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Posts Tagged ‘Canadian Radio-television Telecommunications Commission’

CRTC lowering rates for Internet services in northern Canada‏

In Writing (all kinds) on July 2, 2015 at 3:00 AM
March 4, 2015 – Ottawa-Gatineau – Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) today required Northwestel to lower the rates for certain residential Internet services by 10% to 30%. Northern Canadians who are clients of Northwestel could see a significant reduction applied to their monthly bills by May 4, 2015.

As a result of the CRTC's decision, Northwestel will be required to reduce its rates for residential low-speed Internet connections over a Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) named DSL Internet Lite and DSL Internet 2 by 10%. Similarly, the company's rates for residential DSL Internet services featuring download speeds of 5 and 15 megabits per second named DSL Internet 5 and DSL Internet 15 will be required to come down by 30%. Northwestel will not be able to increase any residential Internet rates until the end of 2017 at the earliest, and will need to seek the CRTC's permission before doing so.

In addition, Northwestel will no longer be allowed to charge additional fees to customers who subscribe to Internet services on their own, rather than as part of a bundle with telephone service. This change will also take effect no later than May 4, 2015.

Finally, the CRTC is taking action to limit additional charges for Northwestel's residential customers who go over the usage allowance already included in their Internet data plans. As of February 2016, Northwestel must lower its charges for additional data usage by at least $0.50 per gigabyte.

In 2013, the CRTC found that there was limited competition in the market for retail Internet services offered using terrestrial facilities. Consequently, the CRTC decided that it would begin to regulate, on an exceptional basis, Northwestel's rates for these services.

With this decision, the CRTC is continuing to ensure that Canadians in Northwestel's operating territory, including those in many small and remote communities, can participate in the digital economy and contribute to the North's economic development.

The CRTC will initiate a major proceeding in the coming months to review basic telecommunication services in Canada in order to improve access to advanced and competitive communications services for all Canadians.


Quick facts

- The CRTC is directing Northwestel to lower its rates for certain residential Internet services by 10% to 30%.
- These new rates must be effective no later than May 4, 2015, and Northwestel will not be able to increase them until the end of 2017 at the earliest.
- The CRTC is directing Northwestel to reduce its additional data usage charges and to stop applying additional fees for stand-alone Internet services.
- The CRTC is ensuring that Canadians that live in northern and remote areas of the country can participate in the digital economy and contribute to their region's economic development.
- The CRTC will initiate a major proceeding in the coming months to review basic telecommunication services in Canada in order to improve access to advanced and competitive communications services for all Canadians.


Quote

"Although we recognize the exceptional situation that exists in Northwestel's territory, we must not let these challenges hinder the development and affordability of telecommunications services in the North. Access to reasonably priced Internet services plays an essential role in the North's economic and social development. With this decision, we are reducing the gap between what consumers pay for Internet services in the northern and southern parts of Canada."

Jean-Pierre Blais, Chairman of the CRTC


Related links

Telecom Decision 2015-78
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2015/2015-78.htm

Telecom Regulatory Policy 2013-711
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2013/2013-711.htm

Telecom Decision 2014-379
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2014/2014-379.htm

News release: CRTC acting to improve telecommunications services for northern Canadians (December 18, 2013)
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/com100/2013/r131218.htm


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Contacts

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https://services.crtc.gc.ca/pub/rapidsccm/Default-Defaut.aspx

This document is available in alternative format upon request.

 

Bill C-43, the Economic Action Plan Act, No. 2, recently received Royal Assent. Some of the amendments adopted by Parliament grant new tools and responsibilities to the CRTC.

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on May 5, 2015 at 3:00 AM
In particular, the CRTC can now issue monetary penalties to any company or person that violates the Telecommunications Act as well as related CRTC decisions or regulations. Monetary penalties are an addition to our toolkit. They will promote compliance with telecommunications laws and regulations. This will ensure Canadians have access to a world-class communication system—one in which there is sustainable competition and a choice of innovative content and services.

Monetary penalties also give the CRTC greater flexibility to tailor its enforcement approach to each situation and to the facts before it. In some cases, a monetary penalty might be the right approach. We will be providing further guidance in the coming weeks on how and when the CRTC intends to use this new power.

Changes to the Telecommunications Act and Broadcasting Act, under Bill C-43, have also prohibited providers from charging customers a fee to receive paper bills for wireless, Internet, telephone and television services. This includes undertakings that the CRTC has exempted from holding a broadcasting licence.

We are, however, conscious that some service providers may need to update their billing systems to automatically remove these charges. In the meantime, the Commission will consider operators to be in compliance if they manually make adjustments to customer bills in the earliest available billing cycle, through rebates or otherwise, thus reversing charges for paper bills. We encourage providers to work proactively with their customers to ensure the most efficient transition to implement this new legislative requirement.

The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory policies

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on February 6, 2015 at 3:00 AM
The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory
policies
in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to
change without notice.

Broadcasting Decisions: 

Application by United Christian Broadcasters Canada for a broadcasting
licence to operate an English-language specialty FM radio station in
Windsor, Ontario http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2014/2014-189.htm#bm4

Application by Eternacom Inc. to renew the broadcasting licence for the
English-language specialty radio station CJTK-FM-3 Elliot Lake
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2014/2014-544.htm

Application by Cobequid Radio Society to operate an English-language
community FM radio station in Lower Sackville, Nova Scotia
https://services.crtc.gc.ca/pub/instances-proceedings/Default-Defaut.aspx?Lang=e&YA=2014&S=C&PA=b&PT=PT1&PST=a#201406067

Telecom Decision:

Final 2014 revenue-percent charge and related matters
File number: 8695-C12-201402685 http://www.crtc.gc.ca/otf/eng/2014/8695/c12_201402685.htm

 

CRTC recognized for its creative and innovative work on behalf of Canadians‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on October 14, 2014 at 3:00 AM
September 16, 2014 – Ottawa-Gatineau – Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)

At a ceremony held today at Rideau Hall, employees of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) were honoured with the Public Service Awards of Excellence. The CRTC was recognized in the areas of Official Languages, Employment Equity and Diversity, and Policy. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC issues 2014 report on state of Canadian broadcasting industry‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on October 12, 2014 at 3:00 AM

September 4, 2014 – Ottawa-Gatineau – Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)
today released information on the broadcasting sector from the 2014
Communications Monitoring Report.

The latest edition of this annual report indicates that Canadians are
watching television programming across multiple platforms. This resulted
in a modest increase in the overall average number of weekly television
viewing hours. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC Publishes a Citizen’s Guide to Participating‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on October 11, 2014 at 3:00 AM

September 2, 2014 – Ottawa-Gatineau – Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)
published It’s Your CRTC! Your 5-minute Guide to Understanding and
Participating in Our Activities to inform Canadians about how to
participate in its activities and proceedings and why that’s important. Read the rest of this entry »

Last chance for Canadians to have their say on the future of television in Canada: Let’s Talk TV!‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on September 15, 2014 at 3:00 AM

Last chance for Canadians to have their say on the future of
television in Canada: Let’s Talk TV!

August 21, 2014 – Ottawa-Gatineau – Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)
today launched an online discussion forum
(http://consultation.crtc.gc.ca/en/consultation/19/help-shape-future-tv-canada)
for Canadians to have their final say on the future of the television
system. The forum will be open until September 19 – the final day of the
public hearing on Let’s Talk TV: A Conversation with Canadians. Read the rest of this entry »

Chairman Jean-Pierre Blais speech on how the CRTC is improving the security and safety of Canadians given at the Economic Club of Canada

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on September 4, 2014 at 3:00 AM
Toronto, Ontario
June 26, 2014
 
Jean-Pierre Blais, Chairman
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
 
Check against delivery
 
Thank you for your kind words of introduction. I am flattered to have been
invited to meet with you, given the Economic Club of Canada’s envious
reputation as the “National Podium of Record.”
 
I welcome this opportunity to go on the public record about an issue that
matters not only to those of you in this audience, but to all Canadians.
 
No, I’m not talking about the Let’s Talk TV conversation we have been
engaged in since last fall – although the future of television in this
country is certainly of great interest to Canadians and the broadcast
sector alike. Our public hearing on Let’s Talk TV kicks off on September
8th.
 
Perhaps you came here this morning expecting an update on our review of
the mobile wireless services market – another important subject for
Canadians and the telecom sector. Our hearing on this issue gets underway
on September 29th. However, that’s not the subject of my talk today
either.
 
Neither am I here to discuss fibre-to-the-home and the need to reinvest in
our telecommunications networks. We’ve scheduled a hearing on wholesale
telecommunications services for November 24th.
 
All three hearings go to the heart of the economics of the $60 billion
communication sector in Canada – but that will be a discussion for another
day.
 
Instead, I want to talk about how the CRTC is fundamentally transforming
to respond to the impacts of the technological changes taking place in
these sectors.
 
Life in a digital world
 
We live in a time when our communication system has become a lifeline for
most of us. Powerful digital communication devices and services are
ever-present in our lives. They bring entertainment, information and
business tools—wherever Canadians live and work. 
 
They provide unprecedented connectivity to friends, family, colleagues,
governments, businesses and customers. Wherever we are. From cars to
classrooms, from buses to boardrooms and from living rooms to sports
fields.
 
And, in a very real way, the regulatory presence of the CRTC accompanies
those communication devices and services. In fact, I sometimes say that,
to the extent that Canadians bring their radios, televisions, telephones,
smartphones and tablets to bed—as many of us do—the CRTC is one of the
rare government institutions that IS in the bedrooms of the nation!
 
We can joke about it but, the fact is, technology is now an integral and
ubiquitous part of our daily lives. This reality brings with it new
responsibilities for the federal regulator. Just as the world of
communications is changing, so must we. And that’s what I want to focus on
this morning.
 
Because, as the respected U.S. jurist, Francis T. Murphy, once remarked,
 
“No more essential duty of government exists than the protection of the
lives of its people. Fail in this, and we fail in everything.”
 
Protecting the public interest
 
People tend to think of the CRTC in terms of broadcasting and
telecommunications—ensuring Canadians have access to a world-class
communication system.
 
It’s true that much of our work revolves around making sure Canadians can
access compelling broadcasting content from diverse sources and on a
variety of platforms. And that they can connect to high-quality and
innovative communication services at affordable prices.
 
But there is another, equally important part of our work that extends
beyond addressing the needs of content creators and consumers.
 
That’s our responsibility to protect the public interest for all
citizens—to harness technology’s potential to do good and to minimize its
power to do harm.
 
There are few jobs, few sectors and few aspects of our lives that remain
untouched by digital technologies. Therefore, the integrity of the system
must be continually maintained and enhanced.
 
It’s our job to make sure citizens can enjoy peace and quiet in their
homes and a more secure online world. This means making sure the telephone
calls they receive are from legitimate telemarketers who follow the rules.
And that they can open their email without having their identity or
intellectual property stolen.
 
We also ensure citizens can connect to a 9-1-1 call centre in an emergency
and receive assistance or timely warnings, such as when severe weather is
expected.
 
Evolving role
 
This is a role we don’t take lightly at the CRTC. Neither does the federal
government, which has introduced new legislation to protect the public
interest.
 
Parliament has updated the CRTC’s mandate with initiatives like the
National Do Not Call List and Canada’s anti-spam legislation. The recently
passed Fair Elections Act also gives us the authority to establish a voter
contact registry.
 
These changing responsibilities are altering our organization. Gone are
the days when our jobs centred on issuing broadcasting licences, setting
policy frameworks and reviewing ownership changes.
 
When I worked in the CRTC’s Legal sector in the 1990s, we had to review
and approve tariff applications for virtually all telephone services. We
were also heavily involved in the regulation of television and radio
services.
 
Today, the majority of the retail telecommunications services used by
Canadians have been deregulated because healthy competition in the
marketplace replaces the need for regulatory interference. All retail
telecommunications services brought in total revenues of about $40 billion
last year. Over 90% of that amount now derives from deregulated retail
services.
 
We still develop policies and regulations, of course. But our enforcement
officers are just as likely to knock on the door of a duct cleaning
company or robocall firm to conduct an on-site inspection. They have
shields and uniforms. And they utilize cutting-edge investigation
techniques to serve and protect Canadians.
 
New powers
 
The CRTC has a range of tools as its disposal to ensure compliance with
the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules, the voter contact registry and
Canada’s anti-spam legislation. These include investigative powers,
preservation demands and warrants, information sharing with partners to
assist investigations and the powers to impose heavy administrative
monetary penalties.
 
Anyone questioning why the Commission would need such powers needs only
consider that there are now apps to disclose the private telephone numbers
of women’s shelters to known abusers of their residents. 
 
A respected business’s reputation can be destroyed when irate customers
mistakenly believe they are being harassed by the firm. That’s what can
happen when callers conceal their true identity by using someone else’s
legitimate phone number—a practice known as caller ID spoofing.
 
More damaging is the handiwork of malware disseminators and phishers, many
operating offshore. They can clean out a Canadian’s bank account by
discreetly capturing key strokes or with convincing e-mails that lead an
unsuspecting person to think they’re dealing with their neighbourhood
financial institution.
 
There is clearly a time and place for government to step up to protect
citizens’ health and safety and the security of Canada’s economy. If
governments do not act, public confidence in the communication system
risks being undermined. Would you not be tempted to unplug your phone if
eight out of 10 calls you receive are unsolicited telemarketing calls?
 
The CRTC is well on its way to implementing a framework to uphold
Canadians’ right to peace and privacy in their homes, undisturbed by
unwanted calls. To give people confidence they can safely work, shop and
communicate online because the digital environment is secure and reliable.
And to make Canadians safer in times of emergency.
 
National DNCL
 
The National Do Not Call List is a perfect illustration of both the CRTC’s
new role and how quickly things are changing in the world of technology.
And how challenging it is to stay on top of it. While not life
threatening, telemarketers’ ploys can do serious damage.
 
As you likely know, Canadians who sign up for this service have made a
deliberate choice to not receive unsolicited telemarketing calls.
 
Canadians have registered more than 12 million numbers on the list. That’s
about 29% of Canadian households. They continue to do so at a rate of
1,200 new numbers a day.
 
I’m happy to reiterate yesterday’s announcement that all registrations to
the National Do Not Call List are now permanent. Canadians no longer have
to worry about having their registration expire and their phones lines
unexpectedly flooded with telemarketing calls.
 
More than 10,000 telemarketers subscribe to the list too—not only from
Canada, but also the United States, India and other countries.
 
It’s important to keep in mind that certain groups are exempted from the
List, such as registered charities, political parties and companies
conducting surveys or selling newspapers.
 
There’s a reason for this. We must not eliminate these sectors’ ability to
communicate with the public or deny them freedom of expression. This is
essential in a democratic society. That said, these groups are
nevertheless obliged to have—and respect—internal do-not-call lists.
 
The legislation sought to strike a balance between the interests of
telemarketers and the privacy of Canadians—something we strive to do in
all of our deliberations at the CRTC.
 
When telemarketers fail to respect the privacy of Canadians, the
Commission can investigate and take action. To date, we have levied nearly
$4 million in penalties from telemarketers that violated the Unsolicited
Telemarketing Rules.
 
We have engaged in more than 1,200 investigations. And we have issued
numerous citations, compliance letters and notices of violation.
 
In 2013-2014 alone, we took enforcement actions against telemarketers
responsible for over 11 million calls to Canadians that were in violation
of the rules.
 
Now, I realize that sounds like a lot of calls. And I know that some
people consider it a failure if just one annoying call gets through. To
them, a telemarketing call is not just a dinner-time disturbance. It is an
invasion of their privacy. Canadians who register their numbers fully
expect they won’t be bothered anymore.
 
But the reality is, Canadians were spared from calls they would have
received were they not registered on the National Do Not Call List. A
survey conducted by the Marketing Research Intelligence Association in
2012 found 78% of people on the list reported receiving fewer calls. So
much for the urban legend that people get more calls now than before
signing up.
 
Between the exemptions built into the legislation and the rogue
telemarketers who ignore the rules, we will never be at a point where
there are zero unsolicited calls. We need to make sure we set realistic
expectations for the National Do Not Call List.
 
Malicious telemarketers are especially problematic. They exploit
vulnerabilities in the system to hide their identities and call Canadians
repeatedly at all hours. Sometimes, these callers attempt to deceive them
to obtain their credit card information or to sell people ineffective or
useless services.
 
We get countless calls and emails from frustrated Canadians who are at
their wit’s end. Even the most meek, mild and polite Canadians have had
enough.
 
Here’s an example of a note I received from Elizabeth in Barrie, Ontario:
 
“We get a "DAILY" harassment phone call from a duct cleaning company. We
have informed them we are on the do not call list, we have asked them not
to call, politely and not so politely. We have threatened them with legal
action, they still continue to call us – and as late as 9:30 p.m. What can
be done to stop these annoying calls?”
 
And another typical complaint from the other side of the country—this time
from Norm, in Shawnigan Lake, British Columbia writes:
 
“We are on the Do Not Call List and received a phone call at 12:59 a.m.
They wanted me to press 1 to speak to an operator to lower my credit card
interest rate. I pressed 1, and then when a person answered I asked ‘why
are you calling me when I'm on the Do Not Call List?’ He claimed I called
him! Why are they allowed to phone my private residence when I'm
registered to not receive these calls?”
 
As irritated as the person receiving the calls may be, pity the poor
victim whose number is spoofed. There was a recent case in Ottawa where an
innocent person was inundated with harassing calls from hundreds of angry
people who had been contacted by a telemarketer using her number.
 
So what is the CRTC doing to get at these rogue telemarketers?
 
First, we have been in discussions with our law enforcement partners here
in Canada as well as telecommunications companies to evaluate how to
address this growing problem.
 
International cooperation
 
However, there are limits to what we can do domestically, given that these
calls come from all over the world. Telemarketers, like hackers and
spammers, often operate outside our borders.
 
That’s why we collaborate with our international counterparts—the Federal
Trade Commission in the U.S., the Office of Communication (OFCOM) in the
U.K., the Authority for Consumers and Markets in the Netherlands, the
Australian Communications and Media Authority and others. 
 
We’ve led or participated in many international networks. We were one of
the co-founders of the International Do Not Call Network and are an active
member of the London Action Plan. Both these groups were created to foster
greater cooperation on cross-border issues.
 
We are also working with telecommunications service providers and the
Messaging Anti-Abuse Working Group to step up our efforts to find rogue
telemarketers. The CRTC took part in the Group’s first voice and telephony
anti-abuse workshop in February as well as a follow-up meeting held last
week in Montreal. 
 
We focused on a range of possible solutions to stop these types of abuses
and to overcome the hurdles to implementing them. We are exploring
proactive approaches to foresee abuses or attacks, monitor them and take
enforcement actions before they reach consumers.
 
For instance, we are creating voice telephony honeypots to lure rogue
telemarketers so we can catch them in their deceitful webs. These
so-called honeypots involve a series of numbers, along with call routings,
that are being given to regulators in various countries by
telecommunications companies. We would use them to monitor all incoming
calls in our respective jurisdictions and better target our enforcement
efforts. We hope to have more news on this front later this summer.
 
We are also exploring trace-back programs, call-blocking policies and
abuse reporting.
 
Another area of shared concern with our international partners is how
people report calls made using spoofed numbers. 
 
We are working in partnership with the private sector on a system that
would let Canadians press a number on their phones after receiving a
spoofed call to automatically forward the information to the CRTC for
follow-up. Something along the lines of the Star 09 or Star 69 services
you may be familiar with.
 
We are determined to beat the bad guys at their own game by developing a
technology solution to a technology problem. Because we recognize there’s
no putting the genie back in this bottle.
 
This is not something we can do alone. Given that the industry has a
pivotal role to play in maintaining the integrity of the system, I expect
that it will rise to the challenge.
 
It’s in the business community’s best interests to do so. Because the
public interest is, ultimately, a shared responsibility.
 
Voter contact registry
 
The CRTC’s experience with the National Do Not Call List has given the
federal government the confidence to assign new responsibilities to us.
 
Under the Fair Elections Act that Parliament recently adopted, we were
given the authority to establish and maintain registration information for
voter contact services. This is critical to protecting Canadians’
democratic rights.
 
We will be ready to implement the voter contact registry in time for the
2015 federal election. We will be conducting outreach activities to ensure
candidates and voter contact services are aware of their new
responsibilities and to provide information to the public.
 
This new registry reinforces the central role citizens play in the CRTC’s
mandate and just how seriously we take this responsibility.
 
CASL
 
We are also the primary agency responsible for ensuring compliance with
Canada’s anti-spam legislation.
 
Now, I suspect many of you have had a flurry of emails over the past
weeks. Everybody—from your accountant and real estate agent to online
retailers—is asking for your consent to continue receiving messages from
them. I have been receiving an average of five a day. Do not despair. This
is the final unregulated rush as companies prepare for the law to come
into force on July 1st.
 
Once it is in force, this new law will protect Canadians while ensuring
businesses can continue to compete in the global marketplace with the
assurance of a secure online environment.
 
As business people, you know better than anyone the damage that hackers
can do. You recognize just how dangerous spyware, malware and phishing are
to your operations and how seriously they can hurt your brand.
 
Once these programs are installed on a computer, spammers can steal
personal data, defraud individuals and corporations, and disrupt the
legitimate flow of information across electronic media.
 
The new federal strategy, Digital Canada 150, reports that 32% of
computers worldwide were infected with malware in 2012. There was a 600%
increase in the number of websites hosting malware from the year before.
 
Even more alarming, the Washington-based Center for Strategic &
International Studies recently reported that cybercrime costs the global
economy US$400 billion each year. The impact on the Canadian economy is
estimated at US$3.2 billion.
 
All of this chips away at Canadians’ confidence in e-commerce, at great
cost to your companies and the economy at large. That’s a serious problem
given that Canadians are among the lowest users of e-commerce in the G7. 
 
Canada is ranked as 2nd in Internet penetration among its G7 counterparts.
But Canadians spend less online than citizens in other countries. The
value of e-commerce in Canada was $22.3 billion in 2013.
 
That may sound impressive, but a 2012 study shows that e-commerce
accounted for only 3.4% of total spending in this country. Compare that to
7.1% in the U.S and 23% in the United Kingdom that same year.
 
A more secure environment is not only good for citizens. It is equally
good for business.
 
So we will be going after the most egregious violators: the high-volume
spammers, the malicious URLs and the botnets located in Canada.
 
Under Canada’s anti-spam legislation, or CASL for short, the Commission
will investigate individuals and organizations for:
 
 - sending commercial electronic messages without prior consent, that do not
have an unsubscribe mechanism or that do not include identification
information
 
 - altering transmission data without a recipient’s permission – for example,
directing Internet users to a website they did not intend to visit, and
 
 - starting in January 2015, installing a program or application on a
computer system or network without the individual’s express consent.
 
It will be against the law to use false or misleading representations
online to promote products or services, to collect personal information
through accessing a computer system, or to harvest addresses without
permission.
 
These rules not only apply to email but to all electronic messages – text
messages, message on social networks and other forms of electronic
communications.
 
Basically, anyone who sends commercial messages to Canadians will need to
comply with the law.
 
As of next week, Canadians can start reporting spam and other electronic
threats to the Spam Reporting Centre. It will serve as a clearing house
for complaints that will be assigned to the CRTC, the Competition Bureau
or the Office of the Privacy Commissioner for assessment and appropriate
action.
 
The CRTC has a team of highly-qualified people ready to start enforcing
Canada’s anti-spam legislation. We have former RCMP officers, major
criminal investigators and sophisticated computer forensics experts who
will be leading these efforts. Enforcement is now in the CRTC’s DNA.
 
Beyond additional personnel, we have state-of-the-art facilities in our
new cyber-forensics lab—an in-house centre designed and built by the
country’s foremost technology leaders. The lab will enable us to search,
seize and copy digital evidence that proves violations of the new law to
better protect the public. 
 
Our electronic commerce enforcement specialists will be able to search and
index tens of millions of messages and reverse engineer malware to trace
the source of these scams and follow their online links.
 
We have some serious financial clout too. The CRTC will be able to issue
penalties of up to $1 million for an individual and up to $10 million for
a company per violation. As of July 1, 2017, individuals and organizations
affected by a contravention of the law will be able to take court action
to seek actual and statutory damages.
 
Similarly, I am pleased to note that, last December, the Minister of
Industry announced that the government intends to amend the
Telecommunications Act to give us the power to impose monetary penalties
across all our telecommunications activities. I look forward to seeing
that legislation enacted in the coming months.
 
Once in place, it would mean, for example, that we could assign penalties
if a service provider did not follow requirements related to the 9-1-1
system, or if a wireless provider contravened the wireless code.
 
We’ve seen a few over-the-top reactions to these new powers from folks who
are convinced we are out to get them. We have heard concerns that we will
start imposing significant penalties for even the smallest violations. 
 
I want to say a few things about this. First, CASL is the law. It was
passed by our elected representatives in Parliament. The CRTC has a duty
to implement it.
 
Second, as I alluded to earlier, we have more than enough human and
technical resources to do whatever is needed to ensure the law is upheld.
 
Third, and more fundamental, punishment is not our goal. We are not going
to go after every indie rock band that’s trying to sell a new release to
its fans. We have much bigger fish to fry.
 
The CRTC will focus on the most severe types of violations. This means you
may still receive the occasional spam message after July 1st. Our
principal targets are abusive spammers and interlopers involved in botnets
and, come January, malware and malicious URLs.
 
Our responses to complaints will range from written warnings up to
financial penalties or court actions. Our objective is to secure
compliance and prevent recidivism. I believe the best enforcement approach
should be determined by the facts surrounding each particular case.
 
My final point is simply this: if you abide by the law you have nothing to
fear. Good corporate citizens will be in good standing.
 
Now, I realize there’s the potential for the law to become known as the
‘unemployed lawyers relief act’ if companies choose to fight these
changes. But I would strongly urge corporate leaders to get with the
program. 
 
Ultimately, Canada’s anti-spam legislation, like the proposed changes to
the Telecommunications Act, is about creating a better, safer, more
trusted environment to do business.
 
9-1-1
 
I have gone on at length about protecting the public interest and I
haven’t even touched on 9-1-1 services – the very epitome of why Canadians
need a reliable and modern communication system.
 
If I had more time, and you didn’t need to run to the office, I would tell
you about the next generation of 9-1-1 services. 
 
There is no question we need to update the system so Canadians can
communicate with 9-1-1 call centres using different media—things like text
messages, pictures and videos.
 
We have just released our action plan to enhance existing 9-1-1 services
and ensure that telecommunications networks are ready to support
next-generation 9-1-1 services. You can find a fact sheet on this topic on
our website.
 
This is a complex issue involving many players. This includes multiple
departments in multiple levels of government—federal, provincial,
territorial and municipal—as well as call centres and emergency
responders.
 
Some have suggested that greater coordination between the different
partners could be achieved through a national forum. We would be prepared
to participate in such a forum and share our expertise in the areas under
our jurisdiction.
 
I can attest to real-life examples I come across in my work which
underscore why having a secure and reliable communications system is
vitally important. It is, quite literally, sometimes a matter of life and
death.
 
One of the most difficult parts of my job is receiving copies of coroner’s
reports that describe someone losing their life because emergency
responders were unable to locate the person quickly enough. These cases
illustrate how Canada’s communication system—our communication system—can
—and must—do better.
 
Conclusion
 
Situations like these also underline the difficult balance that CRTC
Commissioners must work to achieve as we juggle the interests of
consumers, creators and citizens.
 
We prefer to be unobtrusive in the marketplace whenever possible. Yet we
have new legal obligations to put an end to harmful activities that
threaten the lives and livelihoods of Canadians.
 
No matter what, we must look out for the public interest, which overrides
all other considerations. While the market will generally address the
needs of most consumers, it will not always address those of citizens.
 
And, as Thomas Murphy said, if we fail in this, we fail in everything.
 
We are seeing a new CRTC emerge as we take on a greater enforcement role.
In future, we will play a more active part in meeting head-on the
challenges that come with fast-changing communications technologies.
 
But this isn’t just the Commission’s domain. Protecting the public
interest is something we all need to take seriously, given the high stakes
in today’s highly connected world. We have a collective interest in, and
responsibility to, make sure new technologies do good, not harm—for the
good of us all.
 
The public sector, the private sector and non-governmental organizations
all have a contribution to make in ensuring Canadians’ communication
system upholds their rights and interests, and protects their health and
safety.
 
I look forward to working with corporate leaders like you as we do just
that.
 
Thank you.

 

CRTC to ensure telecommunications networks can support next-generation 9-1-1 services‏

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CRTC to ensure telecommunications networks can support 
next-generation 9-1-1 services
 
June 25, 2014 – Ottawa–Gatineau
 
The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)
today announced the steps it will take to enhance Canadians’ access to
existing 9-1-1 services and facilitate the transition to next-generation
9-1-1 services.
 
The action plan published today was established further to a consultation
in which Canadians were asked to identify and prioritize the matters
within the CRTC’s jurisdiction that should be addressed regarding 9-1-1
services. The CRTC regulates the telecommunications service providers that
carry calls to 9-1-1 call centres, while emergency responders and call
centres are under the jurisdiction of municipalities, provinces and
territories.
 
During the recent consultation, some participants suggested that a
national forum could be established to promote better coordination between
the different partners in the provision of 9-1-1 services. As the 9-1-1
system is a shared responsibility, collaboration between all parties
involved would be very helpful to not only improve the current system, but
prepare it for next-generation 9-1-1 and new technologies.
 
The CRTC would be prepared to participate in such a forum and share its
expertise in the areas under its jurisdiction.
 
In the meantime, the CRTC will review the regulatory framework for
next-generation 9-1-1 and will launch a proceeding in early 2016 to ensure
telecommunications service providers’ networks can support new
technologies when 9-1-1 call centres have the capabilities to use them.
 
The CRTC will also address certain priorities related to the existing
9-1-1 system. These include improving caller location information,
reviewing the reliability and resiliency of 9-1-1 networks and supporting
efforts to prevent accidental 9-1-1 calls.
 
Finally, in order to assist the CRTC in making decisions on various 9-1-1
matters, telecommunications service providers will be required to provide
relevant data whenever necessary.
 
Through this action plan, the CRTC is ensuring that Canadian
telecommunications networks are evolving at an appropriate pace to support
Canadians’ needs for effective access to 9-1-1 emergency services as part
of a world-class communications system.
 
Quick Facts
 
- The CRTC is creating a safer environment for Canadians by ensuring they
have access to 9-1-1 services through a reliable and modern communication
system.
- The CRTC has issued an action plan to improve Canadians’ access to
current 9-1-1 services and prepare for a review of next-generation 9-1-1
services.
- The CRTC’s action plan is based on the comments received following the
publication of a report on 9-1-1 services by a CRTC-appointed Inquiry
Officer.
- In recent years, the CRTC has taken steps to improve the 9-1-1 system in
Canada.  Examples include enhancements to telecommunications networks in
order to permit the introduction of Text with 9-1-1 for hearing- and
speech-impaired Canadians and the transmission of wireless location
information.
- Next-generation technologies are expected to improve how Canadians
communicate with 9-1-1 call centres by enabling them to send text
messages, pictures and videos, as well as interact with emergency
operators through other means. The adoption of these technologies will
occurgradually over the next few years.
 
Quote
 
“The health and safety of Canadians is improved through their
communication system, in particular by ensuring they have effective access
to 9-1-1 services. The action plan we have announced today will not only
enhance access to existing services, but also ensure telecommunications
networks are ready to support next-generation 9-1-1 services. This
illustrates how we will continue to fulfill our mandate to ensure the
communication system protects Canadians. As the governance for the 9-1-1
system is shared, we would also welcome greater coordination on 9-1-1
matters.”
- Jean-Pierre Blais, Chairman of CRTC
 
Associated Links
 
CRTC to examine future of 9-1-1 services in Canada
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/com100/2012/r121217.htm
 
A Report on Matters Related to Emergency 9-1-1
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/publications/reports/rp130705.htm
 
CRTC marks the start of Text with 9-1-1 services for 
hearing or speech impaired persons
http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do?nid=835029
 
9-1-1 Services for Traditional Wireline, VoIP and Wireless Phone Services
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/info_sht/t1035.htm
 
Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2014-342
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2014/2014-342.htm
 
- 30 -
 
Contacts
 
Follow us on Twitter: @CRTCeng
Media relations:
Media Relations – Tel.: 819-997-9403; Fax: 819-997-4245
General inquiries:
Tel.: 819-997-0313, TDD: 819-994-0423; Fax: 819-994-0218
Toll-free No.: 1-877-249-CRTC (2782)
TDD – Toll-free No.: 1-877-909-CRTC (2782)
Ask a question or make a complaint
 
These documents are available in alternative format upon request.

 

The CRTC enhances the protection of Canadian’s privacy by rendering the National Do Not Call List (DNCL) permanent‏

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The CRTC enhances the protection of Canadian's privacy by 
rendering the National Do Not Call List (DNCL) permanent
 
June 25, 2014 – Ottawa-Gatineau
 
The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)
today announced that the registration of telecommunications numbers on the
National Do Not Call List (DNCL) will now be permanent.
 
Initially, number registrations with the National DNCL were for a set
amount of time, after which Canadians would have had to re-register their
numbers. This change enhances the CRTC’s ability to protect the privacy of
Canadians from unwanted telemarketing calls. Canadians can, at any time,
check the National DNCL to find out if their number is on the List and, if
they wish, have it removed.
 
The CRTC would like to remind telecommunications companies of the
importance of their role in maintaining the integrity of the National DNCL
and encourages the industry to keep working with the CRTC Interconnection
Steering Committee (CISC) to find an economic and viable mechanism to
remove from the List disconnected and reassigned numbers.
 
Over 12 million numbers are currently registered and, on average, 1,200
new numbers are still being added every day. The CRTC is continuing to
enhance its monitoring in order to ensure that all telemarketers follow
the rules. Since the creation of the National DNCL in 2008, the CRTC has
conducted 1,200 investigations and has imposed almost $4 million in
administrative monetary penalties, which are paid to the Receiver General
for Canada.
 
Quick facts
 
- The CRTC is improving the National DNCL by making registration
permanent.
- Canadians can remove their number from the National DNCL at any time.
- The CRTC reminds telecommunications companies of the importance of their
role in maintaining the integrity of the National DNCL.
- The CRTC is continuing to enhance its monitoring in order to ensure that
all telemarketers follow the rules.
 
Quote
"The National DNCL was created to respect the wishes of Canadians who do
not want to receive any more telemarketing calls. It therefore makes sense
that registration be made permanent in order to spare Canadians the
inconvenience of having to re-register their number on the List. We are
pursuing our efforts to ensure that telemarketers respect the wishes of
Canadians.”
- Jean-Pierre Blais, CRTC Chairman
 
Related product
 
Compliance and Enforcement Regulatory Policy CRTC 2014-341
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2014/2014-341.htm
 
Related link
 
Compliance and Enforcement Notice of Consultation CRTC 2013-527
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2013/2013-527.htm
 
- 30 -
 
Contacts
 
Follow us on Twitter: @CRTCeng
Media relations:
Media Relations – Tel.: 819-997-9403; Fax: 819-997-4245
General inquiries:
Tel.: 819-997-0313, TDD: 819-994-0423; Fax: 819-994-0218
Toll-free No.: 1-877-249-CRTC (2782)
TDD – Toll-free No.: 1-877-909-CRTC (2782)
Ask a question or make a complaint
 
These documents are available in alternative format upon request.

 

CRTC releases 2013 financial results for Canadian commercial radio‏

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NEW AVG PC Tuneup 2014!

June 3, 2014 – Ottawa-Gatineau – Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)
today released statistical and financial information on the 685 commercial
radio stations operating in Canada for the broadcast year that ended on
August 31, 2013.

Revenues remained relatively stable from the previous year despite
competition from satellite, online and mobile services. Total revenues for
AM and FM stations increased by 0.26%, from $1.618 billion in 2012 to
$1.623 billion in 2013. These revenues enable commercial radio stations to
provide a variety of programming to Canadians, support established and
emerging Canadian talent, and offer employment opportunities to over
10,200 people. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC recognized for its creative and innovative work on behalf of Canadians‏

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CRTC recognized for its creative and innovative work 
on behalf of Canadians

June 19, 2014 – Ottawa-Gatineau – Canadian Radio-television 
and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is
proud that its work is being recognized through the Public Service Awards
of Excellence. CRTC employees will be honoured at a ceremony this fall for
their creative and innovative work in the areas of Official Languages,
Employment Equity and Diversity, and Policy. 

CRTC employees will receive an award in the Official Languages category
for the high degree to which the use of English and French was promoted in
all aspects of the CBC/Radio-Canada licence renewal proceeding. Throughout
the proceeding, the CRTC instituted measures to ensure that all Canadians
could be heard in the language of their choice and to foster the full
participation of official language minority communities. These measures
set a new standard, which have been emulated in subsequent CRTC
proceedings.

The CRTC’s long-standing commitment to support the integration of
developmentally-challenged employees in the workplace will also be
recognized. Since 1991, the CRTC has welcomed individuals who live with
Down syndrome or other developmental disabilities and has fostered a
stable, fulfilling and accepting workplace in which their unique needs are
addressed and respected. The CRTC’s Developmentally-Challenged Employees
Steering Committee will receive the Employment Equity and Diversity award
for its management of this initiative. 

Finally, CRTC employees will receive an award in the Policy category in
recognition of how it engaged Canadians in new and innovative ways to
develop a code of conduct for wireless service providers. The CRTC made
extensive use of social media and other technologies to engage Canadians
and ensure the public’s views were included in the discussion at a public
hearing. The result was a code of conduct that addresses many of the
frustrations that Canadians shared with the CRTC and that contributes to a
dynamic marketplace.

The CRTC is proud of the work it is carrying out to ensure Canadian
citizens, creators and consumers are at the centre of a world-class
communication system.

The CRTC congratulates all of this year’s award nominees and recipients
for their outstanding contributions to improving the lives of Canadians.

Quick Facts
• CRTC employees will be honoured at a ceremony this fall for their
creative and innovative work in the areas of Official Languages,
Employment Equity and Diversity, and Policy. 
• The CRTC is proud of the work it is carrying out to ensure Canadian
citizens, creators and consumers are at the centre of a world-class
communication system.

Related links
Public Service Award of Excellence 2014 recipients
(http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/arp/aepe14-eng.asp)

- 30 -

Contacts

Follow us on Twitter: @CRTCeng

Media Relations:
Media Relations
http://support.crtc.gc.ca/crtcsubmissionmu/forms/mediarelations.aspx?lang=e
Tel: 819-997-9403, Fax: 819-997-4245

General Inquiries:
Tel: 819-997-0313, TDD: 819-994-0423, Fax: 819-994-0218
Toll-free # 1-877-249-CRTC (2782)
TDD - Toll-free # 1-877-909-CRTC (2782)
Ask a question or make a complaint
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/rapidsccm/register.asp?lang=e

This document is available in alternative format upon request.

 

CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 2 to 6 June 2014‏

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The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory
policies in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to
change without notice.

Broadcasting Decisions: 

Application by United Christian Broadcasters Canada 
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2013/2013-568.htm#d17
for authority to acquire from Thunder Bay Christian Radio the assets of the
English-language specialty (Christian music) radio station CJOA-FM Thunder
Bay

Decisions related to the following radio licence renewal applications:

- Native Evangelical Fellowship of Canada, Inc. http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2014/2014-47.htm
Application 2013-1682-8

- Fairchild Radio Group Ltd. http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2014/2014-47.htm
Application 2013-1537-5

- Radio communautaire MF Lac Simon inc. http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2014/2014-58.htm
Application 2013-1505-2

- 176100 Canada Inc. http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2014/2014-59.htm
Application 2013-1547-4 

- Hay River Broadcasting Society http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2014/2014-128.htm
Application 2013-1408-8

- CHSR Broadcasting, Inc. http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2014/2014-128.htm
Application 2013-1644-8

Decisions related to the following television licence renewal
applications:

- Zeste Diffusion inc. http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2014/2014-151.htm#bm15
Application 2014-0043-1

- Telelatino Network Inc. http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2014/2014-151.htm#bm17
Application 2014-0045-7

- Sex-Shop Television Inc. http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2014/2014-151.htm#bm16
Application 2013-1749-6

 

 

 

CRTC wireless code comes into force: Canadians can cancel their contracts without penalty after two years

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OTTAWA-GATINEAU, December 2, 2013 — The Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) today marked the coming into force of
its wireless code, which enables Canadians to cancel their contracts at no
cost after a maximum of two years. The code also makes it easier for
Canadians to understand their contracts for cellphones and other mobile
devices and sets out their basic rights. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC to introduce a new area code in southwestern Ontario in 2015

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OTTAWA-GATINEAU, October 30, 2013 — The Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) announced that it will introduce a
new area code in southwestern Ontario. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC to introduce a new area code in Alberta in 2016

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OTTAWA-GATINEAU, October 30, 2013 — Today, the Canadian Radio-television
and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) announced that it will introduce
a new province-wide area code in Alberta, which is presently served by
area codes 403, 587 and 780. Read the rest of this entry »

Speech

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Opening remarks

by Peter Menzies

Vice-Chairman
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

at the public hearing

Gatineau, Quebec

October 21, 2013

(Check against delivery)

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen, and welcome to this public hearing. Read the rest of this entry »

Statement

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International enforcement agencies join forces to thwart caller
identification spoofing

OTTAWA-GATINEAU, October 21, 2013 — Today, agencies from Canada, the
United States, and the United Kingdom issued the following statement: Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC Newsrelease‏

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Canadian Union of Postal Workers and Union Calling Inc. pay a total of
$115,000 in penalties for violating Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules

OTTAWA-GATINEAU, October 15, 2013 — Today, the Canadian Radio-television
and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) announced that the Canadian Union
of Postal Workers has paid a penalty of $50,000 and Union Calling Inc. has
paid a penalty of $65,000 as part of settlements over violations to the
Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC decisions and regulatory policies for the week of 23 to 27 September 2013

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The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory
policies in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to
change without notice. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC decisions and regulatory policies for the week of 12 to 16 August 2013

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The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory policies
in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to change
without notice. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC approves BCE’s bid to acquire Astral’s television and radio services Conditions imposed will ensure the transaction benefits Canadians and the Canadian broadcasting system

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OTTAWA-GATINEAU, June 27, 2013 — Today, the Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved an application by Astral
Media Inc. to sell its pay and specialty television channels, conventional
television stations and radio stations to BCE Inc. The CRTC’s approval
comes with a number of conditions that are necessary to uphold the public
interest.
 Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 17 to 21 2013‏

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CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 17 to 21 2013

The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory policies
in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to change
without notice. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC releases 2012 financial results for Canadian conventional television stations

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OTTAWA-GATINEAU, June 13, 2013 —Today, the Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) released statistical and financial
information on Canadian conventional television stations for the broadcast
year ended August 31, 2012. These annual reports allow interested parties,
including Canadians, to stay informed about the state of the Canadian
communications industry. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC decisions and regulatory policies for the week of 10 to 14 June 2013

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CRTC decisions and regulatory policies for the week of 10 to 14 June 2013

The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory policies
in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to change
without notice.

Broadcasting Decisions:

Application by Shaw Television Limited Partnership
https://services.crtc.gc.ca/pub/instances-proceedings/Default-Defaut.aspx?S=C&PA=B&PT=PT1&PST=A&Lang=eng
to amend the broadcasting licence for the English-language television
service CKND-DT Winnipeg in order to add a digital transmitter to replace
its existing analog transmitter CKND-TV-2 Minnedosa

Application by TVtropolis General Partnership
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2013/2013-106.htm#bm4 for authority to
acquire the assets of the national, English-language specialty Category A
service TVtropolis

CRTC decisions and regulatory policies for the week of 3 to 7 June 2013

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CRTC decisions and regulatory policies for the week of 3 to 7 June 2013

The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory policies
in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to change
without notice.

Broadcasting Decision:

None

Telecom Decision:

Forbearance from the regulation of high capacity / digital data services
interexchange private line services on certain additional routes
File number: 8638-S1-01/98
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/partvii/eng/1998/8638-98.htm

Telecom Regulatory Policy:

The Wireless Code
File number: 8665-C12-201212448
https://services.crtc.gc.ca/pub/instances-proceedings/Default-Defaut.aspx?S=C&PA=T&PT=NC&PST=A&Lang=eng

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In settlement with CRTC, Comwave Telenetworks Inc. agrees to pay $100,000

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on May 23, 2013 at 3:00 AM
OTTAWA-GATINEAU, April 3, 2013 — Today, the Canadian Radio-television 
and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) announced that Comwave Telenetworks Inc. has paid a penalty of $100,000 to the Receiver General for 
Canada as part of a settlement over its telemarketing practices. 
Comwave provides telecommunications services, such as home telephone, Voice over Internet Protocol telephone and long-distance services. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 2 to 5 April 2013‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on May 18, 2013 at 3:00 AM
CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 2 to 5 April 2013

The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory policies
in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to change
without notice. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC decisions and regulatory policies for the week of 25 to 28 March 2013‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on April 30, 2013 at 3:00 AM
CRTC decisions and regulatory policies for the 
week of 25 to 28 March 2013

The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and regulatory policies in
the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to change
without notice. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC Additional Information

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on February 27, 2013 at 3:00 AM

Additional information on wholesale high-speed access services

In the late 1990s, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications
Commission (CRTC) decided that it would not intervene in Internet
services. There was enough competition to give Canadians choice. Internet
service providers set the rates paid by consumers, as well as other terms
and conditions, without having to obtain the CRTC’s approval. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC finalizes wholesale rates for independent service providers‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on February 26, 2013 at 3:00 AM
CRTC finalizes wholesale rates for independent service providers

 Today, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

(CRTC) established final rates for the wholesale high-speed access

services used by independent service providers to offer competitively

priced Internet and other services. As a result of certain adjustments,
some independent service providers will see significant reductions in the

wholesale rates they pay.  Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 18 to 22 February 2013

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on February 25, 2013 at 3:00 AM
The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory policies
in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to change
without notice.
 
Broadcasting decisions: Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 11 to 15 February 2013‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on February 23, 2013 at 3:00 AM
CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 11 to 15 
February 2013
 
The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory policies
in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to change
without notice.
 
Broadcasting decisions:
 
Application by 9262-8148 Québec inc.
(http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2012/2012-475.htm#bm14) for a
broadcasting licence to operate Télé Santé +, a national French-language
specialty Category B service 
 
Application by Canadian Hellenic Cable Radio Ltd.
(https://services.crtc.gc.ca/pub/instances-proceedings/Default-Defaut.aspx?S=C&PA=B&PT=PT1&PST=A&Lang=eng)
to change the authorized contours of the ethnic specialty commercial radio
station CKIN-FM Montréal
 
----
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CRTC decisions and regulatory policies for the week of 7 to 11 January 2013‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on February 1, 2013 at 3:00 AM
CRTC decisions and regulatory policies for the week of 7 to 11 January
2013
 
The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory
policies in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject
to change without notice. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC increases the diversity of voices in the Montreal market

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on December 23, 2012 at 3:00 AM
OTTAWA-GATINEAU — Today, the Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved a new multilingual
television station to be called International Channel/Canal International
(ICI). The CRTC also approved an application by Rogers to acquire CJNT, an
ethnic television station, and authorized it to convert the station to an
English-language station.  Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC to examine future of 911 services in Canada

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, cars, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Pets, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on December 20, 2012 at 3:00 AM
OTTAWA-GATINEAU, December 17, 2012 — Today, the Canadian Radio-television
and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) announced that it will examine
the future of 911 services in Canada. To prepare for the formal review in
2014-2015, the CRTC has appointed National Commissioner Tim Denton as an
Inquiry Officer and invites Canadians to share their views on how 911
services could be improved. Mr. Denton will report his findings to the
CRTC by the end of May 2013. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies‏

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on December 19, 2012 at 3:00 AM
CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 17 to 21 December
2012
 
The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory policies
in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to change
without notice.
 
Broadcasting Decision: Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 10 to 14 December 2012

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Home Decor, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Uncategorized, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on December 12, 2012 at 3:00 AM
The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory policies
in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to change
without notice.
 
Broadcasting Decision:
 
Application by OUTtv Network Inc.
https://services.crtc.gc.ca/pub/instances-proceedings/Default-Defaut.aspx?S=C&PA=B&PT=PT1&PST=A&Lang=eng
alleging that TELUS Communications Company has subjected it to an undue
disadvantage or has given other programming services an undue preference 
 
Telecom Decision:
 
Revocation of basic international telecommunications services licences

CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 3 to 7 December 2012

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on December 5, 2012 at 3:00 AM
The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory policies
in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to change
without notice. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC addresses telephone number shortage in Ontario and Alberta

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Sports, Technology, travel, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on December 3, 2012 at 3:00 AM
OTTAWA-GATINEAU, November 29, 2012 — Today, the Canadian Radio-television
and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) began a process to address a
predicted telephone number shortage in southern Ontario and all regions of
Alberta.  Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 26 to 30 November 2012

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on December 1, 2012 at 3:00 AM
The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory policies
in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to change
without notice. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 19 to 23 November 2012

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on November 29, 2012 at 3:00 AM
The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory policies
in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to change
without notice. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC invites Canadians to join online discussion on the wireless code

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on November 18, 2012 at 3:00 AM


OTTAWA-GATINEAU, November 13, 2012 — Today, the Canadian Radio-television
and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) launched an online discussion to
facilitate broader discussion among Canadians on a new code for wireless
services, such as cellphones and other personal mobile devices. This
discussion is part of a proceeding that will include a public hearing
beginning on February 11, 2013, in Gatineau, Que. Read the rest of this entry »

CRTC Decisions and Regulatory Policies for the week of 12 to 16 November 2012

In Beauty, book reviews, Business, Contact Information, Creative Writing, Culture, Disability, Education, Entertainment, Environment, Events, Health, Living, Media Writing, Movie Reviews, Music, Opinion, Radio Podcasts, Religion, Restaurant Reviews, Sports, Technology, travel, Video Work, Writing (all kinds) on November 17, 2012 at 3:00 AM
The CRTC plans to issue the following decisions and/or regulatory policies
in the coming week. This list may not be complete and is subject to change
without notice.
 
Broadcasting decisions: Read the rest of this entry »
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