UTSC-Centennial College Online Stories


Danger to Pedestrians in Toronto – Photo Courtesy of Dreamstime.com

Online Stories - Seventh Three - January 25, 2010

Sarah DeMille
Online Story
01/19/10

In the past seven days, Toronto has been witness to the deaths of eight pedestrians due to traffic-related accidents. The cause of four of these accidents was determined to be vehicles making careless turns. Another accident was caused by a driver running a red light, and yet another was the result of a supposedly confusing intersection.

Pedestrian related accidents comprised almost two-thirds of all road deaths in Toronto last year, 31 individuals were killed, meaning that pedestrian death occurred more than three times the rate of passenger deaths.

President of the Ontario Safety League, Brian Patterson, told the Toronto Star that this recent spike in pedestrian related accidents can be attributed to a combination of factors such as reckless driving and a general inattentiveness among both drivers and pedestrians.

The Star also spoke with Toronto police Constable Hugh Smith, who noted that the crowded state of the city’s population, combined with the citizens’ growing trend of sound-blocking earphones and vision-inhibiting headwear, has made the problem of distracted drivers all the more dangerous for pedestrians.

Negotiations to Prevent College Strike – Photo Courtesy of Dreamstime.com

Sarah Moore
Online Story 1

Online Stories - Sixth Three - January 25, 2010

Community college students across Ontario are growing weary of the fact that they may be facing canceled classes as early as February of this year.

Eighteen out of 24 Ontario community colleges across the province voted in favour of a strike last Wednesday if further negotiations prove to be unsuccessful.

Although teachers may argue that many of the conditions they are fighting for will benefit students, the negative effects that the loss of class time will have on those students tend to go overlooked.

It is all well and good for the teachers to negotiate on the issue of a possible strike, but why are the voices of the students who face loss of class time and a disruption of their year not heard?

Despite promises that every effort will be made to ensure that their year will not be lost if a teacher strike does occur, the repercussions of last year’s strike at York University still looms in the minds of concern students.

The issues in play are workload and academic freedom as well as disputing the decision made in November that allows management to impose an offer on teachers without putting it to a vote.

In the instance that a strike occurs, over 200,000 students may potentially be on a less than welcome “break” from classes.

Source: CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/ottawa/story/2010/01/13/ontario-college-strike-vote.html

Tasty Whole Wheat Pasta on a Spoon – Photo Courtesy of Dreamstime.com

Online Stories - Second Three - January 24, 2010

Sarina Adamo
Whole Wheat vs. White Pasta

Marco Polo may have discovered it, but health gurus have refined it in recent years. The whole wheat pasta craze has hit the supermarket shelves and our stomachs as the world becomes increasingly health conscious.

Whole wheat pasta is one of the first steps to reducing the many carbohydrates in satisfying Italian dishes. Growing up, pasta was the main staple in my diet and the whole wheat choice (or ‘the imposter’ as I called it) was not an option. However, as my metabolism slows with age, the benefits of the healthier choice are plentiful and more intriguing.

For those trying to cut down calories, by watching their sugar intake whole wheat is the way to go. As read in an article by ezinemagazine.com, it uses the whole grain rather than processing it down into bleached flour. It contains fibre, less sugar and more protein which leads to a more satisfying diet and ‘fuller’ feeling. You will end up eating less and digesting better nutrients which white pasta does not provide.

I, who was once a skeptic can admit that, if covered with enough fresh tomato sauce, had neglected to notice the difference in taste.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: