he recognizes race as a social construct more than a biological one:

“It’s necessary to probe into the social meanings of race. The book is my attempt to examine the issues of race. [The book is for] anyone who’s interested in examining the core of race and how it’s played out. My existence is the fighting against easy definitions of race.”

Hill’s writing style is similar to the way he speaks. It flows and it has a beat. It’s as easy to follow as an Amanda Marshall song. And it’s good that, as in Marshall’s song Everybody Has a Story, Hill tries to include the stories of other black and white people in his book. There are so many voices not heard. And he admits to this.

Perhaps Hill’s voice can become an echo for others. That would be sweet juice indeed.

Winterize your skin (published on Canoe.ca in 2001)

In Beauty, Business, Writing (all kinds) on October 19, 2011 at 3:00 AM

Image result for Ombrelle cold weather defence

Winterize your skin

Did you know that the sun can cause damage to your skin in the winter, as well as in the summer?

If you said yes, great. For those of you who said no, there can be grave consequences to not using sun protection in the winter. Even more, damage can happen to your skin in winter than in the summer.

“I would say it [my skin] would be drier than in the wintertime. I try to use a moisturizer,” says Jill Serrao, an executive assistant at an accounting firm, like most people she does not use sunblock in the winter.

Using winter sun protection is a routine Canadians have to start getting used to, in order to keep their skin healthy.

Fewer people think of wearing sunblock in winter. Winter winds, UV rays reflected by water, snow, sand or cement can really give you the cold and bruised shoulder.

Vanessa Visard, who works in consumer relations, says, “My basic routine is a good moisturizer once in the morning and at night. I wash my face every day. I don’t have problem skin.”

For many, the solution is not that easy.

Ombrelle Cold Weather Defence, with an SPF of 25 is L’Oreal’s answer to protecting drying winter skin with a sunblock.

It comes in a cream which guards against UV rays and the harsh realities to the skin against outdoor sports, shoveling snow, and walking children home from school.

The formula is also sensitive-proof enough to be used on children’s skin as well.

Yonette Ward, a fashion and interior designer, says the only form of sunblock she uses is a UV-protection gloss on her lips.

The Ombrelle sun protection also has anti-drying agents to lock in the moisture of the skin. It includes ingredients like glycerin, silicon, and fatty alcohol to add the much-needed moisture to winter skin.

“We realized it [the sunblock] was important because of following discussions with doctors and consumers, we need to protect from cold weather aggressions,” says Ombrelle’s Public Relations Manager, Nathalie de Champlain.

The spokeswoman for Ombrelle’s Cold Weather Defence product launch is World Champion freestyle skier Stephanie Sloan. Out on the slopes from the first snowfall she understands the importance of winter sun protection. Her husband who was a Crazy Canuck skier died of malignant melanoma in 1990.

“To me, daily suncare protection has become as necessary and important as a balanced diet or regular physical exercise,” says Sloan. She also adds sun protection is important to her as an anti-aging device.

The new Ombrelle product will be available in November across Canada. Its suggested retail price is $14.49.


Perfume has gone to the dogs (published in Canoe.ca in 2001)

In Beauty, Business, Pets, Writing (all kinds) on October 18, 2011 at 3:00 AM

 

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Perfume has gone to the dogs
Oh, my dog! Now pet owners can get even more intimate with their loved ones by wearing the same perfume with their cat and dog.

Dog Generation Paris has designed the first ever prestige fragrance for dedicated dogs and frisky cats.

The French company offers an eau de toilette spray and a shampoo (“Oh My Dog! Eau de Toilette Spray and Shampoo”) for dogs, and an eau de toilette (“Oh My Cat? Eau de Toilette Spray”) for cats.

Image result for Dog Generation Paris
“Pet lovers may not always admit it, but they often share everything with their canine or feline friends, from their bed pillow to their favourite dish,” says Veronique Viellerobe, public relations for Dog Generation Paris. “Humans can now share and wear the same perfume with their dog or cat.”

The creators of the perfume and shampoo are two former Parfums Givenchy executives, Laurent Jugeau, Etienne de Swardt, and Olivier Echaudemaison.

CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 17 to 21 October 2011‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Technology, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on October 17, 2011 at 3:00 AM

Image result for Broadcasting

CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 17 to 21 October
2011

The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory policies
in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to change
without notice.

Broadcasting decisions:
Application by Jean-Noël Allain, on behalf of a corporation to be
incorporated, http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-336.htm#12 for a broadcasting licence to operate a predominantly
English language community FM radio station in Bouctouche, New Brunswick

Application by Cortes Community Radio Society http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-336.htm#25 for a broadcasting licence
to operate an English-language community FM radio station in Cortes
Island, British Columbia

Application by Bell Aliant Regional Communications, Limited Partnership http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-317.htm
to amend the broadcasting licence for its regional terrestrial service

Application by Bell ExpressVu Limited Partnership http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-317.htm to amend the
broadcasting licence for its video-on-demand service

Application by Peace River Broadcasting Corporation Ltd. http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-353.htm to amend the
broadcasting licence for the radio station CKYL Peace River in order to
operate an FM transmitter in Manning, Alberta

Applications by Coopérative des travailleurs CHNC https://services.crtc.gc.ca/pub/instances-proceedings/Default-Defaut.aspx?S=C&PA=B&PT=PT1&PST=A&Lang=eng
to modify the technical parameters of the French-language commercial radio station CHNC-FM New
Carlisle, as well as those of its transmitters CHNC-FM-1 Carleton and
CHNC-FM-2 Chandler (Quebec)

Telecom Decision:
Bell Aliant Regional Communications, Limited Partnership – Application for
forbearance from the regulation of residential local exchange services
File number: 8640-B54-201111442 http://www.crtc.gc.ca/Part1/eng/2011/8640/b54_201109984.htm

life rattle show no. 1174

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Music, Radio Podcasts, Technology, Writing (all kinds) on October 16, 2011 at 9:49 PM

http://www.liferattle.ca/radio/show1174.html

Totally Unknown Writers Festival at Rivoli on Wednesday Schedule

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Writing (all kinds) on October 16, 2011 at 10:40 AM

2011 Festival Schedule

2011 Festival Invitation

Art for the fifth wall (originally published for New Dreamhomes and Condominiums Magazine)

In Business, Home Decor, Writing (all kinds) on October 12, 2011 at 3:00 AM

by Donna Kakonge

Alan Pourvakil’s accomplishments are luxurious, award-winning, and good for your health. He is the owner and designer of W Studio—a large, impressive building that houses fine carpets.

He was born in Iran, a country famous for its Persian rugs. He came to Canada in 1988 at the age of 20 and started working in the carpet business a year later. He had no experience at the time, but learned about the art of carpet making at the International Academy of Design.

In 1990, he started a rug warehousing business in Richmond Hill and hired a handful of designers. Six years later, he opened his own retail business. He started out selling mainly Persian rugs, but after about a year he realized that people were tired of repetition.

“We looked for things that were softer on the eyes, more open, that would fit into today’s lifestyle, things that were not necessarily made in Iran,” says Pourvakil. “My approach was different; I wanted to find out what someone needed and try to find that carpet. We have to…find out what they like and what is right for the room.”

Pourvakil says each rug has a soul; he calls it art for the fifth wall. “It’s the largest piece of art in a room. It’s the most important piece of art in a room. A carpet can take months, if not years, to be done…It does have lots of personality.

It not only has to reflect the user, it has to be right for the space.”

W Studio seems to be accomplishing its mandate. It has garnered over 30 national and international design awards. Another big project it has been involved in is the expansion of the new Royal Ontario Museum, with an exhibit on China, Korea, Japan, and the First Nations peoples. Pourvakil also been involved with the Textile and Carpet Museum and National Ballet School, and his charity work includes Fashion Cares, Reach for the Rainbow, the Heart and Stroke Foundation, and the Sick Kids Foundation.

Pourvakil has also made several television appearances including on HGTV, Life TV, and CityTV. Pourvakil uses only wool, silk, and cotton in his carpets—no synthetics. “We believe in the air quality of a room,” he says. “Sick buildings are a concern for [us]. It’s a healthy choice and people are so concerned about the air that we breathe. If you have young children you should stay away from broadloom or synthetic fabrics. Also the artistic part of the value is lost. You lose the soul of the rug. This is a craft that has been carried on for thousands of years.”

Nowadays people have a need for a big area rug and Pourvakil says that size is very important. A lot of floors are hardwood, granite, slate, or tile and you need something to cover the space in order to bring life to the room.

One of the most appealing things about carpets is their ability to reduce noise. “You definitely need that,” says Pourvakil. “For many people that’s exactly the reason [they buy a carpet], to reduce sound pollution.”

Pourvakil has high ambitions for his craft. “When I first started out I worked with a PR woman who asked me where you want this company to be, and I said I want this to be the biggest carpet business in the world with locations all over the world,” says Pourvakil.

“Her jaw dropped and she said I have big dreams. Yes, I have big dreams…You can’t mass produce something and expect to be the best. I want to be the best design house and the most socially conscious business.”

MyRoxanne (excerpt)

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Creative Writing, Culture, Uncategorized on October 11, 2011 at 3:00 AM

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Chapter One

 Roxanne has always been attracted to white men. There, she admits it. Maybe it came from watching all those movies and television shows when she was younger, where the good-looking men were always white. But, she does remember being fascinated with the show Fame and thinking Leroy was very sexy. And she does think black men are sexy. But, there’s something about them she has never been able to achieve, and that’s love. Life is hard for black men. And life for black women is even harder. She has never been able to find a black man who compared to her father. That’s why she always fell for the white ones.

Although life is hard for Roxanne, it took a long time for her to recognize her beauty and power as a black woman. She realized it in a small way through various women in her life; first her mother, who she held the family together through all the tough times. Then, there was her first Barbie doll, Christie.

Roxanne was about seven years old and really wanted this green bike from PlayTime Toy store in Don Mills, Ontario. It was one of those banana seat bikes with the large handles. This made it easier for double-riding. Her father finally gave her the money to buy the bicycle, and she went to the toy store with her mother to pick up the bike. Then, she saw Christie…the first black Barbie doll she’d ever seen. She was a “Kissing Barbie” with long curly black hair and wearing a pretty delicately patterned pink dress. Roxanne wanted her instead of the bike, so she used the money her father gave her to buy Christie instead.

When she got home her father found out she had bought a Barbie doll instead of the bike, he hit Roxanne so hard on her bottom that the blow left red welts on her brown butt. He later came to apologize, which she eventually came to accept.

After her parents separated when she was eight years old, there was a lengthy court battle over custody. Her father wanted custody of all the children in the family. But, his secret of being a highly functional alcoholic was revealed in court. Her mother tells Roxanne he stood up in court and defended himself and told the judge that in Africa, his children were his property, and they should be in his custody. The judge told him, well, we are not in Africa, and custody is granted to the mother. Roxanne had mixed feelings. She ended up spending all her weekends visiting her father with her brother and sister.

It was her father’s new house in downtown Toronto where Roxanne met Plum. She escaped the transitional pains of her father learning to live on his own, and meals of boiled chicken and tasteless rice, by hanging out at Plum’s place. Roxanne and Plum would play with her white boy Barbie dolls until playing with them weren’t enough for her. She had to steal them (which now that the story is out, she would like to apologize to Plum). She stole a dark-haired, light-eyed one who she named Todd. Todd and Christie had the kind of love affair Roxanne now had with her husband, who is also dark-haired and light-eyed.

Really it was only her sister who knew about the romance Roxanne had created between Christie and Todd. Sadia would play with Roxanne sometimes. Sometimes Roxanne would play with Sadia too. Now, this is the story of how her playtime became real time.

Global Home Accents Announces New Fall Line of Home Decor Furnishings

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Technology, travel, Writing (all kinds) on October 10, 2011 at 3:00 AM

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Online PR News – 09-October-2011 –Lake Mary, USA: The company has introduced many new exciting home accents for this fall, including soft furnishings and European tapestries. Their range of comfy cushions and beanbag chairs are perfect for snuggling up with your loved one after a lovely evening enjoying the gorgeous show of colourful fall leaves. Lie back with a glass of wine or your favourite drink, and allow yourselves to just relax and enjoy this time of year.

The fabulous floor or table-standing lanterns that Global Home Accents has an offer you will provide warm glowing light to accentuate the yellows, oranges, and browns of fall and really set the season in your home. The company also offers lovely contemporary or carved wooden bowls for your tables that you could fill with seasonal nuts or chocolates.

Speaking of chocolates, Global Home Accents also announce the introduction of their new range of sweets and desserts including Belgian min-truffles, petit fours and mini Ambrosia chocolate tortes – three-layered mini chocolate cakes filled and iced with ganache. Fill a few bowls with these and two of you can relax all evening, enjoying these gorgeous chocolates while you watch the fall sunset disappear over the trees.

With regard to nuts, always-popular table nibbles from fall through winter, the company also offers a range of magnificent nutcrackers, from 10 to 16 inches in height and in many designs, including fall and Christmas designs. These will look fabulous on your table standing overlooking a carved wooden bowl of pecans or filberts.

Don’t forget the garden this fall! Although there is plenty for the birds to eat at this time of the year, it will soon be winter, and now is the time to install one or two of the bird tables and feeders offered by Global Home Accents. These bird feeders come in many styles and are made in the USA. All are rust-proof aluminum so will last and last. They will attract birds of many different types to your garden during the winter. They will reward you in the spring.

Global Home Accents are also announcing the introduction of a range of designer handbags to their fall stock. These are genuine designer handbags, clutches and wristlets by Gucci, Yves Saint Laurent, Fendi and Christian Dior and you can save up to $1800 on a Dior handbag by buying from the Global Home Accents website. These are not only fabulous gifts but also great bargains to buy for yourself!

In fact, fall is the ideal time to be thinking of the holiday season or Christmas, whatever you prefer to call it. Don’t wait until December to buy your gifts because that’s when the prices shoot up. That is a reason for Global Home Accents announcing so many additions to our range at this time: to give our regular and new customers the opportunity to buy at excellent prices now.

Other items that the company is offering at this time of year are luxury board games, specifically luxury sets of backgammon, chess, mahjong, Chinese checkers and Go. These not only look good as home accents sitting on a table but also are excellent gifts for your friends or family.

Finally, back to the desserts and some lovely cakes and gateaux for the holiday season. Global Home Accents announces the introduction of their gourmet range that includes a magnificent Black Forest gateaux and Flourless chocolate torte for the chocoholics. Follow that with a wonderful Boston cream pie or peanut butter fudge cake and you are in seventh heaven! The apple strudel and the birthday cakes are available for the more traditional. These are all genuinely edible, but don’t keep them all just for yourself!

Global Home Accents have a great to offer at this time of year, and their fall additions are available just at the right time. Don’t miss this fabulous website with its exciting home accents and home décor.

Kindle Direct Publishing Now Enables Authors and Publishers to Independently Publish Their Books in the Amazon.fr Kindle Store

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Technology, travel, Writing (all kinds) on October 9, 2011 at 3:00 AM

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Authors and publishers can now earn up to 70% royalty on sales to Kindle customers in France

LUXEMBOURG, Oct 07, 2011 (BUSINESS WIRE) —

(NASDAQ: AMZN)–Amazon.fr today announced that authors and publishers worldwide are now able to make their books available in the Amazon.fr Kindle Store (www.amazon.fr/kindle) using Kindle Direct Publishing (http://kdp.amazon.fr). Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) is a fast, free and easy way for authors and publishers to make their books available to Kindle customers worldwide via Kindle, on the web with Kindle Cloud Reader and on free Kindle reading apps for Android, iPad, iPhone, iPod touch, Windows Phone, PC, and Mac.

Authors and publishers can utilize the new KDP website to make their books available in France, Germany, the UK, US and more than 100 countries worldwide while continuing to own the rights to their books. The popular KDP 70% royalty option is also now available for books sold in France, and people can receive their payment in Euros, British pounds or US dollars. For more information and program terms, please visit http://kdp.amazon.fr.

“Authors and publishers can now reach more readers by using Kindle Direct Publishing to make their books available to French customers in the new Amazon.fr Kindle Store, as well as customers all over the world,” said Greg Greeley, vice president, European Retail. “Authors in many countries have already seen tremendous success with KDP, like American author John Locke who has sold more than 1 million Kindle books using KDP, and we’re happy to bring the program to French authors and publishers.”

The Amazon.fr Kindle Store, which also launched today, serves customers in France, Belgium, Monaco, Luxembourg, and Switzerland. The French Kindle Store offers customers a vast selection of over 35,000 French-language Kindle books, all 28 L’Express best sellers available in digital–the most in France–hundreds of popular graphic novels and over 4,000 free classics in French.

About Amazon.com

Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ: AMZN), a Fortune 500 company based in Seattle, opened on the World Wide Web in July 1995 and today offers Earth’s Biggest Selection. Amazon.com, Inc. seeks to be Earth’s most customer-centric company, where customers can find and discover anything they might want to buy online, and endeavors to offer its customers the lowest possible prices. Amazon.com and other sellers offer millions of unique new, refurbished and used items in categories such as Books; Movies, Music & Games; Digital Downloads; Electronics & Computers; Home & Garden; Toys, Kids & Baby; Grocery; Apparel, Shoes & Jewelry; Health & Beauty; Sports & Outdoors; and Tools, Auto & Industrial. Amazon Web Services provides Amazon’s developer customers with access to in-the-cloud infrastructure services based on Amazon’s own back-end technology platform, which developers can use to enable virtually any type of business. The new latest generation Kindle is the lightest, most compact Kindle ever and features the same 6-inch, most advanced electronic ink display that reads like real paper even in bright sunlight. Kindle Touch is a new addition to the Kindle family with an easy-to-use touch screen that makes it easier than ever to turn pages, search, shop, and take notes – still with all the benefits of the most advanced electronic ink display. Kindle Touch 3G is the top of the line e-reader and offers the same new design and features of Kindle Touch, with the unparalleled added convenience of free 3G. Kindle Fire is the Kindle for movies, TV shows, music, books, magazines, apps, games and web browsing with all the content, free storage in the Amazon Cloud, Whispersync, Amazon Silk (Amazon’s new revolutionary cloud-accelerated web browser), vibrant color touch screen, and powerful dual-core processor.

Amazon and its affiliates operate websites, including http://www.amazon.com, http://www.amazon.co.uk, http://www.amazon.de, http://www.amazon.co.jp, http://www.amazon.fr, http://www.amazon.ca, http://www.amazon.cn, http://www.amazon.it, and http://www.amazon.es. As used herein, “Amazon.com,” “we,” “our” and similar terms include Amazon.com, Inc., and its subsidiaries, unless the context indicates otherwise.

Forward-Looking Statements

This announcement contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Actual results may differ significantly from management’s expectations. These forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that include, among others, risks related to competition, management of growth, new products, services and technologies, potential fluctuations in operating results, international expansion, outcomes of legal proceedings and claims, fulfillment center optimization, seasonality, commercial agreements, acquisitions and strategic transactions, foreign exchange rates, system interruption, inventory, government regulation and taxation, payments and fraud. More information about factors that potentially could affect Amazon.com’s financial results is included in Amazon.com’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including its most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K and subsequent filings.

SOURCE: Amazon.com, Inc.

Amazon.com, Inc.
Media Hotline, 206-266-7180
http://www.amazon.com/pr

Another Africa Play on at Canadian Stage

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Technology, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on October 8, 2011 at 3:00 AM

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STROKE IS URGENT: The Heart and Stroke Foundation 2011 Stroke Report warns stroke awareness is dangerously low among women

In Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Environment, Health, Living, Media Writing, Technology, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on October 6, 2011 at 3:00 AM

Foundation launches free Smartphone apps to help turn the tide for all Canadians

June 01, 2011 @ 12:01AM

Ottawa – The Heart and Stroke Foundation 2011 Stroke Month Report warns that awareness levels of stroke warning signs and stroke prevention is dangerously low among all women, especially among women from Canada’s two largest visible minorities – people of Chinese and South Asian descent.

The Foundation polling found that women are not aware that stroke and heart disease is their leading cause of death:

For Canadian women overall, 53 percent are unable to identify that stroke and heart disease are their leading cause of death − and responsible for one in three deaths.1
For women of Chinese and South Asian origin, 84 percent are unable to identify that stroke and heart disease are their leading cause of death.2

Awareness has improved steadily thanks to the Foundation’s The Heart Truth campaign, which continues to inform and empower women to take action to reduce their risks. Before the campaign started three years ago, 68 percent of women didn’t know stroke and heart disease was their leading cause of death.3

“Heart disease and stroke are the leading cause of death in women,” says Heart and Stroke Foundation spokesperson, Dr. Frank Silver. “The real tragedy is that 80 percent of strokes are preventable, whether you’re a man or a woman.”

Stroke affects women and men of all ages. More than 50,000 strokes occur in Canada every year – one every 10 minutes. About 300,000 Canadians live with the effects of stroke. According to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, more women than men die from stroke annually. In Canada stroke kills 32 percent more women than men.

A previous analysis of Canadian deaths shows that stroke death rates are highest among women of Chinese origin, intermediate among women of South Asian origin, and lowest among women of European origin.

Women need better stroke detectors
Women’s awareness of stroke warning signs is poor. The Foundation poll found that only 53 percent of South Asian women were able to correctly identify at least two of the five warning signs – lower than the overall Canadian average for women of 62 percent.

When asked to identify at least three warning signs, only a third of all women polled could do so.

“Canadian women need to be better stroke detectors,” says Dr. Silver. “We need to do all we can to build awareness of the warning signs and help women reduce their risk from death or disability from stroke.”

HSF poll: women’s awareness of the stroke symptoms/warning signs

Stroke warning sign

Chinese women

*March 2011

South Asian women
*March 2011

All Canadian women
**December 2009

Sudden loss of strength/numbness in face/arm/leg, even if temporary

48

37

50

Sudden difficulty speaking/understanding/confusion, even if temporary

30

24

42

Sudden loss of balance, especially with other signs

27

27

35

Sudden trouble with vision, even if temporary

18

16

28

Sudden severe/unusual headache

15

9

20

Don’t know/No answer

18

22

15

*Environics (March 2011)
** Environics (December 2009)

“Stroke is urgent. Knowing and reacting immediately to stroke warning signs is essential,” says Dr. Silver, who notes that there is a treatment for strokes caused by blood clots, the most common type of stroke. This treatment must be administered within the first few hours of warning signs to be effective. “Canadians must react urgently to the warning signs by calling 9-1-1 or their local emergency number,” says Dr. Silver.

Women underestimate their risk factors when it comes to stroke
Equally concerning, 23 percent of all women could not name even one risk factor for stroke. Only 29 percent of Chinese women and 22 percent of South Asian women identified high blood pressure, which is, in fact, the leading risk factor for stroke.

Women overall also had low awareness of stroke risk factors. For example, only 28 percent recognized high blood pressure as a risk factor and only 20 percent identified high cholesterol.

Following a lower-sodium diet and controlling high blood pressure, being physically active and smoke-free can significantly reduce stroke risk.

“The very face of our communities is changing. Heart disease and stroke are increasingly crossing age, gender, and ethnic lines,” says Dr. Silver. “It’s important that Canadians of all ethnic backgrounds be aware of how to prevent stroke.”

HSF poll: women’s awareness of the stroke risk factors

Stroke risk factor

Chinese women

*March 2011

South Asian women
*March 2011

All Canadian women
**December 2009

High blood pressure (hypertension)

29

22

28

Smoking

9

9

23

High cholesterol levels

24

19

20

Obesity

12

12

15

Stress

11

25

11

Family history

16

5

11

Physical inactivity

22

15

9

Age

7

1

6

Heart disease

4

5

5

Diabetes

7

8

4

Excessive alcohol consumption

4

6

4

Don’t know/No answer

16

20

23

*Environics (March 2011)
** Environics (December 2009)

There was even lower awareness of the other risk factors of stroke (gender, ethnicity, and personal history of stroke or TIA).

Foundation launches two-stroke apps to help Canadians lower their risk

To help all Canadians lower their risk for stroke, the Heart and Stroke Foundation created two new free Smartphone apps that will allow them to make simple lifestyle changes – wherever they are.

“The digital age has created a new avenue for healthcare – and the Foundation is embracing the technology to support the health of Canadians,” says Dr. Marco Di Buono, spokesperson for the Foundation. “With a continued focus on reducing all risks, we can stop strokes from robbing us of valuable, quality years of life.”

The My Heart&Stroke Health Check Recipe Helper Smartphone app

By eating a diet that is lower in sodium, Canadians can prevent and control high blood pressure, the number one cause of stroke. The new My Heart&Stroke Health Check Recipe Helper app provides Canadians with a quick and easy resource to help lower the amount of sodium (salt) in their diets. The app features dozens of heart-healthy, lower-sodium recipes that come with grocery lists, main ingredient searches, and comprehensive nutrition information. Health Check™ is one way the Foundation helps Canadians make healthy choices and is based on Canada’s Food Guide.

A 2007 Heart and Stroke Foundation and Canadian Stroke Network study showed that reducing salt intake by half would eliminate high blood pressure in one million Canadians.

“Our Health Check registered dietitians selected these recipes based on strict criteria for the amount of sodium and fat content,” says Dr. Di Buono. “Canadians can trust that the recipes are healthy.” The recipes include a variety of options for salad, soup, vegetarian, meat, poultry, and seafood meals.

With the app, Canadians can create a grocery shopping list and rate their favourite recipes. It will be regularly updated with new recipes and features.

The My Heart&Stroke Blood Pressure Action Plan app

“High blood pressure − which is the leading cause of stroke − affects six million Canadians, and is known as the silent killer because of its lack of symptoms,” says Dr. Silver. “The good news is that with proper diagnosis and treatment of high blood pressure, you can cut your risk of stroke by up to 40 percent.”

Developed by Foundation experts, the My Heart&Stroke Blood Pressure Action Plan app allows users to monitor and better manage their blood pressure. They will be able to assess their personal risk, track blood pressure readings over time, view graphs of blood pressure changes, share readings with their physicians, list their medications, set appointment reminders, and track their condition.

“The bottom line is that awareness of your risks, of the warning signs, and of prevention and treatment options are your best defences against stroke,” says Dr. Di Buono.

The free apps – which are available in English or French − can be downloaded at the Apple, Android, and BlackBerry app stores. Or Canadians can go to http://www.heartandstroke.ca/mobileapps.

Heart and Stroke Foundation helps Canadians turn the tide on stroke

The Heart and Stroke Foundation is a committed leader in stroke research, health promotion, and advocacy. The Foundation works on many fronts to help all Canadians live longer, healthier lives:

The Heart Truth
The Foundation’s The Heart Truth™ campaign educates women about identifying their risks and warning signs of heart disease and stroke. It provides women with the tools they need to take charge of their heart health: women can significantly reduce their risk — by as much as 80 percent — by making simple lifestyle changes. (thehearttruth.ca)

A Canadian vision for stroke care
The Canadian Stroke Strategy is a joint initiative of the Heart and Stroke Foundation and the Canadian Stroke Network designed to support an integrated approach to stroke awareness, prevention, access to treatment, rehabilitation, and community reintegration in every province and territory. The Canadian Stroke Network fosters collaboration between more than 100 of Canada’s leading scientists and clinicians from 24 universities. This strategy is already saving countless lives, while also having a remarkable influence on secondary stroke prevention and recovery.

Multicultural HSF resources
Chinese is now the number three language in Canada – right after English and French. The new HSF poll found that over 80 percent of Chinese and South Asian women were interested in stroke and heart disease information geared to them. Eighty-one percent of Chinese women and 78 percent of South Asian women said it would be useful to have this information their languages. The Heart and Stroke Foundation has health resources in Cantonese, Mandarin, Hindi, Punjabi, Tamil, and Urdu to meet this need. Go to heartandstroke.ca/multicultural for more information.

A quivering heartbeat away from stroke
This year, the Foundation put the focus on a risk factor for stroke: atrial fibrillation. This condition causes an irregular heartbeat and increases the risk for ischemic stroke – stroke caused by a blood clot – by three to five times. It is estimated that up to 15 percent of all strokes are due to atrial fibrillation.

Focusing on stroke research
The research initiative Focus on Stroke encourages new researchers and health professionals to train in the field of stroke and supports newly established investigators. Celebrated as one of the country’s leading research partnerships, the Heart and Stroke Foundation and the Canadian Stroke Network received the first ever CIHR Partnership Award for this initiative in 2002.

Stroke knowledge saves lives
Recognizing stroke warning signs and getting immediate medical attention have a major impact on survival and recovery. The Foundation recently launched its Stroke is an Urgent awareness campaign to help Canadians recognize warning signs and how to react to this medical emergency.

1. This poll was conducted by Harris/Decima via teleVox, the company’s national telephone omnibus. A total of 1,013 Canadian women were surveyed from March 31st to April 10th, 2011. Results are accurate to within +/- 3.1% 19 times out of 20.

2. This poll was conducted by Environics Research Group. This telephone poll was conducted between March 16-31, 2011. A total of 255 South Asian and 245 Chinese women were surveyed. The findings can be considered accurate to within plus or minus 6.3%, 19 times out of 20.

3. This poll was conducted by Harris/Decima via teleVox, the company’s national telephone omnibus. A total of 1,023 Canadian women were surveyed from December 6th to 17th, 2007. Results are accurate to within +/- 3.1% 19 times out of 20.
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The Heart and Stroke Foundation, a volunteer-based health charity, leads in eliminating heart disease and stroke and reducing their impact through the advancement of research and its application, the promotion of healthy living, and advocacy. (heartandstroke.ca)

October is Lupus Awareness Month… yet lupus remains under-recognized and under-funded

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Writing (all kinds) on October 5, 2011 at 3:00 AM

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October 04, 2011 @ 10:00AM

Markham, ON – The first new treatment in 50 years has brought increased awareness across Canada of Lupus and its impact on patients and their families. This is great news for Lupus Canada and its provincial partners as we work towards a vision of life without Lupus. Known as ‘The Disease with 1000 Faces”, lupus affects tens of thousands of Canadian men, women, and children. In October, lupus patients and supporters across Canada will recognize Lupus Awareness Month as a time to reflect on what all Canadians can do to increase awareness of this under-recognized and under-funded disease.

Lupus affects over 1:1000 Canadian men, women and children, yet many people are still unaware of the disease. Between the ages of 15 and 45 though, 9 times more women than men will be diagnosed with lupus. Its symptoms often mimic other illnesses, and it can attack any tissue or organ in the body. Common symptoms of lupus include joint pain, skin rashes, sun sensitivity, extreme fatigue, fever, chest pain and hair loss. It is a chronic autoimmune disease that is life threatening and life altering and for which there is no cure. For this reason, Lupus Awareness Month is a critical way to help people.

Lupus Canada, working together with its provincial partners, is a national voluntary organization dedicated to improving the lives of people living with lupus through advocacy, education, public awareness, support, and research. We provide educational and support resources for people whose lives are touched by lupus, raise awareness of Lupus and provide funding for research. Through the support of events such as Walk for Lupus and generous, engaged individual and corporate donors, we are able to continue our work on behalf of people living with lupus.

To learn more about lupus, Lupus Canada, our member organizations and divisions, please visit http://www.lupuscanada.org or call 1(800) 661-1468.

Lack of affordable housing gives Calgary vast majority of Alberta’s homeless

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Writing (all kinds) on October 4, 2011 at 3:00 AM

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Study examines causes of homelessness rates in province’s two major cities

September 29, 2011 @ 11:20AM

New research released today by The School of Public Policy finds that Alberta’s homeless population is disproportionately concentrated in Calgary.

Authored by Ronald Kneebone, Herb Emery, and Oksana Grynishak, the study measures homeless shelter usage across the province in 2009. Despite Edmonton and Calgary being similar in total population, 63 percent of all shelter use in the province was in Calgary while only 28 percent was in the provincial capital.

As for the causes of this large gap, the authors pinpoint three economic factors: the supply of rental accommodation, the state of the labour market and the rate of in-migration.

However, the authors argue that the overriding factor is the supply of rental accommodation or affordable housing.

As Calgary’s labour market expands, more and more people are attracted to the city, therefore increasing the demand for rental accommodation. Data used in the study indicates that there are 38 rental units per 1,000 people in Calgary.

“With a small and falling supply of rental accommodations and the local housing market’s failure to expand supply, this results in upward pressure on shelter use,” the authors write.

Meanwhile, in Edmonton, there is a larger supply of affordable housing at 86 units per 1,000 people. The authors argue this allows the city to adjust more easily to in-migration and curtails their homelessness numbers.

The authors note with concern the possibility that the recent fall in shelter use is due to the recent slowdown in the Calgary economy and that shelter use will increase again when the economy recovers.

Therefore, the authors recommend that ways be found “to engage the energy and efficiency of the private sector” to increase the supply of rental accommodations in Calgary. In this way, shelter use might permanently be reduced. Based on previous research by The School of Public Policy, possible measures could include implementing a housing tax credit modeled on the US Low Income Housing Tax Credit; relaxing current rules for investors in multi-unit rental buildings on the use of the capital cost allowance when there is a rental loss; and controls on demolition and condominium conversions.

The paper can be found at http://policyschool.ucalgary.ca/publications

Destigmatizing Mental Illness: Mental Illness Awareness Week October 2-8, 2011

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Writing (all kinds) on October 3, 2011 at 6:26 PM

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Canadian Alliance on Mental Illness and Mental Health promotes mental illness awareness, announces recipients of Ninth Annual Champions of Mental Health Awards

September 30, 2011 @ 08:00AM

Ottawa, ON – The Canadian Alliance on Mental Illness and Mental Health (CAMIMH) is getting ready to kick-off Mental Illness Awareness Week 2011 on October 2rd – a week dedicated to raising awareness of the level of mental illness in Canada and reducing the stigma associated with mental health issues.

“Although we have come a long way since this campaign started almost 20 years ago, the stigma of mental illness persists,” said CAMIMH Chair Dr. John Higenbottam. “Through this campaign, CAMIMH celebrates those with the courage to speak out about their experiences with mental illness and acknowledges the great work being done by individuals and organizations across the country to advance the cause.”

Each year during MIAW, CAMIMH hosts the Champions of Mental Health Awards. The awards will be presented to five distinguished leaders in the mental health field at a gala event held at the Westin Hotel in Ottawa on October 5th. The theme of the 2011 event is sharing and collaboration. Champions have spoken openly about their own experiences, advocated for much-needed research, and supported programs encouraging diagnosis, treatment, and care for those affected by mental illness across Canada.

The 2011 Champions of Mental Health are:

Hon. Lisa Raitt, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Labour
2011 Champion of Mental Health, Public Sector

George Cope
President and CEO, Bell Canada and BCE Inc.
2011 Champion of Mental Health, Private Sector

Dr. Martin Antony
Chair, Department of Psychology, Ryerson University
2011 Champion of Mental Health, Research

AMI-Quebec
2011 Champion of Mental Health, Community (Organization)

David Granirer
Founder, Stand Up For Mental Health
2011 Champion of Mental Health, Community (Individual)

CAMIMH’s year-long Face Mental Illness campaign shares inspirational stories of Canadians from coast-to-coast affected by mental illness. Campaign materials were distributed in English and French to thousands of organizations across Canada. These materials feature the five “Faces of Mental Illness”, selected to share their exceptional stories of recovery. They are:

Harmony Brown, a public speaker, mental health advocate and non-profit housing employee from Toronto, Ontario; Jeremy Bennett, an author, professional speaker and television personality from St. John’s, Newfoundland; Roberta Price, a mother, grandmother, and member of the Coast Salish Peoples in Richmond, British Columbia; Shana Calixte, who is completing her PhD in Women’s Studies at York University, is the leader of a community organization, and a loving partner and parent from Sudbury, Ontario; and Steeve Hurdle, a support worker at a homeless shelter in Sherbrooke, Québec.

“Our Faces demonstrate that it is possible to overcome the challenges associated with mental health issues and lead full, rewarding and productive lives”, said MIAW 2011 Chair, Dr. Pamela Forsythe. “These individuals are truly exceptional, and help spread the campaign’s message to all Canadians that Recovery is Possible.”
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About Mental Illness Awareness Week
Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW) was established in 1992 by the Canadian Psychiatric Association to raise awareness of the level of mental illness in Canada, reduce the stigma attached to mental illness, and promote the positive effects of best practice in prevention, diagnosis and medical treatment. Since that time, participation has grown to include not only other professional associations but also community groups, primary care facilities, educational institutions, family support centres and individuals. For more information on MIAW, please visit http://www.miaw-ssmm.ca.

About MIAW Sponsors
Mental Illness Awareness Week and the Champions of Mental Health Awards cannot take place without the support of dedicated sponsors. They are Bell, Fleishman-Hillard Canada, Lundbeck Canada, Janssen, Lilly, Bristol-Myer Squibb and Rx&D.

Come to Rivoli on Oct. 19th

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Writing (all kinds) on October 2, 2011 at 6:02 PM

Be there at the Rivoli on October 19, 2011, for the Totally Unknown Writers Festival. See you soon!

CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 3 to 7 October 2011‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Technology, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on October 1, 2011 at 3:00 AM

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CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 3 to 7 October
2011
The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory policies
in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to change
without notice.

Broadcasting decisions:
Applications by Telelatino Network Inc. for broadcasting licences to
operate national, niche third-language ethnic Category B specialty
services All Spanish Children’s Television http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-336.htm#9
and All Italian Children’s Television http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-336.htm#10

Application by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC)https://services.crtc.gc.ca/pub/instances-proceedings/Default-Defaut.aspx?S=C&PA=B&PT=PT1&PST=A&Lang=eng to change the
technical parameters of the English-language digital television station
CBET-DT Windsor

Application by TELUS Communications Company https://services.crtc.gc.ca/pub/instances-proceedings/Default-Defaut.aspx?S=C&PA=B&PT=PT1&PST=A&Lang=eng to add Gone Viral TV to the
list of non-Canadian programming services authorized for distribution

Application by Golden West Broadcasting Ltd. http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-96.htm to modify the technical
parameters of the English-language specialty Christian FM radio station
CFEQ FM Winnipeg

Broadcasting and Telecom report:
Results of the fact-finding exercise on over-the-top programming services
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-344.htm

Telecom Decision:
No decision

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